FRACTURED AIR

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Posts Tagged ‘Oliver Coates

Guest Mixtape: Oliver Coates

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Several ground-breaking records from 2016 can be attributed to the gifted talents of British cellist and composer Oliver Coates. The London-based composer’s sophomore full-length release ‘Upstepping’ is undoubtedly one of the year’s most accomplished, innovative and compelling musical journeys with its meticulously crafted and sumptuously layered cello-based compositions that carves out techno-fueled waves of pure bliss and transcendence. ‘Upstepping’ is indeed (in the words of Coates) “pumped-up body music”. In addition to ‘Upstepping’, Coates performed on Radiohead’s latest ‘A Moon Shaped Pool’ LP and most recently, a collaborative work with UK’s Mica Levi (Micachu & The Shapes) in the form of ‘Remain Calm’, another crowning jewel of 2016.

The British composer, producer and arranger is best known for his collaborative work with the London Contemporary Orchestra, Jonny Greenwood (‘The Master’ score) and Mica Levi (score for ‘Under The Skin’). On Coates’ latest solo masterwork ‘Upstepping’, A scintillating record of disparate influences is crafted where vital sounds of electronic and techno collide with neo-classical elements, which somehow feels closely adjacent to the works of Aphex Twin, Four Tet and Boards of Canada as it does to the modern-classical realm of today.

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We are delighted to present to you a special guest mix compiled by Oliver Coates. Below is Oliver’s description about this inspired selection of music:

Here is a panorama: the integration of human voice, real or concocted, as formant synthesis which binds instrumental haze beyond slamming rhythms and does wonders for the physiology. There are versions upon versions – distorted cello play over sequenced dance music is my current activity – where the cello intercedes as human element, using the bow as a Cirklon Sequencer. All the different attacks. Wahs and pointillisms, bulges, swells, sighs. Airs, ahs and pointed teeth. Polyphony like a baby’s mobile, Alexander Calder, hot and cold, monophonic bassline attitude underneath large and diffuse chords.”

—Oliver Coates

Oliver Coates – Fractured Air Mix – December 2016

01. Gecko Afterlife HD“Earth Jump” (YouTube)
02. AFX“simple slamming b 2” (Warp)
03. Levantis“Undr” (Technicolour)
04. Elysia Crampton“Dummy Track” (Break World)
05. Micachu feat. KEVIN“Clothes Wear Me” (adult swim)‎
06. Dean Blunt & Inga Copeland“9” (Hyperdub)
07. Boards of Canada“Dayvan Cowboy” (Warp)
08. My Bloody Valentine“To Here Knows When” (Creation)
09. Cocteau Twins“Pitch The Baby” (4AD)
10. DMX Krew“You Can’t Hide Your Love” (Hidden Love Mix) (Warp)
11. D’Breez – “Crazy for Love” (Autechre remix) (Skam)

‘Upstepping’ is out now on PRAH Recordings & ‘Remain Calm’ by Mica Levi & Oliver Coates is out now on Slip Discs.

Compiled by Oliver Coates, 2016. The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.

http://www.olivercoates.com/
https://www.facebook.com/olivercoatesmusician/

Written by admin

December 20, 2016 at 7:46 pm

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S01E11 | November mix

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fracturedair_nov16

November’s mixtape contains gorgeous new releases from a host of exceptional voices in today’s independent music world: the peerless L.A. composer and songwriter Julia Holter unveils her debut score (‘Bleed For This’, Milan Records); Australia-born & Berlin-based artist Carla dal Forno whose exceptional avant-pop debut full-length ‘You Know What It’s Like’ marks one of 2016’s finest LPs (Blackest Ever Black); the utterly compelling collaborative project between Mica Levi and Oliver Coates (in the form of ‘Remain Calm’, released recently via Slip) and A Winged Victory For The Sullen’s stunningly beautiful ‘Iris’ original score, which represents the prestigious duo’s third full length release (available digitally now).

