FRACTURED AIR

The universe is making music all the time

Posts Tagged ‘Mary Lattimore

Chosen One: Mary Lattimore & Jeff Zeigler

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Interview with Mary Lattimore & Jeff Zeigler.

“Somehow I wanted for us to make something that represented flight, maybe some kind of enlightenment, getting lighter.”

—Mary Lattimore

Mary Lattimore and Jeff Zeigler Press Photos 2014

Earlier this autumn marked the highly-anticipated release of the special collaborative work between Philadephia-based harpist Mary Lattimore and multi-instrumentalist Jeff Zeigler on the prestigious Thrill Jockey label. The debut album, ‘Slant of Light’ is a mesmerising collection of four stunning improvisations, built on the immaculate instrumentation of synthesizer, guitar and harp that seamlessly taps into a divine state of transcendence. An other-worldly feel permeates the rich tapestry of ‘Slant of Light’s sonic canvas as a deep telepathic connection is forged between the gifted duo.

In many ways, the pair’s collaborative work began with 2013’s ‘The Withdrawing Room’ – Lattimore’s debut solo record- which Zeigler recorded and mixed, as well as adding synthesizer parts to the epic ‘You’ll Be Fiiinnne’. ‘Slant of Light’ represents the latest chapter in the pair’s musical journey that continues to explore new sonic terrain; delving wonderfully into realms of folk, ambient and drone soundscapes.

The opening ‘Welsh Corgis In The Snow’ is a slow, meditative lament that contains gorgeous harp arpeggios and gentle pulses of synths, resulting in a haven of celestial sounds. A drone infused ambient opus unfolds with each sacred note. ‘The White Balloon’ immediately transports me back to cult singer-songwriter Ed Askew’s ‘For The World’ album (a record Lattimore collaborated on) as a timeless folk gem ascends into the atmosphere. The voice of Askew feels just a heartbeat away. The synthesizer parts become more pronounced on the record’s part B, particularly on ‘Echo Sounder’. The closing ‘Tomorrow Is A Million’ explores deeper into sonic experimentation as an eerie feel exudes from the scintillating soundscapes.

Both artist’s highly collaborative pasts forms a trajectory to many of the indispensable records of the U.S independent music scene. Lattimore has recorded with Kurt Vile, Meg Baird, Steve Gunn, Ed Askew, Sharon Van Etten, to name but a few after years of touring with Thurston Moore. Zeigler has played with members of Chris Forsyth’s Solar Motel Band, The War On Drugs and A Sunny Day In Glasgow in his group Arc In Round. In addition, Zeigler is the much-sought-after recording engineer in the heart of the Philadelphia music scene, recording for artists such as Kurt Vile, The War On Drugs, Nothing and Purling Hiss.

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Interview with Mary Lattimore & Jeff Zeigler.

Congratulations on the wonderful collaborative project. ‘Slant of Light’ is a really special record that that transports you to a magical realm of treasured sounds. On your own solo record “The Withdrawing Room”, Jeff is also present on the recording sessions so it feels very natural (and fitting) that this duo has been officially formed. Firstly, please discuss the collaborative process between you both and how you have developed such a deep understanding of each other’s music? Has the process changed in any way between ‘The Withdrawing Room’ and ‘Slant of Light’?

Mary Lattimore: Jeff recorded ‘The Withdrawing Room’ and played synth on the first piece and we’ve been playing together since then, realizing that we really like improvising together. With ‘The Withdrawing Room’, I was playing, he was in the control room playing, with the door between us closed. I asked him to add a few things, just experimenting to hear how different sounds could enhance the harp record. He played synth, but it didn’t feel like a collaboration like this one is. ‘Slant of Light’ was recorded after lots of shows and some travelling together, so it feels more conversational and informed. It’s still an experiment, but we’re more comfortable with each other and know how to react to where the melody is being taken. This time we were in the same room!

Jeff Zeigler: The first time I worked with Mary was on the day that we began recording ‘The Withdrawing Room’. The vibe was really low key and she asked me if I’d like to play on one of the pieces and I just tried to add an extra level of atmosphere and reinforce what she was already doing without stepping on it — it was a really effortless first collaboration, so I think we both felt that it made a lot of sense to continue in that fashion. The process changed really significantly after we wrote our score for ‘Le Revelateur’ — up until that point I had focusing more on texture and atmosphere than melodies, which was one angle, and definitely made everything a bit more droney and hypnotic, but when it came time to write instead of free improvise, it seemed to make far more sense to focus on creating memorable haunting melodies that glued together the harp and textural elements. So yes, the process has changed significantly on my end.

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In terms of the compositions, how much of the new music is borne from improvisation? On ‘Slant of Light’ to me, there seems to be an equal balance between experimentation and meticulous song-craft (representing the closing half and opening half, respectively!)

ML: You know, none of this one was really composed either. We just sat down, I thought of a little opening part, Jeff figured out the key, we were just going for it. The pieces are all first or second takes. They do feel a little more song-y, but it’s all just ideas that we were just feeling out in the moment, trapped in Jeff’s studio during this huge snowstorm for two days. I think the time of year really affected how the ideas were coming to us in those few days, with no light distractions of a lovely summer, just sloshing through the relentless, endless winter of 2014.

JZ: The album is essentially all improvised aside from ‘The White Balloon’. Mary or I would start playing something, the other person would join in, and then we’d jam it out for an unspecified amount of time.  Afterwards, we’d usually discuss it for a minute, maybe figure out a few different things to try or talk about the structure and then try a second take. I don’t think any of the pieces on the album, aside from ‘The White Balloon’, made it past a third take before we were satisfied with the results.

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I feel part B is more improvised-based but certainly the first two tracks seem to have been mapped out before the sessions took place. The opening ‘Welsh Corgis In The Snow’ is such a beautiful title and I love how the gentle arpeggio of harp notes blend effortlessly with the synth pulses. I would love for you to talk me through this particular harp-based composition, Mary? What are your memories of writing this piece of music? 

ML: I wish I could say that I put lots of brain-effort into the composition, but really, I think all of the songs came directly from our human hearts! Haha. I thought of the beginning part and then where it would go, with those low notes in a chorus, and then just started slowing everything down and Jeff did too. It was an intense few days – I packed a bag and spent the night in the studio where Jeff lives, as more heavy snow was expected. The next morning, we’d found out that a friend had passed away and I feel like all of the elements were there to translate some feelings, making something that marks a point in time for both of us. Jeff will be happy to hear that you like the title! He made it up! Jeff and his cute dog Baxter like winter and I’m glad he gave it a cheerier title than something goth-y I would’ve given it. I’m from the south and I go real darkside when it’s cold!

JZ: The track starts with my Korg Mono/Poly slowly fading in and droning. My whole setup is going through a Roland Space Echo tape delay, and I’m making slight adjustments to the rate of the delay by hand, which creates a woozy, seasick feel by minutely altering the pitch of the synth drone. Mary starts playing on top of that, and in another minute or so I add an octave up pitch shift, which opens up the sound, and then I start looping and layering the synth and Mary begins adding in tweaked-out harp delays. I honestly don’t remember what’s going on with acoustic strumming noises that you can hear in the room. I think I may have been playing a psaltery and just strumming it open somewhat randomly? The track becomes a bit more static around the 4 minute mark and both Mary and I are tweaking our pedals. At 4:15 or so introduce a melody on processed melodica that I continue playing and looping for the next few minutes. Elements then gradually strip away until you’re left with the initial drone and the new melodica melody, and the track fades out on the Mono/Poly drone.

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Mary Lattimore and Jeff Zeigler Press Photos 2014

Mary, you have been involved in an endless array of utterly compelling collaborations, having recorded and performed with Kurt Vile, Meg Baird, Ed Askew, Steve Gunn and Thurston Moore to name but a few. These projects must be so rewarding and fulfilling to be part of. How do these collaborations feed its way into your own music and music-making process? Are there certain parallels you see that exist between these collaborations? Can you shed some light please on what collaborative works will next see the light of day?

