FRACTURED AIR

The universe is making music all the time

Posts Tagged ‘Morr Music

Mixtape: Fractured Air – April 2020

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fracturedair_april20

It’s been a while. The beautiful light of spring has finally descended upon us; filling the void (of current circumstance) with birdsong, blooming flowers, blue skies and all signs of glittering life. Even though nature does not mirror the dark surface that permeates all of our lives at this present moment; remember all things must pass. These days offer moments of introspection and quiet: to be at peace with your own self during this slowed down, prolonged period.

The art of music remains a trusted constant. Light In The Attic’s lovingly assembled compilation of Seattle-based recording engineer Kearney Barton is an exceptional document of divine pop, soul and R&B spanning the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s. ‘Architect of the Northwest Sound’ is filled with a seamless array of timeless musical discoveries.
Another essential compilation is Morr Music’s soon-to-be-released ‘Minna Miteru’: collection of hard to find music from the Japanese independent scene, compiled by Saya, who plays in the iconic duo Tenniscoats. We have an exclusive track (peformed by Takako Minekawa and Dustin Wong) on this month’s mix.

The L.A-based composer Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith’s shape-shifting sonic explorations continue to evolve on her Ghostly debut ‘Expanding Electricity’: an epic and enriching foray into visionary fourth world dimensions. Essential. Russian electronic musician Kate NV’s forthcoming full-length ‘Room for the Moon’ on Brooklyn music institution RVNG Intl represents another singular voice in the contemporary musical landscape of today.

The debut collaboration of Australian drummer Jim White (Dirty Three/Xylouris White) and renowned guitarist Marisa Anderson arrives soon on the legendary Chicago label Thrill Jockey (and first single ‘The Lucky’ offers the first glimpses into this enchanting body of work). Cellist Helen Money’s new Thrill Jockey full-length and Rebecca Foon’s latest Constellation solo release are things of beauty and boundless magnitude.

Inventions is the immense collaborative duo of Matthew Robert Cooper (Eluvium) and Mark T. Smith (Explosions In The Sky). Their new single ‘Outlook for the Future’ is a joyous, uplifting sonic voyage. “What is your outlook for the future?” is asked beneath colourful woodwind patterns and rhythmic pulses, before an elderly female voice responds: “I don’t worry about the future”. Live in the present: in the here and now. Music never ceases to surprise and awaken something deep inside of us all.

 

Fractured Air – April 2020 Mix

01. Ann Wilson & The Daybreaks ‘Through Eyes and Glass’ (Light In The Attic)
02. Maki Asakawa ‘No Ga Kowai’ (Honest Jon’s)
03. Takako Minekawa & Dustin Wong ‘Party On A Floating Cake’ (Morr Music)
04. Kate NV ‘Sayonara’ (RVNG Intl)
05. Inventions ‘Outlook for the Future’ (Temporary Residence)
06. Group Listening ‘A Little Lost’ (PRAH)
07. Cate Le Bon & Group Listening ‘Here It Comes Again’ (Mexican Summer)
08. Hamish Kilgour ‘Crazy Radiance’ (Ba Da Bing!)
09. Arthur Russell ‘You Did It Yourself’ (Audika)
10. Yves Tumor ‘Gospel For A New Future’ (Warp)
11. El Michel’s Affair ‘Rubix’ (Big Crown Records)
12. MF Doom ‘Ninjarous’ (30th Century Records)
13. Four Tet ‘Something in the Sadness’ (Text)
14. Cucina Povera ‘Saniaiset’ (Night School)
15. Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith ‘Expanding Electricity’ (Ghostly)
16. Laraaji ‘Hare Jaya Jaya Rama II’ (Numero Group)
17. Drab City ‘Working For The Men’ (Bella Union)
18. 24 Carat Black ‘You’re Slipping Away’ (Numero Group)
19. Pentangle ‘Light Flight’ (Sanctuary)
20. Jim White and Marisa Anderson ‘The Lucky’ (Thrill Jockey)
21. Enablers ‘Even Its Lies’ (Lancashire And Somerset)
22. Helen Money ‘One Year One Ring’ (Thrill Jockey)
23. Rebecca Foon ‘Ocean Song’ (Constellation)
24. A Winged Victory For The Sullen ‘Adios, Florida’ (Ninja Tune)
25. Brian Eno ‘Deep Blue Day’ (Editions EG)
26. Tropical Rainstorm ‘Flying Bird’ (Light In The Attic)
27. Aoife Nessa Frances ‘Less Is More’ (Basin Rock)
28. Dark Arts ‘The More Things Stay The Same’ (STROOM)
29. Windy & Carl ‘Crossing Over’ (Kranky)
30. Colin Self ‘Once More’ (RVNG Intl)

Chosen One: Örvar Smárason

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A lot of it depends on letting myself get into the situation where I can let things happen on their own, if that makes any sense.”