Earlier this month marked the sad passing of Leonard Cohen at the age of 82. A true visionary and legendary songwriter, his last studio album ‘You Want It Darker’ was released just weeks before his untimely passing. Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau’s emotional tribute to his good friend echoes powerfully the vital importance of Cohen’s sacred songbook: “Leonard, no other artist’s poetry and music felt or sounded quite like yours. We’ll miss you.”

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S01E11 | November mix

To Read/listen on La Blogothèque:

http://www.blogotheque.net/2016/11/24/fractured-air-x-blogotheque-s01e11-november-mix/

 

Tracklisting:

01. DJ Shadow“The Mountain Will Fall” (Mass Appeal)
02. A Tribe Called Quest“The Space Program” (Epic)
03. Archangel“Julia” (Dean Blunt’s On Wine, Hashish & Molly Version Vinyl Edit) (Foom)
04. Underworld“Low Burn” (Universal Music Group)
05. Dead Light“Sleeper” (Village Green)
06. Carla dal Forno“Db Rip” (Blackest Ever Black)
07. Karen Marks“Cold Café” (Efficient Space)
08. Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith“Riparian” (Western Vinyl)
09. Mica Levi & Oliver Coates“Barok Main” (Slip)
10. Dungen“Peri Banu Vid Sjön” (Smalltown Supersound)
11. case/lang/veirs“Supermoon” (Anti-)
12. Tortoise (ft. Georgia Hubley)“Yonder Blue” (Thrill Jockey)
13. Fleetwood Mac“Albatross” (Reprise)
14. Lambchop “Writer” (Merge, City Slang)
15. Matt Robertson“Juno” (Tape Club)
16. Julia Holter“Home Movies” (Bleed For This OST, Milan)
17. Heather Woods Broderick“Glider” (Western Vinyl)
18. Loscil“Drained Lake” (Kranky)
19. A Winged Victory For The Sullen“Comme on a Dit” (Iris OST, Erased Tapes)
20. Leonard Cohen“String Reprise / Treaty” (Columbia, Sony Music)
21. Syrinx“December Angel” (excerpt) (RVNG Intl)

Compiled by Fractured Air, November 2016. The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.

http://www.blogotheque.net/
https://fracturedair.com/

 

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S01E09 | September mix

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fracturedair_sep16

We’re delighted to present two previously unreleased tracks for September’s mixtape, by Iceland-born cellist and composer Hildur Guðnadóttir and Portland Oregon-based artist Brumes.

For well over a decade now, Hildur Guðnadóttir has firmly established herself as one of the jewels in the crown of today’s independent music scene. Guðnadóttir’s remarkable artistry and versatility has been widely evident in her highly prolific recording output to date – whether in the form of solo works or her many collaborations – on labels such as Touch, Sonic Pieces and Oral Records. Guðnadóttir has released a string of formidable solo albums – from her landmark 2009 full-length “Without Sinking” to 2014’s “Saman” (both albums released via the world-renowned U.K. independent label Touch) and has collaborated with musicians including Hauschka (Dusseldorf’s Volker Bertelmann) and Iceland’s Jóhann Jóhannsson.

The moving composition “Fólk fær andlit” (translates to “People get Faces”) was originally published by Guðnadóttir to her YouTube page in April of 2016, in response to the series of events which unfolded in her native Iceland in December 2015, involving the deportation of Albanian children with terminal illnesses along with their families who had been denied residence permits (her heartfelt and eloquently written account of the inspiration to “Fólk fær andlit” can be read in full HERE).

Brumes are a three-piece based in Portland Oregon whose lineup comprises of lead songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Desireé Rousseau, Dalton Long (drums) and Nico Bartulski (keys). The band’s debut album “Soundings in Fathoms” was recorded by renowned producer (musician/composer) Peter Broderick at his home studio The Sparkle along the Oregon coast. “I’m Not Listening” was also recorded at The Sparkle by Peter Broderick.