ML: I love both collaborating and contributing to other people’s songs, writing parts. It’s fun to see how people you admire work, to see behind the curtain, to be a part of the process. For me, it doubles the magic of it, when you get to see the human trial-and-error, the scrapping something, and the million takes, and the finally getting it. I love the sitting around listening to what somebody else is doing, listening back to your overdubbed part, and trying it again but up an octave, listening back, over and over. On my own record and for this duo one, it’s a totally different process, where it’s all exorcism and improvisation, but I also love the perfectionism of working on someone’s thought-about song, and witnessing the deliberate series of choices that are being made. All the little choices, capturing a vibe and sharpening a song. Working on the new Steve Gunn record was a total feelgood delight, up at Black Dirt in upstate New York. The musicians were next level, a solid group of talented people. I just had the pleasure of making a harp and koto record with this friend Maxwell August Croy. It’ll be out next year. That one was improvised.

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Jeff, as a recording engineer you have recorded albums for musical luminaries such as The War On Drugs, Kurt Vile, Nothing and Purling Hiss. I would love to gain an insight into this aspect of your work. Are there certain rules or beliefs you abide by and stick by when recording? Also, I would love to know how early in life did your fascination with sound begin? Can you pin-point the moment you realized music would be the path for you to follow?

JZ: There are certain sounds and techniques that I gravitate towards, and people tend to come to me for that aesthetic, but to not break your own rules every once in awhile would be pretty limiting and counter-productive. I guess what generally appeals to me is what’s fairly evident on ‘Slant of Light’— a combination of the organic and the inorganic helping to create a unique and somewhat unidentifiable space. I’m a huge fan of luring people in with a familiar sound and then “enhancing” it in such a way that either accentuates its’ beauty or warps it in such a way that creates a sense of unease. Or maybe takes you to a place that’s less literal place then the elements suggest on their own.

I think the point at which I realized that there was no turning back was when I began playing guitar again in college and would borrow the school’s 4-track cassette recorder and just experiment with different recording techniques and unintentionally started incorporating a lot of “concrete” techniques into my songwriting, making the two somewhat permanently intertwined in my mind.

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‘The White Balloon’ is yet another stunning tour-de-force. The music evokes moods and colours in much the same way a beautiful landscape painting would create. I imagine the voice of Ed Askew will appear at any moment during the meditative harp passages- returning nicely to a previous collaboration of yours with  ‘For The World’. What are your memories of writing this particular piece of music?

ML: This song was created with my friend in mind, the one who’d passed away. I’d just seen these photos:

http://www.theparisreview.org/art-photography/5839/airship-lena-herzog-graham-dorrington

A photograph from photographer Lena Herzog and aeronaut Graham Dorrington’s sketchbook ‘Airship.’ The series details Dorrington’s dream of “pure, silent, slow flight over the jungle treetops,” which was documented in Werner Herzog’s film The White Diamond. (Paris Review)

Somehow I wanted for us to make something that represented flight, maybe some kind of enlightenment, getting lighter. I love Jeff’s playing on it. My Granny had also just died, too, so I think the piece was kind of influenced by recent ghosts of beautiful people. There’s a really nice music video for it, created the wonderful Naomi Yang (www.naomivision.com) and it was shot in my hometown, Asheville NC, at my Granny’s cabin.

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The cover painting is by Philadelphia-based artist Becky Suss, whose stunningly beautiful work also graces the sleeve of ‘The Withdrawing Room’. Please talk me through the concept of this artwork and indeed your fascination with her work? It’s so very distinctive and unique, I’m very glad to have come across her work through your music. 

ML: Becky is so talented!! She is amazing. Her work on both covers has gotten so many compliments and I feel really fortunate that she’s been so generous. I think the worlds match well, hers and mine/mine and Jeff’s. They just make sense together. A lot of her paintings are of rooms of her grandparents’ house. The style reminds me so much of a beautiful Frank Lloyd Wright house or something. Nature, collections and treasures, clean shiny big windows, weird sculptures, thoughtful and layered memories of an empty house – I feel like I can smell what the house smells like just looking at them. It was, sadly, demolished and she’s painted from her memory of it. Her website is www.beckysuss.net. The best.

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Please discuss the current music scene in Philadelphia, Mary? What a time it is right now with the likes of The War On Drugs – as ever – going from strength to strength.

ML: My friend Kathryn just put on the greatest event of the summer, the second Kensington Picnic. All of the buddies from the neighborhood came out and lots of good genius friends played –  Laura Baird, Fursaxa, Randall of Nazareth, Spacin, Hohlraum, Strapping Fieldhands, the amazing Birds of Maya, and Jeff and I played too. We have a great community in Philly. Our great pals Purling Hiss have a record coming out on the same day as ours. Yeah, War on Drugs are killing, Kurt Vile and those guys are gonna be working on a new one, Chris Forsyth and his Solar Motel band are always awesome, Jeff is working on a great solo record, Watery Love are gonna be playing the night before my birthday, so that’ll be a treat. Feel lucky to know a ton of sincerely creative, driven people and it all feels really supportive.

JZ: Philadelphia’s music scene is pretty insane right now! There are so many great bands and artists working on so many different fronts and it makes me really happy. There’s generally a ton of support and positivity and a bunch of different scenes that exist outside of each other but still tend to cross-pollinate to some extent. There are some exciting newer bands — Amanda X, White Lighters and Myrrias spring to mind, and also a bunch of lifers like Chris Forsyth, Purling Hiss, Kurt Vile, the War on Drugs guys, etc that are just doing what they do and have been for ages because it’s their thing. I think the fact that Philly is still relatively cheap and very central just draws a lot of people to it who have a common purpose. It’s getting increasingly gentrified, which worries me, but I think we’re safe from getting as soulless as New York has for at least a few decades.

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Jeff, your band Arc In Round creates such a mesmerising wall of sound. Please discuss the inception of this band and plans for an upcoming release?

JZ: Thank you! We are unfortunately on a semi-permanent hiatus. I’m currently recording an amazing LP for Myrrias, the new band of Mikele Edwards, who was the other creative half of Arc in Round, and I’m in the process of finishing up a solo LP that’s sort of in line with the AiR material, but aside from the occasional show and possibly a loose album of extended improvised music I don’t foresee us doing much. I should have this new as-yet-unnamed project up and running in the Spring and am also currently working on a beat and sound design-heavy record that will probably include some pretty great Philly rappers on it too.

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Last December, the both of you performed a live score for Philippe Garrel’s 1968 film ‘Le Revelateur’ in Marfa, TX. Can you please recount your memories of this particular night? What is the process and experience like when performing a live score to a film? Do you have plans to do this again in the near future? I hope you and Jeff tour this new record of yours, before too long.

ML: Yeah, we definitely have plans to tour! We played the score with the film in Philly and Chicago in September. We’ve been on tour with Steve Gunn for the first two weeks of October, which has been real cool, but not with the film.

We were asked to compose and perform a score for a silent film for Marfa’s annual event that happens around New Year’s Eve. Jeff and I got together and wrote some themes that corresponded with images and scenes, with bits of improvisation connecting the themes. The film is very beautiful and strange, intentionally silent, but we were able to get Garrel’s blessing. I’d never been to Marfa before (Jeff had been there with his band Arc in Round) and so it was such a treat to check out that little town in a new part of the country.

Saw my first shooting stars out there!! It worked out really well, I think, and we’re looking forward to diving into the film again and getting reacquainted with the music we wrote.

JZ: It was amazing! Nicki Itner and everyone else from Ballroom Marfa are great people and were such a pleasure to work with. It was all a bit of a whirlwind, as it was only the second time we had played along to the film on a large screen instead of a laptop, so it was harder, for me at least, to recognize cues, which was slightly nerve-wracking but once we started everything fell into place pretty naturally. Process-wise, things worked in a manner that’s fairly similar to how we wrote the album: one of us would come up with a part for a scene and the other person would try to enhance it, we would go through the scene, discuss what worked and what else we might be able to do, and then go from there. Since it’s all semi-improvised there’s a bit of wiggle room…..but not much.