Örvar Smárason

Words: Mark Carry

4.by Birgisdóttir Ingibjörg

Light Is Liquid’ is the gorgeous debut solo album from one of the key musical figures in Iceland’s music community over the past two decades (with his bands múm, FM Belfast among others).

The lead single ‘Photoelectric’ begins with irresistible electronic pop hooks before guest vocalist Sillus further heightens the transcendental pop dimension. “Tell me a story” are the first words uttered; Örvar Smárason’s debut solo album feels like eight scintillating folk pop songs for the modern world. The myriad of warm textures and luminous beats evokes a dichotomy of worlds wherein radiant light and shimmering darkness become effortlessly fused across the record’s sublime sonic tapestry. Later, hypnotic vocoder processing ascends onto the infectious chorus (with the gorgeous refrain of “I’m not in love”) that conjures up the timeless ambient pop creations of French duo Air in all its glory.

Tiny Moon’ serves part A’s defining moments with elements of Italo, 80’s synth pop and minimal wave to masterful effect. The luminous ballad – and duet with JFDR – seeps into your veins and very being. The meditative chorus refrain of “light is liquid/ when you are young” serves the record’s fitting prologue, in many ways,as the listener is transported to astral planes of new horizons.

The duo of ‘The Duality Paradox’ and ‘Flesh & Dreams’ offers ‘Light Is Liquid’s pulsing heart. A hypnotic vocoder line flows throughout the electronic pop flow of enchanting soundscapes; belonging to some otherworldly, mysterious android music. ‘Flesh & Dreams’ (featuring Sillus) is an utterly bewitching, precious pop gem, reminiscent of Smárason’s FM Belfast project and the leading lights of the Icelandic community as a whole. An achingly beautiful soulful dimension lies in the foundations of the synth pop lattice. Joyously uplifting.

The epic closer ‘Cthulhu Regio’ chronicles the exploration through the depths of darkness to find the eternal light of hope. The deeply affecting chorus refrain of “There will be light in the end” – which drifts majestically amidst the shimmering darkness of synthesizer oscillations and computerized vocals – enables oneself to find your way once more in this world.

‘Light Is Liquid’ is out on 18th May 2018 via Morr Music ( available to pre-order HERE).

https://www.facebook.com/OrvarSmarason/

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by Birgisdóttir Ingibjörg

Interview with Örvar Smárason.

 

If ever a title reflects the music captured on it, it is this one; this collection of beautiful electronic pop songs feel like shimmering rays of light: an array of particles that navigate the human heart and mind. Can you please take me back to the album’s inception and indeed the writing process of these songs? I wonder did you approach this record in a new light in the sense that it was to be your debut solo record?

Örvar Smárason: The title actually came before the album, I had been walking around with it for a while. I was originally going to use it for something else, but when I started gathering my ideas for this album I instantly felt that it fitted perfectly. I wrote and produced the album in a few intense bursts I guess, but I honestly can’t even remember anymore. I was working on a  lot of different projects at the same time, so I kind of had to keep this one on the sidelines for a bit.

In terms of the album production, these eight sonic creations float magnificently into your consciousness. The songs are at once timeless and almost belong to some future world, not quite yet arrived upon. I’d love to gain an insight into your processes and methodologies as a producer (and creating these contemporary pop spheres must almost be second nature to you at this point)?

OS: Like with the múm tracks, the process here isn’t very controlled or pre-planned. A lot of it depends on letting myself get into the situation where I can let things happen on their own, if that makes any sense. And after that it’s just about putting the work in.