Also featured in September’s mixtape are newly released gems by longtime indie greats Cass McCombs (“Mangy Love”, Anti-) and Woods (“City Sun Eater In The River of Light”, Woodsit); latest solo full-length by beloved Irish songwriter Lisa Hannigan (“At Swim”, Play It Again Sam); a pair of releases by the forever inspiring FatCat imprint 130701 (Warsaw-based cellist and composer Resina and Moscow-based pianist and multi-instrumentalist Dmitry Evgrafov). September also sees the welcome return of the hugely influential independent label Tomlab (The Books, Patrick Wolf, Final Fantasy) with Berlin-based electronic artist Heimer’s shape-shifting debut album “Teilzeit Swag”.

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S01E09 | September mix

To Read/listen on La Blogothèque:

http://www.blogotheque.net/2016/09/28/fractured-air-x-blogotheque-s01e09-september-mix/

 

Tracklisting:

01. Masayoshi Fujita & Jan Jelinek“Cin” (excerpt) (Faitiche)
02. Botany“Needam Wish To” (Western Vinyl)
03. The Avalanches“Saturday Night Inside Out” (XL Recordings)
04. Syrinx“Hollywood Dream Trip” (RVNG Intl)
05. Ashanti Roy“Hail The Words of Jah” (Soul Jazz)
06. Barbara Lynn“This Is The Thanks I Get” (Light In The Attic)
07. Woods“Sun City Creeps” (Woodsit)
08. Mr. Sweety “G”“At the Place to Be” (Soul Jazz)
09. Cass McCombs“Opposite House” (Anti-)
10. Angel Olsen“Woman” (Jagjaguwar)
11. Lisa Hannigan“Ora” (Play It Again Sam / ATO)
12. Resina“Afterimage” (130701)
13. Hildur Guðnadóttir“Fólk fær andlit” (Unreleased)
14. Adam Bryanbaum Wiltzie“Lithium, The New Era” (Erased Tapes)
15. Brumes“I’m Not Listening” (Unreleased)
16. Fiona Brice“Dallas” (Digital 21 + Stefan Olsdal Remix) (Bella Union)
17. Cat Power“Say” (Matador)
18. ISAN“Napier Deltic” (Morr Music)
19. Forma“Maxwell’s Demon” (Kranky)
20. Jackie Lynn“Alien Love” (Thrill Jockey)
21. Craig Leon“Details Suggest Fidelity To Fact” (RVNG Intl)
22. Heimer“Icy Grip” (Tomlab)
23. Zomby & Banshee“Fly 2” (Hyperdub)
24. Oliver Coates“STASH” (PRAH Recordings)
25. Mogwai“U-235” (Atomic OST, Rock Action)
26. Katie Kim“FOREIGN FLEAS” (Bandcamp)
27. Eluvium“Strangeworks” (Temporary Residence)
28. Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds“Distant Sky” (Bad Seed Ltd.)
29. Dmitry Evgrafov“The Lofty Sky” (130701)
30. Irene Buckley“Waiting” (House of Usher extract) (Soundcloud)
31. Arvo Pärt“My Heart’s In The Highlands” (Else Torp, Christopher Bowers-Broadbent) (Harmonia Mundi)
32. Jóhann Jóhannsson“Good Night, Day” (Deutsche Grammophon)

Compiled by Fractured Air, September 2016. The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.

http://www.blogotheque.net/
https://fracturedair.com/

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S1E6 | June mix

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fracturedairmix_june16

We’re delighted to present two exclusive tracks by the world-renowned Berlin-based contemporary classical music collective stargaze. Founded by German conductor André de Ridder, stargaze comprise a network of classically trained European musicians who have performed and collaborated extensively in a wide variety of contexts to date.

