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Posts Tagged ‘Set Fire To Flames

Mixtape: A 130701 Mix by Olivier Alary

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This mix was created for the 15th anniversary of 130701, and is formed entirely from material in the 130701 catalogue. I decided to use the entire roster of the label, so that everyone would be represented but I’ve selected the tracks that resonated the most with me. I also focused on the similarities between each artist in order to fuse their music and different approaches together as a whole.”

 Olivier Alary

Words: Mark Carry

Olivier

Last year marked the 15th anniversary of prestigous Fat Cat imprint 130701, the label who brought the post-classical genre into full focus from luminaries Max Richter, Hauschka, Johann Johannsson, Dustin O’ Halloran et al. ‘A 130701 Mix’ compiled by one of the label’s latest additions, gifted Montreal-based, French composer Olivier Alary and is a gleaming treasure of contemporary, soul-stirring cinematic soundscapes from 130701’s vast discography (mixing the label’s newer signings: Polish cellist Resina, Russian pianist Dmitry Evgrafov, French composer Emilie Levienaise, multi-layered vocalist/composer Ian William Craig and Olivier’s own solo works together with alumni artists Set Fire to Flames (the label’s first release back in 13th July 2001, hence the label’s cryptic name) alongside Germany’s Hauschka, Max Richter, Johann Johannsson and Sylvain Chauveau.

The Montreal-based composer’s new solo full-length ‘Fiction/Non-Fiction’ is a stunningly beautiful electro-acoustic voyage that possesses a lyrical quality at every turn (throughout the album’s diverse seventeen sonic pieces) that shines forth its rich warm textures and immaculate instrumentation (piano, accordion, saxophone, slide guitar, marimba, guitar, electronics, choir, flute and clarinet) akin to pulses of radiant light casting deep inner reflections. The orchestrated moments (performed by Babelsberg Filmorchestra and The Wroclaw Score Orchestra) delves the listener deep into a realm of drone-filled modern-classical wonder, evoking the timeless spirit of A Winged Victory For The Sullen or Johann Johannsson (particularly on the album’s centrepiece ‘Autodrome’.

The wide range of colours and textures masterfully unveiled throughout ‘Fiction/NonFiction’ vast sonic palette is one of the record’s great hallmarks. Shimmering noise amidst harmonic patterns unfold on ‘Khaltoum’ that gorgeously fades into the soaring beauty of ‘Arrivee’ (the majestic piano tones and strings could be taken from Johannsson’s latest sonic masterpiece, ‘Orphee’). Shimmering clean electric guitar tones echo on ‘Nollywood’ as the track builds, electronic/noise elements coalesce effortlessly conjuring up the windswept beauty of Set Fire to Flames or Sylvain Chauveau in the process. The record is meticulously crafted: pristine woodwind and accordion motifs are weaved together on ‘Yu Shui’ with dream-like, fantastical strings and the joyous rejoice of Pulses (for winds) reveal fluid-like rhythmic pulses of flute and clarinet. The French composer’s solo work (following on from his towering explorations under the alias of Ensemble) navigates paths less-traveled as boundaries become blurred wherein traditional and experimental worlds exist beautifully together.

‘Fiction/Non-Fiction’ by Olivier Alary is out now on 130701.

http://www.olivieralary.com/

http://130701.com/

 

 

Olivier Alary – A 130701 Mix

Tracklist:

