FRACTURED AIR

The universe is making music all the time

Posts Tagged ‘Triskel Arts Centre

Julia Kent plus Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh

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We are delighted to present (alongside Plugd Records):
Julia Kent plus very special guest Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh, who will perform at the T.D.C. Triskel Arts Centre, Cork, on Saturday 1st March 2014.

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Julia Kent

“For me, music is really about communicating, and the kind of instrumental music I make is a way of expressing emotion without words. I feel really fortunate to be able to travel and play, as I do; I’ve had some wonderful encounters all over the world. Of course it’s a bit of a cliché to say that music is a universal language, but it truly is. Through music you can communicate with anyone.”

—Julia Kent

After years spent performing and recording with other artists and groups (including Antony & The Johnsons), Canadian-born, New York City-based Julia Kent found her own voice with her solo debut, ‘Delay’, an exploration of the private emotional worlds that exist within the disjunctions and disorientations of travel, hailed for its “lovely, melancholy” compositions, full of “aching romanticism…rich melodicism, and detailed arrangements.” She toured to support it throughout Europe and North America, and subsequently released an EP, ‘Last Day in July’.
In ‘Green and Grey’, her following solo record, she continued to use looped and layered cello, electronics, and field recordings to explore the intersections between the human world and the natural world, the melding of the technological and the organic, the patterns and repetitions that exist in nature and are mirrored in human creations, and the complexity and fragility of our relationships with one another and with the world that surrounds us.
‘Character’, released by The Leaf Label in March 2013, confirms Julia Kent as one of the most intriguing solo composers making music today. Reflecting on ‘Character’, Kent has said:

“I was inspired by the idea that we are all, in a way, characters in the narrative that is our life, but that we aren’t able to control that narrative as an author might. So the record is meant to reflect the paths we take through life, and how that journey can end up.”

Julia Kent has composed a number of original film scores, and her music has been used as accompaniment to theatre and dance performances. She has toured throughout Europe and North America, including appearances at Primavera Sound in Barcelona, the Donau festival in Austria, Meltdown in London, and the Unsound festival in New York City. Julia Kent’s spellbinding third album ‘Character’ is available now on the Leaf label.

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Press:

“It is here that she speaks most poignantly of loneliness, fear, desire, life’s richness, and more – by creating a listening experience of nearly cavernous depth and poetic beauty.” AllMusic

“By the end, listeners have gained a sense of Kent’s character: ambitious, resolute, not content to rest on laurels. These traits serve her well, inspiring the possibility that every subsequent album will be her greatest.” A Closer Listen

“this is a gorgeous, gloomy half-portrait of enjoyable, gritty complexity.” BBC Music

“intriguingly intimate exploration of inner space” Dummy Magazine

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Links:

http://www.juliakent.com
http://www.theleaflabel.com

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Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh

Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh plays traditional and contemporary folk music on Hardanger d’Amore and other fiddles. In addition to being an established solo artist, Ó Raghallaigh is a member of two groups: The Gloaming (Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh, Iarla Ó Lionaird, Thomas Bartlett, Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill) and This Is How We Fly (Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh, Petter Berndalen, Seán MacErlaine, Nic Gareiss); he performs duos with dynamic Kerry accordion player Brendan Begley and Dublin uilleann piper Mick O’Brien and plays in a trio with Martin Hayes and Peadar Ó Riada.

This will be Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh’s first return to the Triskel since last year’s special live performance with The Gloaming and will provide audiences with the chance to witness the immaculate musicianship and immense talents of Ó Raghallaigh in a special solo performance.

Ó Raghallaigh has released eight albums to date: Kitty Lie Over and Deadly Buzz with Mick O’Brien; A Moment of Madness with Brendan Begley; Triúr Arís and Triúr sa Draighean with Martin Hayes and Peadar Ó Riada; Comb Your Hair and Curl It with Mícheál Ó Raghallaigh and Catherine McEvoy; the eponymous debut from the band This is How We Fly; and his solo Where the One-Eyed Man is King.

As well his work in traditional Irish music, Caoimhín writes new contemporary material that explores the region where traditional music begins to disintegrate. Last December, RTE premiered The Gloaming, a documentary featuring the 5-piece as they “perform creative and innovative interpretations of traditional music.” 2013 also saw the release of This Is How We Fly’s stunning eponymous debut album, available now on Playing With Music.

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Press:

“the most imaginative and fascinating musician in all of trad” —Earle Hitchner, Irish Echo, USA

“the most singular traditional Irish musician of [his] generation.”  —State Magazine, Ireland

“the missing link between Martin Hayes and Purple Haze”  —Nick Kelly, Irish Independent

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Links:

http://www.caoimhinoraghallaigh.com
http://www.thisishowwefly.net
http://thegloaming.net

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Fractured Air & Plugd Records present:
Julia Kent (plus very special guest Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh) at the T.D.C. Triskel Arts Centre, Cork, on Saturday 1st March 2014. Tickets are €12/€10 and are available at Plugd Records and Triskel Box Office, Triskel Arts Centre, Tobin Street, Cork (Telephone: 021 427 2022).