Can you talk me through your studio set-up and the recording sessions themselves for ‘Light Is Liquid’? You have a stellar cast of close musical collaborators from the Iceland music community. Did you envision all these musical guests and voices would make such a vital part to these sound worlds? 

OS: I was actually in the middle of changing studios while I was making this record, but that’s actually fine with me because I think I work better when my set-up isn’t too rigid or nailed down. I use a a lot of smaller electronic instruments, samplers and synths on this record, so a lot of it was made by just playing around with them. And while making the record I didn’t really think about which singers I was going to collaborate with or if I was even going to have vocals on the album at all. And outside of the vocals and drums on one of the tracks, there aren’t really any collaborations on the album. It’s pretty much only electronic stuff I programmed myself. In fact, I think I have never worked on an album with so little collaboration with other musicians.

The magical centerpiece of the record I feel arrives with the formidable duo of ‘The Duality Paradox’ and ‘Flesh & Dreams’. The warped voice captured on ‘The Duality Paradox’ emits such a soulful, heartfelt and cathartic release; almost belonging to some Utopian world. Can you recount your memories of writing this and indeed how you must see a song such as this gradually form – with each carefully sculpted layer – before your eyes?

OS: The computerized vocals on these two tracks (as well as on ‘Photoelectric’), the ones that sound like a vocoder…. weren’t really planned. To begin with I was just trying to devise a way to write vocal melodies and lyrics in my songs without having to sing them in myself. I have a very difficult relationship with my voice and I have a difficulty listening to it too much, so I was just trying to find a way so I wouldn’t have to. But when I started hearing these songs again and again with these haunting computer vocals, I knew I couldn’t ever have these songs come out without them.

The dreamy female vocals of the irresistible pop gem ‘Flesh & Dreams’ is another defining moment. For the guest vocalists, how much of the songs were known to you prior to their arrival on the album? For instance, did you find that the guests brought their own ideas and helped shape the songs or did you have a certain vision for what you wanted to create?

OS: Sillus and JFDR kind of ended up on the album by chance, which is amazing. I had already pretty much finished all the tracks before we added any vocals on them, but they just added a whole new dimension to them. And then Sóley did some of the backing vocals and it’s amazing to have someone you can trust so well for something as delicate as singing. I’m not sure I would have trusted my own voice there without her backing vocals.

Sin Fang mixed the album. Can you describe in what way did the album change as a result of this mixing stage? Also, in terms of the various takes of songs (and studio sessions in general), do you find yourself continually revisiting songs where you end up with large library of tracks and moments to choose from, so to speak? 

OS: Me and Sindri have been friends and worked together for a long time, so it makes things very effortless and easy. And he really helped me through the difficult phases like the vocals. We were working on out Team Dreams project with Sóley at pretty much the same time so there was definitely a feeling of the projects spilling a bit into each other. But in the end there is not that much similar between the two albums. And mixing the album with him was great. Sindri is very methodical and focused on details in his work and hears stuff my mind doesn’t compute. So Light is Liquid would probably just be a bag of unfinished chaos if it wasn’t for him.

The album closer is another very powerful moment of ‘Light Is Liquid’, illustrating the more ambient and textured dimensions. I’d love for you to recount your memories of writing and composing ‘Cthulhu Regio’? Please shed some light on the song-title and lyrical content of the song. As a listener, it feels that hope and survival have been arrived upon at the end of this musical journey. How do you see the album’s gripping journey resolve itself?

OS: Cthulhu Regio is a dark area on the planet Pluto in a shape that looks something like a whale. It was first identified just a few years ago and having been very much into HP Lovecraft and his mythos as a teenager, the name really spoke to me. But since then they have actually changed the name to Cthulhu Macula. The song in itself is about working your way through some dark areas, but in a detached agnostic kind of a way. If that makes any sense.  It was an accumulation of a few different things I was going through.

As a writer and poet (alongside your musical creations), is there a particular technique to your writing that you feel is almost constant (or relatively similar) across your different bodies of written work? 

OS: Maybe. I think a lot of creative ideas come when I think I am completely switched off, either when I’m out running, cooking food or half-asleep. But actually sculpting something out of these ideas requires very conscious work. That might not be a technique, but it’s a way of living.

Lastly, looking back over the cherished discography of Múm, can you share with me some of your most cherished moments or memories that you feel very strongly?