The German-based collective have worked with some of the most acclaimed and forward-thinking contemporary music-makers, including: Julia Holter, Nils Frahm, Bryce Dessner, Sonic Youth’s Lee Ranaldo, A Hawk and a Hacksaw, Shara Worden, Owen Pallett, These New Puritans and many more; and have appeared at prestigious festivals and venues including: the Holland Festival, Barbican Centre London, Acht-Brücken-Festival at Cologne Philharmonie, Crossing Borders Festival, Wonderfeel Festival, Kaltern Pop Festival, Berlin Pop-Kultur, Rewire Festival (NL).

Another vital element of the stargaze repertoire in recent years has been amassing their considerable collection of instrumental works. These have included: Deerhof Chamber Variations by Greg Saunier; string quartets by Sufjan Stevens and Bryce Dessner as well as David Lang’s composition Death Speaks; Mica Levi’s Under The Skin and Richard Reed Parry’s Music for Heart and Breath.

Presented exclusively for June’s mixtape are stargaze’s analogue arrangements of Boards of Canada’s EP “Hi Scores”, performed live at Motel Mozaïque in Rotterdam during April 2016. Arrangements are by Aart Strootman.

Staying in Berlin, also included in June’s mixtape is the highly acclaimed Hamburg-born and Berlin-based guitarist and composer Martyn Heyne who released his gorgeous debut solo E.P. “Shady & Light” this year (available as a free download from http://martynheyne.com). Heyne has long been associated with countless musicians in the independent music scene as they have recorded at Lichte, Heyne’s Berlin-based home studio (Sarah Neufeld, Nils Frahm, Lubomyr Melnyk, Peter Broderick). Heyne was also a touring member with Danish group Efterklang during their 2013 “Piramida” tour.

Finally, June also saw the release of Irish songwriter Brigid Mae Power’s masterful self-titled album (her first for U.S. independent Tompkins Square). The album was recorded in 2015 with Peter Broderick at The Sparkle, his hometown studio in Portland, Oregon.

 

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S1E6 | June mix

To Read/listen on La Blogothèque:

http://www.blogotheque.net/2016/06/27/fractured-air-x-blogotheque-s01e06-june-mix/

 

Tracklisting:

01. Brigid Mae Power“Watching The Horses” (Tompkins Square)
02. Sarah Neufeld“Chase the Bright and Burning” (Paper Bag)
03. The Flaming Lips “The Observer” (Warner Bros.)
04. s t a r g a z e“Everything You Do Is A Balloon” (live at Motel Mozaïque, Rotterdam, 09/04/16)
05. Arthur Russell“Instrumentals – 1974 Volume 1” (Rough Trade, Audika)
06. Oliver Coates“Innocent Love” (PRAH Recordings)
07. Jessy Lanza“It Means I Love You” (Hyperdub)
08. Moderat “Finder” (Monkeytown)
09. Jamie xx & Four Tet“SeeSaw” (feat. Rome) [Club Version] (Young Turks)
10. Kiasmos “Swayed” (Erased Tapes)
11. Ólafur Arnalds & Nils Frahm“23:52” (Erased Tapes)
12. Boards Of Canada“Sunshine Recorder” (Warp)
13. Radiohead“Full Stop” (XL Recordings)
14. Explosions In The Sky“The Ecstatics” (Bella Union)
15. MJ Guider“Lit Negative” (Kranky)
16. Julee Cruise“Mysteries Of Love” (Warner Bros.)
17. Angel Olsen“Intern” (Jagjaguwar)
18. Martyn Heyne“Brandung” (http://martynheyne.com)
19. Roslyn Steer“Of A Sunday” (Kantcope)
20. Bob Dylan“Final Theme” (Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid OST, Columbia)
21. s t a r g a z e“Nlogax / Turquoise Hexagon Sun” (live at Motel Mozaïque, Rotterdam, 09/04/16)
22. Bill Fay“The Sun Is Bored” (Deram, Decca)
23. Amiina“Kola” (Lighthouse Version) (Sound Of A Handshake)

Compiled by Fractured Air, June 2016. The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.

http://www.blogotheque.net/
https://fracturedair.com/

Step Right Up: Oliver Coates

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Interview with Oliver Coates.