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Facebook Event Page:

https://www.facebook.com/events/578256128917667/

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Colleen with Seti The First & Áine O’Dwyer

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The following is our account of Colleen’s first visit to Cork, Ireland, for her performance at Triskel Christchurch, on Saturday 2nd November 2013. Colleen was supported by the immense talents of Seti The First and Áine O’Dwyer.

Words: Mark & Craig Carry, Photographs: Izabela Szczutkowska

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“Raven, why stare at me with those eyes?
Don’t you know I love you
Just as you are?”

(“Raven”, taken from Colleen’s “The Weighing Of The Heart”)

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Saturday 2nd November 2013. Today is the day we have the joy and pleasure of bringing Colleen (aka French musician Cécile Schott) over to County Cork, Ireland, for her first performance here. The concert is to be held at Triskel Christchurch, Tobin Street, Cork. It’s been ten years since we both first picked up Colleen’s debut album “Everyone Alive Wants Answers”, a record which seemed to open up a whole new world of sound when we first heard it (we would have been eighteen years old, anxious to discover what music beyond the “norm” sounded like). We purchased the CD from our beloved local record store, Plugd Records, at its then location on Washington Street in Cork City. A decade later – and a string of much cherished Colleen albums later – the special soul of Cécile Schott would conclude her “The Weighing Of The Heart” tour (comprising her first live shows in almost five years) in the environs of our own hometown.

A new departure in Colleen’s ever-expanding sound could be witnessed by Schott’s new material on the night (“Lighthouse”, “Captain Of None” and “I’m Kin”) where the influence from the rich musical landscape of Jamaica (through a new dub-like treatment to her compositions) can be heard. “Lighthouse”, already premiered earlier in the year on Colleen’s European tour, contains a repeated mantra-like vocal, where Schott’s voice is at it’s most sumptuous and enchanting to date. Both the lullaby-like vocal delivery of the central lyric “Lights on the ocean” and a short passage on the viola da gamba are looped repeatedly while Schott layers the tapestry-like composition to it’s richly nuanced and beautifully intricate climax. Elsewhere, the new focus on rhythm and percussion are richly evident – augmented by the use of a floor tom drum and an octabass octaver pedal – the latter adding a dynamic, bass-heavy sound to the rhythm – revealing both the boundless possibilities and the forever-expanding inventiveness of Colleen’s most sacred and precious sounds.

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“Be still, don’t do that
I wanted to be here alone
Who are you, I only know
You’re not the person I wanted to
look like What’s up with you
look like you’ve seen a ghost”

(“Hyperbolia”, taken from Áine O’Dwyer’s “Anything bright or startling?”)

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“I’ve always experimented with and enjoyed using extended techniques more so than using additional technology. It’s really lovely to bow the lower base steel strings of a harp. A lengthy piece of rubber cable also creates a nice drone. Playing on dampened strings comes in handy. (excuse the pun) Drum brushes work beautifully. I like to lay the harp down flat and play it as a hammer dulcimer too, given the chance. Metal or glass slides work very well along the strings. If I want a guitar or lute sound, I pluck the string closer to the sound board rather than in the center. Playing it backwards is fun! After that, there’s plectrums, harmonics, tremors, string bending……So, plenty of possibilities there before I ever think of plugging it in.”

(Áine O’Dwyer, on discussing the harp’s possibilities)

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“Musically, it represents a bit of a departure from our first record Melting Cavalry so we are both nervous and excited at the same time. It will be still cello driven but Thomas’s Marxophone is set to take a very prominent position also.”

(Kevin Murphy, Seti The First, on the forthcoming second album by Seti The First)

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“O you my heart be feather-light!”

(Taken from Colleen’s “The Weighing Of The Heart”)

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“Once Upon a Time There Was a Pretty Fly (Lullaby)”

Once upon a time
There was a pretty fly
He had a pretty wife
This pretty fly
But one day
She flew away
Flew away

She had two pretty children
But one night these two pretty children
Flew away
Flew away
Into the sky
Into the moon

(Taken from the 1955 film “The Night Of The Hunter”)

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“At the time of making the album, I just wanted my music to reflect a sense of joy and movement in a way. So I think getting into percussion and into rhythm, it really helped me approach my instruments differently and to step out of my usual patterns.

So, definitely when I started to learn percussion, it mostly started with learning the frame drum. Then all of a sudden, I finally understood how the basic rhythms are put together, and then when I took my other instruments, it just felt immediately natural to play in a more accented rhythmic way.