OS: A few days ago I was thinking about the very first trip we went abroad playing as múm in ’97 or ´98 and we were playing in Cambridge of all places. There were only the two of us in the band back then and we didn’t really have a clue what we were doing. And neither did the promoters of the show, because when we came to the venue we saw they had written „drum & bass” under múm on all the flyers for the concert. We spent the next half hour crossing out all the d’s and b’s and thinking we were pretty funny.

‘Light Is Liquid’ is out on 18th May 2018 via Morr Music (available to pre-order HERE).

https://www.facebook.com/OrvarSmarason/

https://www.facebook.com/morrmusicberlin/

Written by admin

May 15, 2018 at 7:01 pm

Guest Mixtape: B. Fleischmann

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B.-Fleischmann_glances

B. Fleischmann, the longest-tenured solo artist on Berlin-based label Morr Music, returns with indie-spirited, electronica-enhanced moments of bliss on his new album “Stop Making Fans”: Recorded with a little help from friends including vocalist Gloria Amesbauer, Markus Schneider (guitars), and Valentin Duit (drums), it’s a two-part reflection on artistic self-reliance vs. fame-seeking conformism, another deeply personal, utterly idiosyncratic album by the Indietronic trailblazer.

The infectious single ‘Here Comes The A Train’ is the perfect opener with its dazzling beats and emotive vocal delivery. On the hypnotic chorus refrain, the Vienna-based producer laments  “a hundred times I’ve been told my rhymes are too old”; the lead single is a deeply poignant indie gem. Warm indie fuzz is wonderfully fused with indie tronic beats on ‘We’ve Heard The Talking Heads Talking’, creating an irresistible indie pop gem with swirls of psychedelia. ‘Stop Making Fans’ represents another fresh and dynamic sound world of innovative beats and intricately woven pop hooks. Lo-fi electronic pop odysseys lie at every turn: the sun drenched pop bliss of ‘There Is A Head’ (with crystalline guitar passages) and the glorious duet with Gloria Amesbauer (who guests on several tracks) on the pristine indietronic sphere ‘It’s Not Enough’. The album closer reveals perhaps the pinnacle of Fleischmann’s latest solo work as the timeless spirit of Neu! is beautifully etched across the sprawling krautrock canvas of ‘Endless Stunner’ (a fitting title indeed).

 

We are delighted to present to you a special guest mix compiled by B. Fleischmann, entitled ‘Glances‘:

 

B. Fleischmann – “Glances” (Fractured Air Guest Mix)

01  William Basinski – “Melancholia I” (Temporary Residence)
02  The Necks – “Blue Mountain” (Idealogic Organ)
03  Neu! – “Hallogallo” (Gronland Records)
04  Delia Gonzales – “Hidden Song” (DFA)
05  Free The Robots – “Wandering Gypsy” (Alpha Pup Records)
06  Schlammpeitziger – “What’s Fruit” (Pingipung)
07  Driftmachine – “Call Mr. Moriba” (Umor-Rex)
08  Kammerflimmer Kollektief – “Jinx” (Staubgold)
09  Restless Leg Syndrome – “Here For Good” (Duzz Down San)
10  Julia Holter – “Silhouette” (Domino)
11  You + Your D. Metal Friend – “Sonnier 6” (Alien Transistor)

‘Stop Making Fans’ is out now on Morr Music.

www.bfleischmann.com

www.morrmusic.com

Step Right Up: Spirit Fest

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Interview with Markus Acher.

It was one of the best personal and musical experiences for me.”

—Markus Acher

Words: Mark Carry

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Warm percussion and soft strum of acoustic guitar opens the irresistible torch-lit folk pop gem ‘Deja Vu’. Welcome to the bewitching world of Spirit Fest: the newly formed supergroup built around acclaimed Japanese duo, Tenniscoats, and featuring members of Notwist, Jam Money and Joasihno. The intricately woven vocals – swapped between Notwist’s Markus Acher and Tenniscoats – reels you in deep, creating a haven of celestial sounds that swirl majestically in the ether.