“I still think of myself of an interpreter, always channelling something from outside of me.”

—Oliver Coates

Words: Mark Carry

Oliver Coates by Gaelle Beri 2015-5

My first introduction to Oliver Coates’s music came in the form of a rather splendid mixtape compiled by British composer and organist James Mc Vinnie. The appropriately titled mix, Music for Travel consisted of Coates’s utterly beguiling cello-based composition ‘The Room is the Resonator’ as the fitting opening track. A gorgeous ebb and flow of mournful cello strings coalesces effortlessly with gentle ambient pulses and field recordings, evoking the sound world of Brooklyn-based cellist Julia Kent and Canadian violinist Sarah Neufeld. A returning motif of fragile cello pizzicato forms the pulsing heart of this incredible composition that not only signifies music for travel but music for motion of the beating heart and stirring soul.

The London-based cellist, composer and producer has released records on PRAH Recordings – an offshoot of the legendary Moshi Moshi label – and SLIP and in addition, his collaborative work with the London Contemporary Orchestra, Jonny Greenwood (‘The Master’ score) and Mica Levi (score for ‘Under The Skin’). The gifted composer’s first full-length ‘Towards the blessed islands’ was Prah’s first release and earlier this month saw the eagerly-awaited new solo full-length, ‘Upstepping’. A scintillating record of disparate influences where vital sounds of electronic and techno collide with neo-classical elements, which somehow feels closely adjacent to the works of Aphex Twin, Four Tet and Boards of Canada as it does to the modern-classical realm of today.

Coates has described ‘Upstepping’ as “pumped-up body music”. The record’s meticulously crafted and sumptuously layered tracks forms a lovely parallel with Four Tet’s ‘There Is Love In You’ LP, the early Warp output and Canadian artists of Dan Snaith’s Caribou and Owen Pallett’s otherworldly odysseys. The album opener ‘Innocent Love’ feels a lost companion piece to Kieran Hebden’s ‘There Is Love In You’ opus with a hypnotic female vocal line delicately placed in the forefront of the mix alongside a deep bass groove and utterly transcendent cello sections. ‘Innocent Love’ epitomises the inventive spirit and deeply engaging voyage that ‘Upstepping’ takes you on, transitioning between many musical forms in the process.

A myriad of warm textures and flourishes are masterfully embedded in the following cut of ‘Timelapse’, which maps the cherished memories of childhood as the radiant warmth of nostalgia permeates each and every aching pore of this joyously uplifting electronica exploration. ‘Bambi 2046’ contains looped samples and meditative strings that evokes the neo-classical splendour of Jóhann Jóhannsson’s ‘IBM 1401, A User’s Manual’ culminating in a glorious crescendo of distorted strings. Deeper house grooves are employed in ‘Perfect Love’ with scintillating techno beats reminiscent of master producers DJ Koze, Mathew Herbert et al. The masterful transition to the brooding cinematic soundscapes of ‘Memorial to Hitchens’ reflects the soaring emotional depth and rich intensity of ‘Upstepping’. The gradual strings and enveloping emotion of ‘Memorial to Hitchens’ shares the immaculate beauty of A Winged Victory For The Sullen’s modern-classical masterworks.

‘Upstepping’ is out now on PRAH Recordings.

http://www.olivercoates.com/

https://www.facebook.com/olivercoatesmusician/

Oliver Coates by Gaelle Beri 2015-1

Interview with Oliver Coates.

Congratulations on the truly stunning new record, ‘Upstepping’. One of the great hallmarks of this new full-length is the marvellous marriage of the dance sphere and modern-classical realm; a voyage brimming with ideas, sonic nuances, textures and intricate detail. Please take me back to the recording sessions of ‘Upstepping’ and the main objectives and desires you wished for this solo effort? I wonder were any challenges posed during the making of these compositions?