  1. Set Fire to Flames “Mouths trapped in static”
  2. Ian William Craig “Innermost”
  3. Sylvain Chauveau “N B”
  4. Max Richter “Ionosphere”
  5. Hauschka “Eltern.2”
  6. Set Fire to Flames “Holy Throat Hiss Tracts To The Sedative Hypnotic”
  7. Set Fire to Flames “Deja, Comme Des Trous De Vent, comme reproduit”
  8. Resina “Tatry I”
  9. Emilie Levienaise-Farrouch “Tulsi”
  10. Sylvain Chauveau “Noir”
  11. Max Richter “A Song For H / Far Away”
  12. Dmitry Edrgadov “Garage”
  13. Ian William Craig “A Single Hope” (Olivier Alary remix)
  14. Sylvain Chauveau “Au Nombre des Choses”
  15. Johann Johannsson “An Injury To One Is The Concern Of All”
  16. Dustin O’ Halloran “A Great Divide”
  17. Set Fire To Flames “Rites of Spring Reverb”
  18. Ian William Craig “An Ocean Only You Could See”
  19. Olivier Alary “Pulses (for wind)”
  20. Set Fire to Flames “I will be true”
  21. Resina “Afterimage”
  22. Emilie Levienaise “Farrouch – Cotidal Lines”
  23. Max Richter “Song / Flowers for Yulia”
  24. Set Fire to Flames “This Thing Between Us is a rickety bridge of impossible crossing”
  25. Ian William Craig “Set to lapse”

‘Fiction/Non-Fiction’ by Olivier Alary is out now on 130701.

http://www.olivieralary.com/

http://130701.com/

 

Chosen One: Saltland

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And that’s what I love about music is trying to transcend or get out of this reality and move yourself and channel something deeper and find emotional depth within it.”

Rebecca Foon

Words: Mark Carry

Rebecca playing cello

Rebecca Foon’s second album as Saltland unfolds a deeply moving and intense journey, which forges an indelible imprint on one’s heart and mind. ‘A Common Truth’ centers on climate change and the state of the world (issues which Foon has worked tirelessly on over the years as an activist, organizer and co-founder of Pathway To Paris and several other environmental groups). The message of ‘A Common Truth’ resonates powerfully: Humanity needs to act urgently in order to save our planet Earth.

Employing the Montreal composer’s looped layers of cello and voice, stunningly beautiful cello soundscapes furl into the atmosphere as a transcendent flow of captivating strings is channelled from deep within the cosmos. An undeniable force is formed when Foon’s beguiling vocals blend with her layered cello instrumentation. On the achingly beautiful lament ‘Light Of Mercy’, Foon asks “How did we get ourselves here?” beneath mesmeric passages of brooding strings, akin to a late night vigil or desperate prayer to mother Earth. A deeply moving, meditative quality permeates throughout Foon’s otherworldly song cycles, capturing a rich intensity and raw emotion at every turn.

A striking intimacy prevails throughout ‘A Common Truth’. The hypnotic wordless vocals of album opener ‘To Allow Us All To Breathe’ flickers like stars dotted across a night sky. ‘I Only Wish This For You’ is a deeply affecting exploration that navigates the depths of human darkness where a vivid colours of hopelessness and despair engulf the utterly transporting sonic layers (bringing to mind the likes of Dirty Three, Rachel’s and Sarah Neufeld’s solo works).

A Common Truth’ features multi-instrumentalist Warren Ellis (Dirty Three, The Bad Seeds) on several tracks, further heightening Foon’s divine tapestry of enchanting sounds. The renowned Australian composer’s instrumentation of violin, pump organ and loops supplies rich textures for Foon’s voice and cello; the record shares the gripping intensity of the scores penned by Nick Cave & Warren Ellis, creating, in turn, a timeless journey that forever orbits an ethereal realm.

‘A Common Truth’ is out now on Constellation.

http://www.saltland.ca/

http://cstrecords.com/

SALTLAND6

 

Interview with Rebecca Foon (Saltland).

 

Congratulations on the new Saltland album ‘A Common Truth’, it’s such a gripping and moving journey. Please discuss for me the making of the new record, Rebecca?

Rebecca Foon: Well basically, I was writing this album mostly in 2015 and at the same time I was working quite heavily on organizing with my partner Jessica Smith a concert in Paris at the lead-up to the UN climate change. I do a lot of work in Climate and Change as well so I had that on my mind a lot so it was pieces of creative expression on what was heavy on my mind at that time, and still to this day. And also, it’s a wonderful way for me to challenge myself in different musical ways with singing and writing lyrics and trying to sing on top of my cello playing with loops. And then four songs were co-written by a friend Warren Ellis and that was really a project I worked with him on those four songs and we would send files back and forth. I just really admire his playing and it was such a wonderful opportunity.