The pair of Acher-penned tracks ‘Rain Rain’ and ‘River River’ are sublime avant pop gems that form the vital pulse of the debut album’s opening half. A journey unfolds as the immaculate guitar tones simmer beneath Acher’s achingly beautiful lyrics. The hypnotic quality is not unlike a ripple of raindrops falling onto the surface of water: the meditative refrain of “rain on me” rises beneath the ebb and flow of Tenniscoats’ ‘River River’ invites reflection, of the deepest kind as a healing force prevails throughout this gorgeous pop lament. The sumptuous layers of blissful tones offers solace and hope.

Spirit Fest is a vital musical document from some of independent music’s most treasured artists. This divine pop odyssey represents one of their most accomplished works thus far (in terms of Tenniscoats or Notwist studio albums and the many marvelous collaborations all of these musicians have undertaken). A journey to awaken and enlighten.

‘Spirit Fest’ is out now on Morr Music.

https://www.facebook.com/spiritfestmusic/
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markus_acher

Interview with Markus Acher.

Congratulations on the irresistible pop opus of Spirit Fest, a collection of stunningly beautiful pop songs, for the here and now. Please recount your memories of first discovering the music of Tenniscoats and what paths led to the inception of this inspired new collaboration?

Markus Acher: Thank you very much! I’m very happy you like it.

When we visited Tokyo for the first time in 2005 with Lali Puna, I was looking for independent-underground-music from japan apart from the pop- and noise-bands, I knew. A friendly lady at tower-records recommended the CD “Songs for Nao” on chapter-music, a compilation with bands mainly centered around tenniscoats and their label majikick. This CD to this day is one of my favourite albums, as it opened up a whole new world to me. The music is intimate, folky, experimental, strange and familiar at the same time, and incredibly touching… wonderful songwriting and singing.

So, from that point, I tried to find tenniscoats-CDs, where-ever I could, which is difficult in Europe. They became one of my favourite, or maybe my favourite band.
As our friends from the Tokyo-based label afterhours are friends with Saya and Ueno, I had the chance to meet them, and we also talked about a collaboration. When we had the chance to invite bands for our festival Alien Disko in Munich last December, they were the first band, I invited.

It is a joy to witness these songs unfold and the rich musical language that is shared and communicated between its members. There is certainly a fluency and clarity to these avant pop gems. Can you please take me back to the recording sessions of Spirit Fest and your impressions of these particular days, making music together? I can imagine as Alien Disko festival was happening around the same time, this energy and atmosphere channeled into the music in some way?

MA: We recorded all together in the small apartment-studio of our friend Nico. It’s only two rooms, one of them his bedroom, and a small kitchen, with a beautiful view on a playground and the river Isar. It was very narrow and intimate, but that worked very well. It was a great time, between jetlag and sleepwalking, somehow. Also, I was the only person, who knew everybody… it was a gathering of fine people, who didn’t know each other: greek ( Tad klimp), english ( Mat Fowler ), japanese ( Saya + Ueno ) and german ( Cico + me ). We played each other songs, and recorded, without much trying. Mostly everything you hear was recorded live, with some overdubs, and editing afterwards.

In terms of the songs themselves, it’s clear that different members brought songs to the table; where some recordings are tonged with the signature Tenniscoats sound whilst others are more Acher/Notwist oriented creations. I get the impression that the starting point of these songs were perhaps just rough sketches and you must have seen many of these songs undergo a blossom and transformation as the various members put their touches on the recordings? Were there many happy accidents, so to speak that happened during the recording sessions?

MA: The songs were all composed as far as chords and melodies and most of the words go. We played them to each other and everybody found their part. We added new words and parts sometimes. It was so easy, as every one of them has such a clear voice and idea. It was one of the best personal and musical experiences for me personally.

The beating heart of the album (for me) arrives with the sister songs of ‘River River’ and ‘Rain Rain’, both achingly beautiful and meditative laments from the pores of the heart. I’d love for you to discuss the construction of these songs and I wonder were these songs written around the time of the album sessions or were they in your conscience for quite some time? The heavenly harmonies and intricate layers of sonic detail beneath the poetic prose flows like a majestic river, and those clean, warm guitar tones melt into the mix.

MA: These ( and ‘to the moon’ ) were two songs, I wrote with the tenniscoats and the possible collaboration in mind. As their lyrics so beautifully take pictures from nature to tell stories, I wrote about rain and rivers. Also, these songs were composed in not so good times for me, so they are just plain sad, to be honest… that wasn’t a time to be clever…they are just what they are. But what everybody added to the songs, was incredible… and Saya added these new vocal-melodies and arrangement, which made them whole new songs.