 


 

 

Mary Lattimore   Jeff Zeigler - Slant of Light Cover - 374

 

‘Slant Of Light’ is available now on Thrill Jockey Records.

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https://www.facebook.com/lattimorezeiglerduo
http://www.thrilljockey.com

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Fractured Air 25: Tinted Glass (A Mixtape by Jeff Zeigler)

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Philadelphia-based artist Jeff Zeigler releases ‘Slant of Light’, the much-anticipated debut full-length LP with harpist Mary Lattimore, this month via Chicago-based Thrill Jockey Records. Zeigler is a multi-instrumentalist and hugely renowned recording artist (Kurt Vile, The War on Drugs, Purling Hiss) whose reputation has been firmly established long ago in the thriving Philadelphia independent music scene. ‘Slant of Light’ comprises both beautifully organic and texturally dense improvisations recorded with Lattimore on harp and Zeigler on synthesizers and guitar. The combination of both artistic vision and genuine ambition, together with remarkable imagination and technical execution, is testament not only to each individual’s mastery of their own respective instrument but also to their near-symbiotic connection as a recording duo. To date, Lattimore has collaborated extensively with a vast array of artists including Sharon Van Etten, Thurston Moore, Steve Gunn and Wrekmeister Harmonies; while Zeigler has performed with members of Chris Forsyth’s Solar Motel Band, The War on Drugs, and A Sunny Day in Glasgow in his group Arc in Round. ‘Slant of Light’ by Mary Lattimore and Jeff Zeigler is available now worldwide via Thrill Jockey.

mix_sleeve_jeffzeigler

Fractured Air 25: Tinted Glass (A Mixtape by Jeff Zeigler)

To listen on Mixcloud:

http://www.mixcloud.com/Fractured_Air/fractured-air-25-tinted-glass-a-mixtape-by-jeff-zeigler/

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Tracklisting:

01. Cabaret Voltaire ‘Nag Nag Nag’ [NovaMute / Rough Trade]
02. Camberwell Now ‘Working Nights’ [Ink]
03. Family Fodder ‘Savoir Faire’ [Fresh]
04. Cold Beat ‘Tinted Glass’ [Crime On The Moon]
05. Clan of Xymox ‘No Words’ [4AD]
06. Nico ‘Sixty Forty’ [Aura / Metronome]
07. John Bender ‘31A4’ [Record Sluts]
08. Howard Shore ‘Assassins in the Barn’ [Not On Label]
09. Kraftwerk ‘Ruckzuck’ [Philips]
10. Electrelane ‘I’m on Fire’ [Too Pure]
11. The Smiths ‘You’ve Got Everything Now’ [Rough Trade]
12. Samsimar ‘Indang Pariaman’ [Sublime Frequencies]
13. Third Eye Foundation ‘Sound of Violence’ [Domino / Merge]
14. Crescent ‘Every Atom of our Blood’ [Roomtone / Swarffinger]
15. Butthole Surfers ‘Graveyard’ [Touch And Go / Blast First]
16. Movietone ‘In Mexico’ [Domino / Drag City]
17. Julee Cruise ‘I Remember’ [Warner Bros.]
18. Harold Budd and the Cocteau Twins ‘She Will Destroy You’ [4AD]
19. Disco Inferno ‘Footprints in the Snow’ [Rough Trade / Bar/None]

 


 

slantoflight_web

‘Slant of Light’  is available now on all formats via Thrill Jockey.

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https://www.facebook.com/lattimorezeiglerduo
http://www.thrilljockey.com

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Written by admin

September 23, 2014 at 10:39 am

Mixtape: ‘Do Not Wait For Better Times’ [A Fractured Air Mix]

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donotwaitforbettertimes

‘Do Not Wait For Better Times’ [A Fractured Air Mix]

To listen on Mixcloud:

http://www.mixcloud.com/Fractured_Air/do-not-wait-for-better-times-a-fractured-air-mix/

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Tracklisting:

01. The Peep Show ‘Do Not Wait For Better Times’ [Tenth Planet]
02. The Moles ‘Lonely Hearts Get What They Deserve’ [Fire]
03. Craig Leon ‘Nommo’ [RVNG Intl]
04. K. Leimer ‘Lonely Boy’ [RVNG Intl]
05. Sharon Van Etten ‘Break Me’ [Jagjaguwar]
06. Emerald Web ‘Dreamspun’ [Stargate]
07. Mary Lattimore & Jeff Zeigler ‘The White Balloon’ [Thrill Jockey]
08. Amen Dunes ‘Lilac In Hand’ [Sacred Bones]
09. The Necks ‘The Boys III’ [‘The Boys’ OST / Fish Of Milk]
10. Erik K Skodvin ‘Shining, Burning’ [Sonic Pieces]
11. Hildur Guðnadóttir ‘Heyr Himnasmiður’ [Touch]
12. Ela Stiles ‘Anything’ [Fire / Bedroom Suck]
13. Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh ‘what what what’ [Diatribe]
14. Margaret Barry ‘She Moved Through the Fair’ (Long Version) [Rounder]
15. Robbie Basho ‘Leaf in the Wind’ [Gnome Life]

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The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or their respective record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.

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Fractured Air. The universe is making music all the time.

Mixcloud / Facebook / Twitter

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Time Has Told Me: Ed Askew

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Interview with Ed Askew.

“He sang in the morning
And after work he’d sing
A song before supper
For the world”

—‘For The World’, Ed Askew

Words: Mark Carry, Paintings: Ed Askew

ed askew_small objects series

During the Autumn of last year (albeit several decades late), I discovered the enchanting music of U.S. singer-songwriter Ed Askew, in the form of a mix-tape compiled by Philadelphia-based harpist, Mary Lattimore (who also plays on Askew’s current album, ‘For The World’). The mix was entitled Keeper of Beauty (three words which conveys the sheer beauty and purity of the artist’s empowering works of divine art), and Ed Askew’s ‘Blue Eyed Baby’ appeared towards the gentle close (sandwiched between Nils Frahm’s ‘Went Missing’ and Samara Lubelski’s ‘Keeper of Beauty’). A ripple-flow of piano notes and rich tapestry of harp notes forms the ideal backdrop to the songwriter’s delicate voice. In the words of Lattimore: “Ed is a legend and his songs make people weep, they move people. I played harp on this one. Very proud of this record.”

Ed Askew is a painter and songwriter living in New York, whose reputation has solidly grown to become a New York music legend. This reputation is not undeserved, the singer songwriter released ‘Ask The Unicorn’ on ESP (also home to Pearls Before Swine, Sun Ra, Albert Ayler) in 1968 to critical acclaim and cult status (in much the same way as Mark Fry’s ‘Dreaming With Alice’, Vashti Bunyan’s ‘Just Another Diamond Day’ and ‘Parallelograms’ by Linda Perhacs forged a rare odyssey of psych folk treasures from this golden age circa late 60’s/early 70’s period). In recent years, each of these artists have thankfully received their much-deserved recognition and universal acclaim as a new generation of music fans are introduced to these utterly transcendent musical works. Last year, the British-based independent label, Tin Angel Records, released Ed Askew’s deeply affecting full-length album, ‘For The World’, an album steeped in stunning beauty and honesty. What is most striking about ‘For The World’ (after endless revisits throughout the changing seasons) is how hugely enriching the narrative of Askew’s collection of songs are that, in turn, serves the vital pulse to the rich sonic canvas. A wonderful use of colour and evocative imagery — songs created from the mind of a painter — includes recurring imagery of a child’s eyes, nature, willow and maple trees, the ocean, and sense of belonging and home-place, typified by the use of the rose as almost a symbol of the album, referenced by the famous quote of Gertrude Stein’s (the tiple-based lament ‘Gertrude Stein’ feels like a song you’ve always known, particularly the chorus refrain of majestic harmonies). Moments of joy, solace, sadness, nostalgia, loneliness, and despair are etched across the vivid colours of ‘For The World’s mesmerising web of sound.