Oliver Coates: It was an out-of-my-head combination of recording sessions, writing sessions and mixing sessions mixed up into one type of behaviour. There was a laptop, mic and cello, sometimes working all night sometimes grabbing 5 minutes to write a new pattern. There was never a plan – only a desire to make the music come to life. I had more, ambient, noise and dance tracks and then Stephen from PRAH helped me pick for this. Lawrence’s artwork completed it. Desiring the track to exist, for it to be satisfying, a kind of internal ecology with the materials, I don’t think about where it’s going to go or who it’s for. Except maybe for my wife and Stephen. The most intense periods alone, making and listening, were in Hong Kong late 2014, Egypt – a couple of days in 2015, and Waterloo summer 2015. I listened to a whole USB stick of Egyptian pop in the desert in a taxi one day and I learnt a lot from that.

Two sister tracks that feel the vital pulse to ‘Upstepping’ are the sublime techno-infused explorations of ‘Innocent Love’ and ‘Perfect Love’. If there ever was an opener to a record it would be ‘Innocent Love; conjuring up the sound of Four Tet at his finest. Can you talk me through the various layers of these particular tracks, Oliver? In terms of the cello instrumentation, how much of these tracks contain cello and what ways do you treat and process the cello sound? A beautifully euphoric sound radiates throughout and reflects the dynamic and shape-shifting sound of ‘Upstepping’.

OC: Four Tet’s arrangement and editing of sampled sound has an intuitive sense and flow which impacts the way I play the instrument. The practice of taking old sounds, chopping them up, and reconfiguring them digitally until it sounds natural and spontaneous has had an impact on my bowing technique on the old wooden analogue instrument. Maybe this is ironic but to me it feels obvious – the manner in which you approach any instrument which makes its acoustic sound, body language, repetition, improvisation, reduction, ornamentation (or special effect), continues to evolve even if you don’t update the technology – I play on a normal old cello with four steel strings. The microscopic and infinite ways you can vary the attack; you can repeat as if you yourself have been sampled – these electronic processes from the last 40 years affect my work – they set the bar higher. Right now I think a lot about arpeggiators as used by Boards of Canada and also Shackleton’s percussion patterns.

I’m not really sure how I made Innocent Love. I remember walking around Hong Kong Island through the night listening to different mixes.

‘Timelapse’ transitions effortlessly between warm, inventive electronica and luminous ambient flourishes. It feels there are several distinct sections contained within this one piece. For example, I love the middle section’s rhythmic groove and the final – what feels to be – soothing synth passages. In terms of constructing ‘Timelapse’, does a gradual process lie at the heart of layering/fusing the many elements together?

OC: The structure for that track revealed itself quite quickly. Staying in one hotel for a couple of nights when we found the home we had just completed on – our first flat – had been completely flooded out. There’s a repeating sample of a child talking that got in there. Instantly that takes me back to early ’90s Aphex and how to straddle that feeling of innocent bright melody and something a bit sinister creeping along.

Upon many revisits of ‘Upstepping’, the spirit of Arthur Russell most certainly feels present, floating through the ether. Again, it’s the many transitioning styles, contrasts, and moods that morph together throughout the record. Can you discuss for me your approach to the cello instrument and the different techniques or processes you have developed when it comes to performing on this instrument?

OC: The cello is often recorded then transposed to another pitch digitally. There are a lot of notes in this record tuned away from the 12 semitones, microtonally shunted around. It keeps the harmonies alive, pitches have more magnetism or so the intervals between them, being reconfigured from the 12 notes of the piano. Cello unadorned plus beats direct and simple hasn’t yet gelled for me. I don’t know if it will. I add a tonne of processing until it feels right. But the best technique of all is the oldest – slowing down or speeding up recordings. Jonny Greenwood does that too when he records strings. Listen to The Master- things are not quite what they seem. For me it sounds good to record a long pure tone like a harmonic then pull it down to the bass register. You bring these spectral colours down too, into the mid-range. You’re more aware of a spectrum soaked in adjacent tones.