I fondly recall the Notwist ‘On/Off’ documentary (circa the making of the classic ‘Neon Golden’ LP) and I was struck by how you were writing some of these songs while in the studio. I wonder would this be the case for many of your sonic ventures, Markus? Spontaneity must be a key factor for you (and this may serve a constant factor in Spirit Fest and your other compelling musical projects)?

MA: As far as singing goes, sometimes, the pressure of having to compose or write something very fast can have very good results, as you write more subconsciously. But actually, I’m not good in it, and try to avoid it 😉 That’s different with playing instruments. I can find parts more easily.

Spirit_Fest_Press_Pic--2

As you and Tenniscoats have such a wealth of music made thus far, these must also provide good reference points for you when it came to beginning Spirit Fest? I wonder what aims and concerns did you have (and conversations did you share) from the outset prior to making the album? I also get the impression that this project was always going to happen, it was just a matter of time. For instance, the art of collaboration is something integral to you and Tenniscoats (and continues to be) so it must have been such a natural and fun process to undertake Spirit Fest. Can you shed some light on the band name too, it’s a perfect title!

MA: Saya and Ueno made many wonderful collaboration-albums. Their collaborations with tape , and also the wonderful “two sunsets” with the Pastels, another favourite band. So when they suggested to make a collaboration, I couldn’t be happier. I thought, it would be important to capture the intimacy and intensity of them playing their songs, and that’s why I asked our good friend Tad klimp to record and produce it. I know, that he understands, what we do, and can capture every little detail. Mat and Cico, I asked, because they are very good friends, too, and very individual musicians, who have an experimental approach to making music, but also like songs and pop-music. In the end, that was a very good combination of people.

‘Spirit Fest’ was Saya’s english title for the song ‘Hitori Matsuri’, a song about a spirit / ghost wandering around at night. When she suggested it to be the band-name, we all liked it very much.

‘Take Me Home’ is such a gorgeous and bewitching pop lament. Again, the rich instrumentation and the vocal harmonies shared by you and Tenniscoats is one of the infinite sparks of the record. When it comes to the stages of beginning and ultimately completing a song, are there perhaps similar happenings or moments that occur during this process? For ‘Take Me Home’, how the song builds and the myriad of immaculate sounds (child-like sounds, piano notes, percussion, bass) and the celestial harmonies continually build, producing such a heartfelt and contemporary pop song. What is a perfect pop song for you (ingredients and so on)?

MA: ‘Take me home’ is an older song by the tenniscoats from their CD “We are everyone”, that I already had covered once. We thought, it could be good to play together. It’s mainly recorded, as we played it, with only a few small overdubs.

Everything is a good song, that you find yourself in and get lost…that tells a story, even when it’s an instrumental. Saya and Ueno have written so many incredible songs over the years. Even, when they are sung in Japanese, I understand them, although I don’t understand the words.

The second edition of the wonderful Alien Disko festival in Munich takes place this December. Can you discuss the lineup for this edition (such an inspired choice of incredible artists) and your vision for this special festival?

MA: The vision is to bring bands to Munich, that normally don’t come here. Many bands skip Munich on their international tours, that’s sad…although there is a really great scene of artists and bands here. We try to invite bands, that do something special, ignore genres or borders, and are somehow uncategorizable. This year, we invited the Congolese family-band Konono N.1, Shabazz Palaces, Amiina from Iceland, Colleen from France, Michaela Melian from Munich, Sam Amidon, Sauna Youth from London, MS John Soda with my brother Micha, Vanishing Twin, and many more.
Spirit Fest will also play again… a sort of release-show and return to the beginning of the record 😉

Lastly, what records do you feel were defining albums for you, Markus? In terms of pre-Notwist, growing up and the vital sounds that led you on the music path in the very beginning?

MA: Oh, there are so many actually… after many Hardcore-records, like Rites of Spring, Jerry’s Kids, Bad Brains, etc… Talk Talk “Laughing stock” was very important, This Heat, too. I took a lot of the guitar-playing from the Wipers, and Dinosaur Jr was a revelation for us, when “You’re living alover me” was released. Pitchfork, the Clean, Sonic Youth, My Bloody Valentine, Yo la Tengo, Stereolab…they were and are very influential.
In recent years, I would say the Pastels, Broadcast and the tenniscoats are bands, I return to very often. Friends.