In the summer of 2011, Ed Askew embarked on his first U.S tour at the age of 71, in support of the limited vinyl/digital re-release of the 80’s era cassette tape ‘Imperfection’, accompanied on piano by Jay Pluck and travelled with tour mates, The Black Swans. A short time later (two weeks in fact), as a result of the tour, it was decided that Jerry DeCicca (of The Black Swans) would assist Ed in making a record, which would later become ‘For The World’. The group spent a week in a West Harlem warehouse that September. The recording sessions comprised the gifted talents of Jay Pluck, two members of The Black Swans’ Tyler Evans (banjo, tiple, electric guitar), Canaan Faulkner (bass) and Eve Searls (backing vocals), along with Mary Lattimore (Meg Baird, Thurston Moore) on harp. Later on, electric guitar was added by Marc Ribot (Tom Waits, Elvis Costello) and backing vocals on three songs were provided by Sharon Van Etten.

The raw emotion and tearful sadness of ‘Moon In The Mind’ immediately stops you in your tracks. A song so powerful, touching and intensely sad. The lyrics are sheer poetry, which drift slowly beneath the windswept beauty of harmonica, piano, and guitar: “Golden boats float down a river of sighs / Rain on the street is falling tears my eyes.” A lyric in the following verse resonates powerfully, the light of hope and darkness of pain and fear are effortlessly coalesced together as Askew achingly sings “Wings of an angel open in the dark sky.” The musical interlude of harmonica arrives later that is filled in a prevailing sense of despair and searching, matching the mood of Miles Davis’ ‘Kind Of Blue’ or ‘On The Beach’ era Neil Young. The album closer (and title-track) is a torch-lit ballad to cast light upon the darkest of days. As the chorus refrain of rejoice brings the album to a fitting close, the horizon comes into view, where the bluebirds are singing, that marks the end of a wholly enlightening experience. Like the album’s cover painting (a self portrait by Ed Askew), ‘For The World’ is a work of true art: rare and true.

“We chase the birds away and they flee
To evergreens down the street
We make castles in the leaves
Of maple trees”

(lyrics taken from ‘Maple Street’)

 

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‘For The World’ is available now on Tin Angel Records.

http://edaskew.bandcamp.com/
http://eaband.tumblr.com/
http://www.tinangelrecords.co.uk/edaskew/

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ed_selfportrait_Dots 1970s-1990

Interview with Ed Askew.

You have spent a lot of your life living and performing around New York. I love how the city is almost a character inside the world of your songs that forms the foundation to your songs, particularly the beautiful ‘Gertrude Stein’. Can you please describe New York for me, in your eyes and how much of an inspiration the city has served your music and song?

Ed Askew: This is Empire City: http://edaskew.bandcamp.com/track/empire-city
Yes, the City is bigger than any of us. A joy and a tragedy. I’ve gone everywhere in NYC since I moved here. Though I’ve lived at one location, I have worked with kids (doing art) in Harlem, Washington Heights, and the upper west side. I have painted apartments across from the Met Museum and downtown. I have played shows in Brooklyn and Manhattan. And I have baby sat for friends in Queens.

Of course, I have used the City as a setting for more than one song. They say that L.A. has no center. But NYC doesn’t have a center either. And, even if I do stay and work here in my room most days, I always feel the city around me: the rivers, the bridges, the politics, the various communities.

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I would love for you to discuss for me please the title of the record, ‘For The World’. I feel those three words serve the perfect embodiment of the album’s ten songs. The beautiful self-portrait painting that adorns the sleeve in a way, reminds me of Dylan’s ‘Self Portrait’ or at least it comes to mind when I take the record out of its sleeve. Was this a painting that was completed at the same time of making the album?

EA: “For the World” is the title the producer preferred. Though I like it. It is the tittle of the song by that name. And I agree that it expresses my desire to share my music; or really our music, since I am not the only one on the album.

The self portrait is an interesting story. Originally, Tin Angel was interested in some of the self portraits I did a while ago, that I have on Flickr. Then there was discussion about using some more recent charcoal self portraits. But these are tall and narrow. So I made a charcoal drawing in a square format, that I thought might fit the album better. Then someone said we should have something in color. So I added color to the portrait, and sent it to Tin angel. I said, “maybe you can use this for something”. And everybody liked it.

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One of my favourite songs off the new album is ‘Maple Street’. I love how the piano melody flows along your stream of poetic words, and the fragile guitar accompaniment works amazingly. The vivid imagery of the maple tree and maple leaves are scattered throughout the album. I would love for you to please discuss ‘Maple Street’, the street itself (if it is a street you walk down often or originated from your imagination) and the importance of nature in your songs. I love the sensual aspect to your songs, and ‘Maple Street’ is one such example. The lyric “we will build what we believe” is one of my favourite lyrics contained in ‘For The World’.

EA: Yes, that’s Mark Ribot playing lead guitar.
Maple Street is a Street near where I grew up. It’s where my church was at that time. The story is made up. Though I did try to build a kind of low, not to high up, “tree house”. It fell on my head. I wasn’t hurt.
I just liked the idea of a bunch of kids making something like that. Cooperating on such a project. Doing something, without being organized, and protected by adults.

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Can you please take me back to your first ever European tour which you embarked on last year, Ed. This must have been a very special moment for you. Can you recount your memories of these shows? I’m sure there is a vivid sense of recognition and anticipation for the concerts that have certainly been a long time coming. What were your thoughts on Europe and how was the experience for you, both personally and artistically?

EA: Well, we had a nice time mostly. Though we spent a lot of time in cars and on planes. And I got really sick one night, for no apparent reason. Be that as it may, it was nice traveling with friends. And we got to play for a lot of people at a bunch of packed shows, which was gratifying.

One (me and my band) is working, of course; making an effort to present these shows as best we can. I find that if one is having fun and is relaxed, the audience will feel that way also. It’s interesting that we work so hard but have so much fun doing that.
It’s difficult for me to sit down and tell stories and present memories. I think, as time passes, and we remember this time, certain events will stand out.

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I almost forgot to ask you. Last year I had the good fortune of interviewing Mary Lattimore, the Philadelphia-based harpist who plays with you on ‘For The World’. When discussing your music, Mary mentioned that there’s a really great story of how you lost the Tiple on a train and it was returned to you years and years later. I would love for you to tell me this story, please Ed.

EA: Tiple Poem, maybe 3 years ago:

he put down the tiple
annoyed at the weight
of the new wooden case
he had been carrying around
and sat on a bench
while waiting for the train
to New York
and i think
that it is true
that we are sometimes
punished for our
idiotic thoughts or moods
for when the train arrived
he just
stood up
and entered
the train
leaving the tiple behind
and now some 22 years later
he has apparently been forgiven
for this momentary lapse
by someone
who never knew he was ever annoyed
by the weight of the tiple
and case
because that lovely man
who was the one
who found the lost tiple
has tracked him down
and returned it

 

I think this explains it, more or less. I had written something about my history with that instrument for Fretboard Journal (see “HOW I GOT MY MARTIN TIPLE”:  https://www.facebook.com/enarcrane). And a the man who found the tiple was able to find me when his friend saw the magazine.

————

Can you please take me back to your earlier recordings. I would love to gain an insight into the making of ‘Ask The Unicorn’? Shortly before this time, you acquired your Martin Tiple and I was very interested to read that the majority of your songs were written during a teaching job for a prep school in Connecticut. Please take me back to this period of time in your life and what fond memories you have of this time-the mid-to-late sixties? As ever, music and art must have been closely inter-related and connected.