The aesthetic and feel to the new record is another important aspect to the sense of journey the music takes you on. For instance, the placing of the more neo-classical-based pieces, ‘Memorial to Hitchens’ and ‘The Irish Book Of Death & Flying Ships’ (and also, the fragile closing lament of ‘Rise and Fall’ embody the emotive and deeply affecting nature of the music. Can you shed some light on the narrative to these particular pieces? The spoken word segments on the latter works so beautifully, evoking the works of Gavin Bryars and Steve Reich along the way.

OC: If there’s a narrative then it’s personal – a lot has changed recently. I still think of myself of an interpreter, always channelling something from outside of me. And not knowing what kind of musician I am. That way I’m going to keep listening and not just churning music out – listening to nature most of all, but also the rhythms of other people as they go about their lives. The poet Alice Oswald speaks well about this. So much is indirect – I made Rise & Fall in a cupboard in 20 minutes while I was waiting for some dancers to warm up. My brother-in-law heard it playing out of my laptop speakers a few months later and took interest in it so I asked if we could add it on the end of the record.

Please discuss your love for dance music and the more techno-infused sound worlds you obviously have such a strong affinity for? Who would have been the most ground-breaking producers and dance records for you when it came to forming the direction of ‘Upstepping’?

OC: I never consciously formed a direction but I’ve always loved fast dance music. I used to have Moving Shadow & Metalheadz compilations on cassette but I think the Come to Daddy EP was a big moment for my head. I was mostly playing Shostakovich cello music at the time so it was weird to try to make sense of the two. Burial, we had some at our wedding, Enya too.

The album’s penultimate track ‘Stash’ for me is the record’s defining moment. The otherworldly dimension and sense of movement captured is revelatory. I wonder would it be a case of finding one or two motifs – whether it’s a cello-based melodic pattern or some interesting sample – where you then piece these elements together and in turn, embed these into a rhythmic structure? It feels there must be some difficulty in piecing together these various sections whilst retaining the liquid state of the music?

OC: Everything was arranged sound by sound on a timeline. This was the last track I made. The most live cello playing is in the sliding sounds near the beginning, between snatches of conversation and found sound. Then the big melody in the middle bit is a cello harmonic played through an arpeggiator in different patterns. I now have a new version for live performance of this track with new live harmonised cello layers and dubby delays – it’s starting to sound more tropical, maybe this is my seapunk record. I have some great new pressure-sensitive devices which are helping me perform these sounds live.

I must ask you about your collaborative work, if you don’t mind Oliver. I’m a huge fan of your collaborative work with Jonny Greenwood and Mica Levi. These scores represent some of the most deeply affecting, adventurous, compelling and timeless soundtracks of recent times. Can you recount your memories of working with Mica and Jonny on some of these scores, for which you must have some particularly strong memories for (‘Under The Skin’, ‘The Master’ to name two)?

OC: It’s mostly nonverbal. There’s a curious magic to it – a kind of quick-read knowingness and a sort of quiet understanding. Pieces of paper with different musical cues. Sometimes these feel finished and polished on the page or sometimes they are a starting point. A studio with lots of mics and some great freelance players getting together. You figure out as quick as you can what to do, where you can help most in each track. A good thing about both Mica and Jonny is they don’t talk much, they listen hard and they trust. They let go and want to do what you can with the notation (obey it precisely with lots of dynamics I find is the best) until it starts to fit with the mood of the scene. With the Under the Skin I enjoyed going in and multi-tracking Mica’s viola playing with my harmonics. Jonny and Mica both play viola very well (amongst many other instruments). Funny that.

‘Upstepping’ is out now on PRAH Recordings.

http://www.olivercoates.com/

https://www.facebook.com/olivercoatesmusician/

 

 

 

 

Written by admin

May 30, 2016 at 6:54 pm