I love how the album itself the mix between the voice and instrumentals – it works so wonderfully – and how  you’re able to blend your voice with the cello instrument is amazing and how it comes back and forth throughout the record at different points.

RF: That’s so nice, thank you. It’s definitely been a fun process. It’s challenging for sure because it’s new territory for me but also really exciting and fun.

In terms of the lyrical content – you’ve already mentioned – is stemmed from the world as it is present and climate change, and the effect of these lyrics they really hit you. And more so, the message of the album is very hard-hitting, which is a good thing obviously.

RF: I’m so glad to hear that and your feedback, thank you.

Your approach to writing these pieces, how challenging must it have been to write the different layers to these compositions? It’s a process you must be getting more and more used to?

RF: Yeah it’s interesting because I wrote the lyrics before the music except for that song ‘Light Of Mercy’ which I wrote at the same time. But that song – unlike any of the other songs on the album – just came out, which was very interesting, that was probably the easiest song to write like it truly just came out of me. The other songs, the lyrics I wrote first and then wrote the music and then I would sing on top. I was writing the layers – like a cello groove happening, like a world of cello sounds – that I could then try and sing on top of and then I would flesh them out in the studio.

But because with music – like the melodies and chords –there are no words so it can take you into this trip, playing this. And that’s what I love about music is trying to transcend or get out of this reality and move yourself and channel something deeper and find emotional depth within it. And for the lyrics, writing the lyrics for me there was that poetic element but also because I was tapping into this really real, raw feeling around climate change and the state of the world with a sense of urgency. I think that’s what’s different about this album is like for me and where I’m at I really feel a strong sense of urgency, for humanity to act and I feel very compelled to channel that within my music. And so within that there is definitely a bit of a cerebral element to the lyrics like I’d find my own creativity within it and poetic feeling within that, there is almost an intellectual component to it. But then the music is quite a different experiment and then trying to bring them together was a fun challenge because it’s using two different parts of the brain in a way.

With the input of Warren Ellis as well, I wonder did you have him in mind or particular parts in mind for him before the songs were completed or was it towards the end of the process?

RF:  It was quite organic. Before writing the album, I always wanted to invite him to be part of it but I wanted this album to be very stripped down like on my first album, quite  few friends of mine play on it but this album I wanted to be much more intimate and much more of a cello vocal record. But I always had the intention of inviting Warren to be part of it and then the organic part of it is this concert I organized in Paris with my partner Jesse, Warren ended up performing at it – which was also spontaneous – and that concert was like a unique concert because it was during the UN Climate Change conference and it was really to highlight the importance of establishing the Paris Agreement. So, we had that connection then and so from there, it all came together organically.

The intimacy and just how raw the journey is really is striking. The album has a similar feel to scores by Nick Cave & Warren Ellis as the intensity really hits you.

RF:  I mean I’m really inspired by them and the emotional depth that they can convey in their music is very powerful. I think with the first record, it was my first time doing that world of cello and voice and writing songs from that foundation. I brought in a lot of friends for that record [‘I Thought It Was Us But It Was All Of Us’] because I really wanted to try to not hide away from anything and try to really get to the essence of what I’m trying to channel without trying to vary it in any way and not being scared of that being raw or naked or whatever it is you know. I’m glad that you find that come through; it’s rewarding to hear that.

You’re part of so many groups and bands and being part of the wonderful music scene in Montreal, I suppose all these different projects must feed into one another; as you’re finishing one thing, you’re beginning something else almost at the same time?

RF: Yeah, definitely and that’s quite beautiful because it’s all inter-connected like all the music is connected and everyone’s stories are woven together like my solo record, I would never would have created what I created if it wasn’t for everything; all the experiences that I’ve had leading up to it, which is a beautiful thing about life and the scripts of our lives, it’s so magical in a way.

Would you have memories of first learning music or discovering music in the first place?

RF: Well I started when I was eight. I had a funny story where I don’t come from a musical family. So I started playing cello because I went to a school that had a string programme and so I saw the cello and I totally fell in love with it and then I told my family that I wanted to play that instrument and they were like ‘What’s that? It’s so big’ [laughs] So, because of that experience, I really believe in public education because I never would have had the experience of playing music if I hadn’t had access to that as a kid. And playing a string instrument, it’s hard to start it when you’re older, even when I was eight that was quite old to start playing a stringed instrument so I always felt like I started way too old.