EA: I don’t think often about the 60s. I was in Art School for many of those years. I got a Masters in Fine Art from Yale in 1966. Liked being in art school. It was safe. I didn’t need a job. I could just paint, mostly. I had good friends, who also painted mostly. After that I worked at a school in Ridgefeald CT, I worked as a Night Watchman some time around then, lived home, had a girl friend, moved in with her in Brooklyn. She left. I lived in the lower east side. Signed with ESP Disk. Fell in love with a boy (didn’t work out), went to England for a week or two to see friends, moved back to New Haven. Met Carl, became lovers. Made Ask the Unicorn and started performing publicly. All between 1966 and 1968. I will probably write about it someday, when i am up to it. I made art. I made love, a lot (not at the privet school) I sang for the kids a lot. Drank a lot of vodka (at that time my “teaching” didn’t go all that well. But it kept me out of Vietnam. And some of the kids befriended me) I smoked too much dope. I wrote 25 or so songs.

————

Lastly, I’d like to thank you for the wonderful and insightful answers, Ed. Returning to the present, I would love to learn what you’re currently working on? Is there a series of paintings you’re in the midst of creating? (If so, I’d love to see an example of one such work). Also, in terms of music, are there new songs forming in your head, in the interim since the completion of ‘For The World’? I wish you all the best with these special projects and look forward to uncovering your next works of art.

EA: I am currently working on songs. I am hoping to have one or two harpsichord songs to put up on Bandcamp by the Summer. Also the Ed Askew Band has begun work on a second album for Tin Angel records. We have already recorded three tracks with Josephine Foster singing backup and, in one case singing a duet with me.

I have recently made 12 collages. you can see them on Flickr:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ecaskew/

I’m planning to do more of these when I have time. I make free form paintings on paper. Then I cut them up and use the material to make the collages.

————

edaskew_2

Paintings supplied by Ed Askew:

(i & iii) “here are two simple paintings I recently made. No title except “small objects series”. Both March 2014. 14′ x 11″ —Ed Askew

(ii) Self Portrait: “Dots 1970’s -1990”

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‘For The World’ is available now on Tin Angel Records.

http://edaskew.bandcamp.com/
http://eaband.tumblr.com/
http://www.tinangelrecords.co.uk/edaskew/

————

 

Don’t Look Back: 2013

with 2 comments

‘Don’t Look Back’ is a retrospective of sorts, looking back on the year that was — 2013 — and reminiscing on some of the cherished memories from the year. Having had the great fortune of crossing paths with many wonderful musicians, artists and all-round music enthusiasts these past twelve months, we would like to share with you a snapshot of the year from the perspective of some of these wonderful people. 

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Adrian-Crowley

ADRIAN CROWLEY (Dublin, Ireland)

Across a rich body of work (comprising six solo albums culminating with 2012’s magnificent ‘I See Three Birds Flying’), the Irish singer-songwriter’s peerless baritone immerses you into a deeply contemplative listening experience. The prose and storytelling of the master poet’s songs heightens all that surrounds you. This December marked the long-awaited release of the collaboration between Crowley and James Yorkston, ‘My Yoke Is Heavy-The Songs of Daniel Johnston’ released on the Glasgow-based independent label, Chemikal Underground.

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Forgive in advance, if you will what is sure to be a rambling and disjointed part reflection of the year gone by.
When I cast my mind on 2013, scenes like this spring to mind:
I’m in Amsterdam Central Station… or Amsterdam Centraal.
Before heading to the platform for Gare Du Nord, Paris, I decide I need to take care of some business.
There are plywood partitions everywhere, the sound of drills and circular saws fill the air and workmen are milling around in hi-vis jackets and jack boots. It’s freezing as it is January and icy blasts pervade the corridors and hallways of the station. I follow temporary signs. It soon becomes clear that all elevator service has been suspended because of the works so I find a stairs and haul myself up with all my things ( A hard case containing my guitar, a faltering wheelie case and a small rucksack that feels like it is filled with hard back bibles). The stairs bring me to a platform and there at the other end of it I see a *massive* WC sign. Huge black Roman letters on a white plastic board background. I put 50 c in the slot and as I’m squeezing through the turnstile I notice an old vagrant madwoman has commandeered the toilet attendant’s booth. I hang back for a moment, all my things slung around my person, bags and instruments. Then she squalks and barks at me and with a twisted painted index finger, she waves me by screeching something that rhymes with ‘men’.
I walk into the Heern area there are no cubicles just a sad row of improvised urinals and no wash hand basins. I head for the ladies area instead as they have cubicles in there. The unkempt toilet attendant turns into a typhoon of fury and screams that the cubicles are for women only. I try and wedge all my things through the narrow door all the while yelling back to her asking how she expects a gentleman to take care of business. A petite girl with a head scarf and long grey coat timidly holds the door open for me, quiet as a mouse.
Later as the Eurostar pulls away bound for Gare du Nord I sit back in my seat with my things stowed and tucked away. I reach for my headphones and wonder if it’ll be snowing in Paris.

I may have fallen asleep to the strains of Seti The First or Colleen and I may have dreamed of the furious toilet attendant starting to slowly rotate and gather her dark tendrils from every corner of the train station causing scaffolding to shudder and papers to fly about in a vortex as she transforms into a typhoon or a tropical revolving storm and disappears down a dark tunnel leaving shards and splinters in her wake and decimated suitcases.

2013 has seen me travel alone across Europe, station to station, in a sometimes delirious state.
It’s been a dream though. And at the same time it’s funny how things are reduced to basic things, like time keeping, eating, sleeping etc. All these things take on extra weight and magnitude.
There is a sense of the epic with otherwise innocuous things. Things that you would take for granted if you weren’t a voyager. It’s in this state of transit and transition that music shows another side to me.
And books too when I can manage to read. I must say that my affliction of a sometimes crippling motion sickness precludes me from reading on trains. It’s something that is always there. Gets worse at night and especially if I lie on my left side. Then I am spun around in a vertiginous whorl and wake in a panic. But music soothes.
And after a concert when I wearily trundle down a hotel corridor relishing the thought of my waiting room I sling my things across the floor and armchair and turn on the television. Hungry for some stimulation of drama /plot / humour English language/ …an antidote to the adrenaline that comes to me each night. A distraction. My records and CDs in boxes stacked on the sideboard. Again I think of myself as a lone traveling salesman / preacher from the last century selling bibles in some erratic trajectory across the map. I don’t know why. There must be a parallel somewhere.
And many is the time, be it in Zwolle or Copenhagen, Zarautz or Barcelona….I’ve found myself flicking on my laptop and searching for unwatched and new episodes of my new favourite series.
And it has been that the only way I could fall asleep was to the sound of a zombie apocalypse as The Walkers (The Walking Dead) invade the compound of the last survivors on Earth somewhere in the former middle America.

I remember one evening back in Dublin I was meeting a friend for a pint on Wellington Quay and we got talking about Breaking Bad and I was telling her who my favourite characters were and why Hank was my hero and how I had seen every episode including the finale…when the barman suddenly materialised at our table (only two seconds previous he had been behind the bar unloading glasses from the steam washer).
And there he stood in silent fury shaking his head slowly and making a zip gesture across his lips and then pointing his finger in my face. My friend Julie looked on in utter surprise. Then he spoke.
‘I can’t believe you are actually talking about Breaking Bad when it’s clear that most people in this room may not have finished Season 5 yet. You’re barred’.

This year I found myself queueing for a ticket in the lobby of The Lighthouse Cinema, or The Screen or The IFI..
I think my favourite film of this year was ‘Ain’t Them Bodies Saints’. Oh my golly gosh.
Casey Affleck is amazing. One of my favourite ever actors.
I went to Oblivion with my son. We love science fiction and he is at the age now where if we go to the cinema together it doesn’t have to be some CGI of an annoying remake of a talking cat. It was pretty slick but still I think ‘Moon’ by Duncan Jones towers high…my favourite science fiction since Solaris by Andrei Tarkovsky.