So I think it’s definitely a big step forward and I’m really looking forward to keeping on working in that direction. It’s what I really want to explore further is the rhythm and the use of the voice, that’s definitely the step forward for me I think.”

(Cécile Schott, in conversation about adding percussion to her music, May 2013)

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“Actually, it’s the most common combination, you know, in popular music in the wide sense: It’s someone singing and they’re playing some kind of instrument at the same time. And obviously that’s been going on for the longest time in history and I thought, well, if I am going to use my voice now, I have to make sure it’s really, really special and I have to keep the thing I did have which was special in my instrumental music. So I did work very hard in trying to achieve that.”

(Cécile Schott, in conversation about adding vocals to her music, May 2013)

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“I rise like the sun above olive trees, like the moon above date palms. Where there is light, I shall be. Where there is darkness, there is none of me. I rise like the moon above date palms. I am counted as one among stars.”

(Excerpt taken from The Egyptian Book of the Dead)

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“Every one of us is, in the cosmic perspective, precious. If a human disagrees with you, let him live. In a hundred billion galaxies, you will not find another.”

―Carl Sagan, “Cosmos”

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“Moon be bright and shine”

(Taken from Colleen’s “The Moon Like A Bell”)

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All photographs by Izabela Szczutkowska (http://www.izyandthesunshines.blogspot.ie).

(The complete series of photographs can be see HERE.)

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Very special thanks to: Cécile, Áine, Seti The First, Lawrence, Triskel Arts Centre, Izabela and everybody in the audience. 

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Written by admin

November 25, 2013 at 10:03 am

Something’s Going On: Andy Stott

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Legendary Manchester-based producer Andy Stott (Modern Love) comes to the Triskel, Cork this December. Stott’s current lp ‘Luxury Problems’ is not only one of the best electronic albums of the year but one of the best albums of the year outright. ‘Luxury Problems’ is the highlight of Stott’s career to date. The album has everything to please every music-loving listener – from the techno kids to the indie kids – and all points in between. Andy Stott performs at the Triskel, Cork on December 29th. Doors 9pm. 

Words, Illustration: Craig Carry

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Last year saw Andy Stott release a pair of Eps, ‘Passed Me By’ and ‘We Stay Together’ (both issued on the wonderful Modern Love label). Both Eps caused quite a stir on release and the wonders of word-of-mouth amongst the independent music community meant Stott’s ‘Luxury Problems’ full length album follow-up was much-anticipated. The album has been hailed as one of the albums of the year by many and has rightly seen Stott’s stock rise considerably this year.

‘Luxury Problems’ is a wonderful example of an album which crosses over multiple music genres (and thus finds a place amongst many music fans’ collections): techno, club, dance, electronic, indie…everyone’s raving about it. Growing up in Manchester, Stott worked as a car repainter while honing his craft as a musician and producer in his own time. This patience can be discerned immediately on listening to ‘Luxury Problems’. Every texture, detail and nuance has its place. Nothing extraneous is left in the final cut. The meticulous production and multiple layering of sounds creates a stunningly evocative atmosphere. It’s the kind of music David Lynch would pick for ‘Twin Peaks’ in the 21st century. Stott’s music commands repeat listening. Not simply due to the beauty and mystery of his musical palette, but due to the many intricate sounds and textures present in his recordings. What’s immediately apparent on first listen is the presence of vocals (a first for Stott) on the album. The vocals in question are supplied by Stott’s former piano teacher, Alison Skidmore. The merging of Skidmore’s ethereal vocals with Stott’s mesmeric sonic textures is truly breath-taking. On tracks such as ‘Numb’ and album-closer (and personal highlight) ‘Leaving’ Skidmore’s vocals are layered over Stott’s textures to stunning effect.

The album cover (as always for Stott) is stunning. This time around the artwork that graces the sleeve is in the form of a black-and-white photograph (courtesy the Dr. Otto Bettmann archive from Corbis Images). It’s subject is a female diver. The grainy black-and-white print encompasses the entire tonal range beautifully made possible with black-and-white photography. The lighting renders every detail and texture (the figure’s hair, skin and bathing suit). She is frozen in time at just the right moment: an image of intense focus, scrutiny and determination as she plunges into the depths below.

The image suits Stott and ‘Luxury Problems’ perfectly. Dive into Stott’s ‘Luxury Problems’ and you will soon discover one of the truly outstanding albums of 2012.

‘Luxury Problems’ is available now on Modern Love. 

Andy Stott performs at the Triskel Arts Centre (TDC space, downstairs) on December 29th, doors 9pm. Tickets available from the Triskel and Plugd Records.

Written by admin

December 19, 2012 at 3:35 pm