 

‘Spirit Fest’ is out now on Morr Music.

https://www.facebook.com/spiritfestmusic/
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Written by admin

December 12, 2017 at 2:58 pm

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S1E3 | March mix

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fracturedairmix_march16

Welcome to part three of our monthly mix series. Presented in this month’s mix is the first in our new series of exclusive tracks which will be submitted by guest musicians each month. For March, we include “In the fields”, an exclusive unreleased track by independent music stalwart Benoît Pioulard (Seattle-based musician Thomas Meluch). Since the release of his debut opus “Précis” (via world-renowned Chicago-based Kranky in 2006), Meluch has amassed an incredible body of work, comprising both solo and collaborative recordings. Most recently, Meluch released the debut self-titled album under his Perils guise – Meluch’s collaboration with Canadian composer Kyle Bobby Dunn – as well as “Sonnet”, his most recent solo full-length and the solo E.P. “Noyaux”. Meluch has released music on some of independent music’s finest and most esteemed labels including: Kranky, Morr Music, Desire Path Recordings and Type.

Opening this month’s mix is the fascinating Walt Whitman-inspired collaborative E.P. “Leaves Of Grass” – thanks to Berlin-based Morr Music – where Iggy Pop reads excerpts taken from Whitman’s legendary poetry collection of the same name, while German musicians Carsten Nicolai (Alva Noto) together with Ronald Lippok and Bernd Jestram (Tarwater) provide the intriguing musical accompaniment. Elsewhere, we have selections from: Munich-based producer Skee Mask’s “Junt” E.P.; Canadian violinist and composer Sarah Neufeld’s glorious new solo album “The Ridge”; peerless U.K. producer Chris Clark; A Pleasure’s essential debut L.P. “Minor Youth” for Other People; Kevin Morby (ex bassist to Woods)’s masterful symphonic Dead Oceans full-length “Singing Saw” and Irish/U.S. super-group The Gloaming make their triumphant return with “2” (via Real World Records). Meanwhile, even Dale Cooper, resident FBI Special Agent to Twin Peaks, makes a guest cameo somewhere before the dust settles.

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S1E3 | March mix

To Read/listen on La Blogothèque:

http://en.blogotheque.net/2016/03/24/fractured-air-x-blogotheque-s01e03-march-mix/

 

Tracklisting:

01. Iggy Pop / Tarwater / Alva Noto“As Adam Early In The Morning / I Am He That Aches With Love” (Morr Music)
02. Anna Homler & Steve Moshier“Yesh’ Te” (RVNG Intl)
03. Julien Neto“Questionable Things” (excerpt) (Type)
04. Benoît Pioulard“In The Fields” (Unreleased)
05. Perils“The Unbecoming” (Desire Path Recordings)
06. The Gentleman Losers“Silver Mountain” (Büro)
07. Vashti Bunyan“Here Before” (FatCat)
08. Max Richter“Path 5” (Clark Remix) (Deutsche Grammophon)
09. Clark“Hide on the Treads 3” (The Last Panthers OST, Warp)
10. Mikael Seifu“The Protectors” (RVNG Intl)
11. A Pleasure“Arthur Russel” (Other People)
12. Skee Mask“Junt” (Ilian Tape)
13. Prins Thomas“E” (Smalltown Supersound)
14. Odd Nosdam“Sisters” (Boards of Canada Remix) (Leaving)
15. Arthur Russell“Habit Of You” (Audika, Rough Trade)
16. Woo“A Complex Art” (Drag City)
17. Kevin Morby“I Have Been to the Mountain” (Dead Oceans)
18. Bullion“Dip Your Foot” (DEEK Recordings)
19. Rayon“Il Collo e la Collana 02” (Alien Transistor)
20. Mary Lattimore“The Quiet at Night” (Ghostly International)
21. The Gloaming“Fáinleog (Wanderer)” (Real World)
22. Sarah Neufeld“Where the Light Comes In” (Paper Bag)

Compiled by Fractured Air, March 2016. The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.

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