I haven’t seen ‘Blue Is The Warmest Colour’ yet. Maybe I’ll go next week.
Oh there was another film I loved but I can’t for the life of me remember what it was called.
It was a new American independent shot in black and white and involved a girl going to Paris for the weekend. What the hell was it called again? It had half her name in the title…

This Summer was good for reading. I went away for a few weeks to France and go through a few novels and short stories. ‘Cathedral’ by Raymond Carver. ‘Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children’ by Ransom Riggs…. ‘Shall We Gather At The River’ by Irish writer, Peter Murphy…
‘Kafka On The Shore’ by Haruki Murikami..‘True Tales Of American Life’ – edited by Paul Auster..
I have ‘Lights Out In Wonderland’ by DBC Pierre in my pocket at the moment.
And I bought a book of poetry at a reading in Ranelagh a couple of months ago. It’s beautiful.
It’s by Patrick Chapman and is called ‘A Promiscuity Of Spines’.

This Summer I went to The Galway Film Fleadh. There was the world premiere of an Irish directed feature film called Love Eternal. As I took my seat in The Town Hall..(with my folks and sister) I remembered this was where I saw my first ever film in the cinema. Directed by Brendan Muldowney and starring Pollyanna Mackintosh among others it prominently features a song of mine The Wishing Seat. At the risk of giving too much away, the songs occurs at the climax of the film. It’s uncanny how well the song fits. When the producer Conor Barry first approached me with the request to use the song, he gave me viewing copy to see what I thought. Like I said, it was uncanny how it fitted. I think that was my cinematic experience of the year when the opening chords of my song filled the cinema, accompanied by the beautiful cinematography. It’s still touring the festivals of the world and won’t be out for a while. It’s a fine, fine film.

2013 is also the year I rediscovered Blixa Bargeld. And the album he released last spring with Teho Teardo has got to be my favourite album of 2013.

Which lead me to discover for the first time a beautiful duet he recorded with Meret Becker called Stella Maris.
I asked two friends of mine in Cologne (Rita and Sabine) to teach me German.

Oh and this year I saw the Northern Lights for the first time in my life.
But that is another story.

Oh and how can I not mention:

playing with Emma and Vince from Geese to a full house Upstairs at The Grand Theatre in Groningen in January at Eurosonic…

seeing Kris Kristofferson play at Oosterpoort (also in Groningen ) in September while playing Take Root Festival…

Seeing Kevin Barry’s short film ‘Breakfast Wine’ at The Galway Film Fleadh – a gem.

The dream trip to Iceland with ‘Young Hearts Run Free’. A totally moving week and an honour to be invited and to share the adventure with such beautiful people. My heart is a flutter thinking about it.

Catching up with old friends in Reykjavik.

Fresh in my mind is the wonderful (three date travelling festival ) Stille Nacht which I joined in on in December…(a favourite of mine was the show in Lelystad – great atmosphere.)

Seeing Marissa Nadler play in Copenhagen while on tour there.

Crossing the bridge between Copenhagen and Malmo.

Sharing the bill with Efterklang, William Tyler, broeder Dieleman…in The Netherlands..

playing The Kevin Barry Room (not the same Kevin Barry as mentioned above!) in The National Concert Hall in Dublin with two cellists, Kevin Murphy and Mary Barnecutt … and a Steinway Grand Piano.

Playing my first concert in shorts and sunglasses (during a July heatwave) at The Iveagh Gardens, Dublin (opening for Beach House). My guitar pedals nearly melted.

Playing a very memorable show in Barcelona after the ceiling collapsed shortly before I was due to go onstage. No injuries…the show went on in an adjacent room. I still have a piece of plaster as a souvenir.

Recording with Seti The First. A mighty band.

Seeing Katie Kim play several times.

Playing in an old cinema in Zarautz, the Basque Country.

Touring, touring and more touring.

Starting a new album in November…(going to finish it soon)

Going to ‘The House Presents’ monthly club in North Strand, Dublin.

Releasing ‘My Yoke Is Heavy’ on Chemikal Underground.

Working on the ‘Age Of Not Believing’ project in London with Ben Eshmade, Harry Escott and loads and loads of others (album coming out soon).

Playing in the very beautiful Triskel Christchurch in Cork in November.
A very special place.

Oh and did I mention I saw the Northern Lights…?

—Adrian Crowley

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‘My Yoke Is Heavy: The Songs of Daniel Johnston’ by Adrian Crowley and James Yorkston is available now on Chemikal Underground.

http://www.chemikal.co.uk/artists/adrian-crowley
http://www.chemikal.co.uk

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goat

MR. STONEGOAT, GOAT (Korpilombolo, Sweden)

Hailing from Korpilombolo in Northern Sweden, Goat are responsible for some of the most transcendental rock ‘n’ roll creations for quite some time. The band’s universally-acclaimed debut record ‘World Music’ (released last year on Rocket Recordings) sees a spectrum of sounds and styles that are effortlessly combined: from psychedelia, afro beat, African, funk and soul to disco, rock, garage, blues. This December marked the release of the double-album ‘Live Ballroom Ritual’  which captures Goat’s live performance at Camden’s Electric Ballroom in London. 

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This year I haven’t read a book or seen a film. I never keep track with new releases of music. I have been listening to a lot of Beach Boys this year. There is just to much going on in popular culture. For me it’s always been like that. I have to shut off. Otherwise I can’t make music. And I haven’t seen a show either. Just fragments of bands playing at the festivals we’ve been playing on. No, that is not true. I loved seeing Holy Wave every night while we where touring in the US in march. Fantastic band. For the rock-group Goat it has been an interesting year for sure, learning how to play live and doing it on big stages. But more than that it has been like any other year. The commune has had it’s problems with tourism which has forced us to keep a low profile with our origin from now on. Other than that many children have been born and we have celebrated and rejoiced as normal. 2014 I look forward to play and travel with the Goat band some more and also finishing of our next album. I’m also gonna have my seventh child and I will become 25 in January, so I’m gonna have a couple of good reasons to party next year. What I wish more is that the world 2014 comes a little bit closer to acknowledge that individualism is our enemy, spirituality is our guide, and togetherness is happiness. We are all one. There is no boundaries. Peace out!

—Mr. Stonegoat

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‘Goat – Live Ballroom Ritual’ double album is available now on Rocket Recordings.

http://goatsweden.blogspot.ie
http://rocketrecordings.blogspot.ie

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laurelhalo

Cian Ó Cíobháin, An Taobh Tuathail (Galway, Ireland)

Cian Ó Cíobháin is the presenter of An Taobh Tuathail, a music show dedicated to promoting the very best in independent music. Cian’s show is broadcasted on RTÉ Raidió Na Gaeltachta on weeknights from 9 to 11pm, Monday to Friday. Cian also compiles a series of compilations which are made available for free download, at present the An Taobh Tuathail series is at volume 6. Additionally, Cian DJ’s at 110th Street, Galway, with Cyril Briscoe.