Just thinking of today and the last few years, it’s amazing too with just the cello instrument alone, how much wonderful music is being made with the cello.

RF: Totally because when I was growing up, there was not like the language of cello – it wasn’t violin even – it felt like classical was the way and anything else didn’t exist. There was no musical language outside of classical music like when I was growing up. I decided to not pursue classical music and so that was hard for me because I didn’t have a lot of reference points in the cello community but now that’s changing. It’s still not huge but there’s definitely more out there that I’m inspired by, for sure.

You’re probably touring the album ‘A Common Truth’ quite soon as well?

RF:  Yeah, I’m doing one-off shows and I’ll probably open up for Esmerine on tour. I’ll do my album launch in North America, in Montreal and New York.

Do you have favourite albums at the moment that you’re listening to?

RF: Yeah I guess for me within the Constellation/Montreal world, I’m really inspired by Matana Roberts and Colin Stetson. I love the new Bad Seeds record ‘The Skeleton Tree’, I love some other stuff on Constellation like Jerusalem In My Heart and I love listening to old albums like Mary Margaret O’ Hara ‘Miss America’, I love Marvin Gaye, Neil Young [laughs], I always go back to classic records that inspire me. But you know I have to say something about Marvin Gaye because there is this one album when you listen to his lyrics – it’s super-trippy – he references environmental degradation a lot on some of the songs. It’s interesting that you can go back to some albums from way back and it’s fixed like where we are now as a society. I love Sarah Neufeld and there’s some very interesting female solo albums put out now that makes me feel happy, who are doing things untraditionally like going for it.

There’s a lovely parallel between you and Sarah Neufeld and it shows just how much wonderful female solo artists there are making such important music.

RF: I think we inspire each other too and it keeps us engaged like seeing each other do it, inspires us to keep doing what we’re doing and it’s helpful to have friends in the community, it’s like a nice and supportive environment.

Lastly, you work so hard and well with all these issues concerning climate change, where do you see the state of the world as we are now and what do you hope for the next decade?

RF: Because I feel the urgency so strongly and because of the world right now with politics all over, I really believe – and part of me is because I am an optimist by nature – we can make it through but we can only make it through with really powerful collaboration and that needs to happen on a city level. And because federal politics are so murky right now and will probably continue to be murky for a while and we don’t have much time in order to avoid catastrophic climate change. I think what needs to happen – and this is what I’m working on with this organization that I’ve started Pathway to Paris – is really focusing on at a city level and I think that if cities can come together around the world and make commitments and action plans and implementation strategies to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions by 80-100% by 2050, I think that we will be OK.

If that can happen and it’s going to take flagship cities from all around the world to really start moving on that and for governments to support cities that don’t have funds to do it and have creative funding and creative mechanisms to help cities around the world to join in that effort because it’s much harder for cities like New York for example to make those kind of commitments and implement strategies and movement forward to move towards those kinds of reductions. But I really do think that if we can do that we’ll be OK but it needs to happen fast and it needs to happen very collaboratively. It’s exciting if it does because imagining cities that are not dependent on fossil fuels like that’s a pretty cool world, you can conquer a lot of problems at the same time reinventing those cities. So, for me that’s what excites me, to work towards that goal.

But I do think it requires a global effort and a global effort at this point. It’s unfortunate because with the state of the world right now with federal politics going more and more within federal boundaries and creating stronger and real walls to protect those boundaries but really the world needs to break away from all of that and think of us as a planet and think of it like a global picture to conquer this issue. And this issue is just a reflection of how we see the world, it’s showing us so strongly how we need to perceive the world but unfortunately the reaction is going in the opposite direction. But I do think there is hope there if we take another route, like the city route.

‘A Common Truth’ is out now on Constellation.

http://www.saltland.ca/

http://cstrecords.com/

Written by admin

April 4, 2017 at 6:38 pm