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In 2013 I LOVED…
LPs by My Bloody Valentine, Jessy Lanza, Laurel Halo, Oneohtrix Point Never & Chequerboard; surprise LP of the year was from These New Puritans, well worth spending time marinating in it; spending a magical break with my truelove in south Kerry last May, that lovely time of year as summer is slowly getting into her groove; successfully having laser eye surgery in mid-summer after a serious injury which resulted in six months of corneal pain made a huge change — for the positive — to my mood and sense of wellbeing; Thurston Moore live in Róisín Dubh, Galway accompanied by John Fahy simply confirmed that the former Sonic Youth frontman might still be the coolest man on the planet; continuing to meet great new people in clubs and at after-hours sessions; The Great Heatwave of July 2013; resurrecting old club night The Hive (a club for music lovers, by music lovers); being in Croke Park for Kerry V Dublin, possibly the greatest game of football I ever saw in the stadium, the superlative display from both teams numbed the pain of defeat; wonderful nights playing records in the Blue Note, Galway with my good friend Cyril Briscoe to people who truly know how to get down; genuinely amazing & unexpected fun DJ-ing at weddings in Co. Down and Co. Mayo (with a Funktion1 soundsystem), a whole new experience for me, I’m already taking bookings for weddings in 2014; the last season of ‘Breaking Bad’ was the most perfectly written season of TV I’ve ever had the privilege of seeing; having only made two pods/mixes during the first ten months of the year, I hit a November purple-patch with 4 new expressions of my musical interests VIA mixes & pods for The Hive, 110th Street, ATT & Shock; immersing myself in the books of Carl Sagan, what a wonderful & wondrous human being he was, indeed I read a great number of books this year … aside from immersing myself in music, reading is my sanctuary; those wonderful and inspiring mails I get from listeners of my show, from the most personal to the most flippant, I love each and every one of you, keep them coming, they are my Ready Brek during these dark winter mornings.

—Cian Ó Cíobháin

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‘An Taobh Tuathail VOL 6’, compiled by Cian Ó Cíobháin, can be downloaded for free HERE.

http://www.rte.ie/rnag/an-taobh-tuathail/

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Moonface

Siobhán Kane, Young Hearts Run Free (Dublin, Ireland)

Siobhán Kane runs Dublin-based collective Young Hearts Run Free, which (since 2008) organizes music and literary events in unusual spaces across Dublin, in aid of the Simon Community. The next event being organized by Young Hearts will be a very special concert at Dublin’s Christ Church on New Year’s Eve. The gala concert comprises an extensive lineup featuring the wonderful talents of Moonface (Jagjaguwar) and Alasdair Roberts (Drag City). Siobhán Kane’s journalistic and literary talents can be seen in many musical and cultural sections of the press, and has written in the past for The Wire, Thumped, The Irish Times and The Quietus. 

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In a way, looking back on the year feels like remembering light, as it has been a year full of unexpected, heartening experiences.

One of my favourite things this year has been some of the experiences running Young Hearts Run Free. I have been doing it since 2008, and it has been a real labour of love. I have about three jobs that are quite time-consuming, and didn’t realise that Young Hearts was also going to take up so much time, but it is worth it. It kind of places everything out of a fuzzy focus, and distills so much of what I love about living in Dublin; particularly people’s open-heartedness, and sense of adventure, which is good, as I am always thinking of unusual venues, and odd ideas to carry out.

This year saw some real highlights of the project so far; Andy Irvine singing The Blacksmith (among other things) in the House of the Dead on Ushers Island, providing a very emotional evening for many of us, or our pub skip around the city with an intimate, willing audience with musicians like Alasdair Roberts, and Lisa O’Neill, or taking the project to Iceland Airwaves, with Dónal Lunny, Adrian Crowley, Katie Kim, The Spook of the Thirteenth Lock, and Conor O’Brien.

That whole experience in Reykjavik now resembles a misty dream I feel I had once. I felt like my teenage self had burst through the pages of my novel as an adult and made it happen. We raised a good amount for Konukot, the homeless women’s shelter there, and had two brilliant showcases; one in Lucky Records, and the second in the Volcano Museum. Before the musicians had gone to Iceland, they had been in touch with each other about potentially collaborating on some songs together, and they eventually landed on Cúnla, A Pair of Brown Eyes, and On Raglan Road.

It’s hard to describe the feeling when those collaborations eventually happened live, and the tender excitement and enthusiasm shown by each musician was humbling, and the experience rejuvenated my fatigued self, because it reminded me of partly why I wanted to set up Young Hearts in the first place, in the hope that some kind of magic might happen. I couldn’t have imagined going with a better group of people, we had so much fun, and even now, writing about it, reminds me of how lucky I am to know such lovely, generous people, who have become friends.

We are now getting ready for our New Year’s Eve concert in Christ Church Cathedral, which to be honest, doesn’t really seem real. From the days of doing crazy events in the basement space of Clarendon House to this, has been an unexpectedly emotional journey, and at times severely anxiety-inducing, but ultimately it has meant so much, not least because of the money we raise for the Simon Community, but how it raises hearts, and brings out some really great people, and that has been something of an anchor in really difficult times the last few years.

It also reminds me of one of my favourite records of the year, because we are bringing over Moonface/Spencer Krug to play, who has always been an intriguing musician, whether when playing as part of Wolf Parade, or Sunset Rubdown, or his collaborations with Dan Bejar, I am always interested! And I really fell in love with his new record on Jagjaguwar, Julia with Blue Jeans On – it is possibly my favourite record of the whole year; elegant, epic, and emotional music – just his voice and the piano, everything is stripped right back to reveal something so true – anguish, pain, and love, it’s all there.

Some of my other favourite records of the year come from Alasdair Roberts, with his A Wonder Working Stone (Drag City) and his recent collaboration with the poet Robin Robertson Hirta Songs (Stone Tape Recordings) – both are very different, but they  harness an unusual tone of storytelling, it is so singular, and with Hirta Songs, the two singular artists totally transport you into a different world filled with sea imagery and sad farewells.

In a slightly different sense, this could also be said of Adrian Crowley and James Yorkston’s record – a loveletter to Daniel Johnston’s work – My Yoke is Heavy (Chemikal Underground) – this came as quite a late gem in the year, and has kept me quietly moving company ever since; sad and brilliant.

It does seem like so many of my favourite records tend to be sad ones – so I need to jazz this up a little by hurtling through some other, more rather upbeat compositions. I was very excited by Beyoncé’s record, and am enjoying that at the moment, Fuck Buttons’ Slow Focus is excellent, as was Colin Stetson’s New History Warfare Vol. 3: To See More Light – he is such an exceptional musician, and his work on the saxophone is so subtle, and fascinating, and when experienced live honestly provides goosebumps – as for him, the work is almost an athletic endeavour as well as creative. I loved Villagers {Awayland} – particularly songs like My Lighthouse and The Waves, and Julia Holter’s dreamy Loud City Song, and Laurel Halo’s Chance of Rain.

There have been so many good records this year, like John Grant’s Pale Green Ghosts, and Pusha T’s My Name is My Name – he is just so good, and I have always been a fan of his from his Clipse days. M.I.A.’s Matangi has some mind-bending production, as does Jon Hopkins’ Immunity, and the atmosphere on Forest Swords’ Engravings is slow-burning and immersive – off-kilter brilliance. And I am also now thinking about El-P’s and Killer Mike’s collaboration Run the Jewel’s because I have always been slightly obsessed with El-Producto, and think him a wonder, and was a willing lemming for most Def Jux releases – as I was for Rawkus – it’s nice when you have a fidelity to a label, I still check in with Stones Throw, but there are so many great independent labels trying to make wonderful things happen – I am a devotee of Light in the Attic Records in particular, they bear witness on so much good unheralded or out of print work, as well as underrated and unusual artists. Goodness, if I start writing about record labels I won’t stop.

Bill Callahan’s Dream River is one of my favourite records of the year. I used to have quite a fractious relationship with some of Callahan’s earlier work, but I genuinely love it now, there is so much poetry in it, and his voice just knocks me over into a swoon. His new record is pared back beauty, and his imagery is so evocative, he always returns back to the idea that though acute ecstacy can be achieved, you must always fall back to earth, but need to continue to pursue true happiness, continue getting back up. The record possesses a calm that I have really responded to. He has recently said that he knows what his next record is going to be, and it is going to be his “best yet”, so I am giddy in anticipation. The National’s Trouble Will Find Me has also kept me good company, with its interesting lyrics, and Matt Berninger’s yearning, crumpled vocal that captures such true feeling. Mark Kozelek & Jimmy Lavelle’s Perils from the Sea is a great meeting of minds, as Lavelle’s subtle electronica is a perfect foil for Kozelek’s heavy load, and Deerhunter’s Monomania was all delightfully creaky dream pop bric-a-brac. I thought Arcade Fire’s Reflektor contained a strange joy, and then there were people that came back that I had missed, such as Paddy McAloon – one of my favourite ever musicians, and I really enjoyed Prefab Sprout’s Crimson/Red – it’s so much about love, maybe, and McAloon does it so elegantly, cleverly, and always from the heart. I also liked Boards of Canada’s Tomorrow’s Harvest a lot, and Oneohtrix Point Never’s R Plus Seven, Low’s Invisible Way, Charles Bradley’s Victim of Love, and it was nice to have Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds go away from Grinderman work and towards Push the Sky Away – I just really liked the luscious composition and erudite lyrics. The same could be said of David Bowie’s The Next Day, I was so glad that he just popped up with such understated elegance.

There are so many other great records, but this is getting too long and this is without writing about the books I have lived with, concerts gone to, and films and television watched, so I will whittle down as best I can to a semblance of other things from the past year.

Music and books are probably the things I love most, so it’s hard to go back on the year, but I just got round to reading Grant Morrison’s excellent Supergods: Our World in the Age of the Superhero,and Eimear McBride’s surreal and gripping A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing. Morrissey’s Autobiography was a delight, as was Tracey Thorn’s Bedsit Disco Queen, it was so well-written and revealing, and she zaps you right into the period, the politics, and the cultural references. In a weird way, her book, and Morrissey’s, greatly complemented each other, although Morrissey’s book often made me laugh out loud, he has such a gift with language, that I was often quite dazzled by it. I always have some John McGahern on the go, and am re-reading some of his earlier short stories at the moment in the collection Nightlines. I am also reading Lockout by Padraig Yeates – it has been so inspiring, all this work around the Lockout, and so topical. Alex Ferguson’s autobiography was illuminating and David Peace’s Red or Dead was an epic achievement. I also re-read Mary Robinson’s autobiography Everybody Matters, as she is a great beacon, and there are so many other things! I also liked the children’s book Heap House, by Edward Carey, it is so funny and imaginative. and James Salter’s All That Is, and also the really sad, but completely engaging Woody Guthrie’s Wardy Forty: Greystone Park State Hospital, about the five years Woody spent as a patient at the Greystone Park State Hospital – it’s really moving, and I read the reissued Stoner by John Williams, which just floored me – it made perfect sense that John McGahern did the introduction to it – there is a definite sympathy between those two writers, somewhere – perhaps in the examination of a quiet tragedy, which are almost always the worst.

Concert-wise it is so hard to write highlights, because there have been so many, but some that come to mind would be The National in the Marquee in Cork, The Walkmen at La Maroquinerie, Paris, and The Walkmen at the End of the Road festival in Dorset, and there they dedicated a song “to the late, great Seamus Heaney” as he had passed away only a few days before, little did I know that would be the last time I saw The Walkmen together – live – as a band (for now, hopefully). One of my other highlights was seeing Grizzly Bear in Iveagh Gardens in Dublin. Iveagh Gardens is very special to me, and I never thought I would see one of my favourite bands there – it was very magical, very surreal, and very moving. There were a few lovely evenings there, including the dreamy Beach House, but really all my heart was full of for so long was Grizzly Bear in Iveagh, they spin a magic that is hard to describe, it transports and means so much (to me).

Dan Deacon in Whelans in the earlier part of the year was just brilliant but he always somehow lifts, no matter what is going on in your life, he radiates so much warmth and fun and love, also Winged Victory for the Sullen at the National Concert Hall was genuinely beautiful, Angel Olsen in Whelans was another highlight, just her and her guitar, she was mesmerising, and kind of resembled a lovely cat singing, and then Thee Oh Sees in Whelans were another highlight, they make you feel like you are 14 and you are going to take on the world and win. That was how I felt also with Konono No.1 in Whelans. Looking back there were so many great concerts, how lucky I was to have gone to so many; Public Enemy in the Button Factory, Egyptian Lover in the Sugar Club was hilarious and great, Why? in Whelans, Colleen in the Unitarian Church supported by Seti the First was shimmering, subtle beauty, Immortal Technique in the Sugar Club was raw, indignant and great, Chromatics/Glass Candy in the Village. Lee Fields in the Sugar Club was one of the best things I have ever been to, experiencing Ennio Morricone at IMMA was a really special thing, and The Music Tapes in the Workmans Club were so charming, and had a little game for the audience to play at the end. I really loved Low in Whelans, and the day after Tame Impala in the Olympia – I felt quite delirious about those two days. Also, Charles Bradley in The Sugar Club was fizzing with energy, and he had a costume change or two, which I admired, and I also enjoyed Villagers Christmas homecoming with Stargaze in Vicar Street.

There were many other things too, like experiencing comics such as Reggie Watts, Stewart Lee, Eddie Pepitone and David O’Doherty, and recently I got to see Harry Shearer in London do a Christmas revue of sorts, with his wife and several guests, and on the same trip, I caught Dan Bejar at Bush Hall doing a solo set, it was around the release of his latest EP, but he also revisited so much of his work from Destroyer’s Rubies, Kaputt and other records – it was such a delight to experience – particularly as he said he won’t be playing again until 2015. My memory is quite scattered at present, and I am sure that I will have forgotten experiences that have made my year, but I know it means that there have been lots – I look to mainly experiences shared with people, such as festivals like Primavera, or End of the Road, or Iceland Airwaves – I think of the feeling of being glad to be alive when David Byrne and St. Vincent performed on the Friday night at End of the Road, or when Belle & Sebastian took to the stage at the very same festival, or when John Grant and Conor O’Brien duetted on Glacier at Wiltons Music Hall in London, or feeling devastated in Croke Park with my Dad when Mayo lost the All-Ireland (again), but happy for Dublin to win, if someone else had to. On the other end of the spectrum, there are all those things you might experience alone sometimes – and for me, this year, it has been cackling at Louis CK on his perfect show Louie, or anything Larry David has done or will ever do, or being freaked out by the most violent bits of Homeland, revisiting one of my favourite shows Northern Exposure, feeling genuinely bereft when Breaking Bad finished, being immersed in Eileen Gray’s show at IMMA, and just all those simple times spent reading, walking by the sea and cycling – those things are great things to look back on with fondness in 2013, and all the cosy times spent with family and friends.

Lastly, all the films that have come out this year – there have been so many good ones – I really loved Philomena, and Good Vibrations, and Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine elicited an astonishing performance by Cate Blanchett, Before Midnight was charming and sad and true, and hopeful (hopefully), and made me want to take off for Greece, Blue is the Warmest Colour was so affecting, and I got to see the Coen Brother’s new film Inside Llewyn Davis, which is beautiful and has such an odd atmosphere, and the documentary Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me – was good, and sad (a common theme!), and another interesting music documentary Beware of Mr Baker – about drummer Ginger Baker was excellent, though he is quite scary, and The Selfish Giant was lovely.

It’s strange to look back on the year, I know I will have forgotten so much, but it is a great exercise, because it reminds me of all that is good in the world, when things are so often difficult. The arts, like Laurie Lee once wrote (although it was about love) are like “the oil that plumps us up, dilates the eyes, puts a glow on the skin, lifts us free from the weight of time”. I hope that 2014 provides more of the same, where we can all live in the “private grip” of such beauty and inspiration. It helps us to understand ourselves more.

Siobhán Kane

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Young Hearts Run Free present: Moonface, Alasdair Roberts, Dónal Lunny (and more) at Christ Church, Dublin, this New Year’s Eve. Doors 8pm, tickets in aid of the Simon Community.

http://youngheartsrunfree.ie

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Benoît Pioulard (Seattle, USA)

Benoît Pioulard is the alias for Seattle-based composer Thomas Meluch, who has to date released a string of formidable albums on Chicago-based independent label Kranky, culminating with this year’s stunning ‘Hymnal’. A very special compilation ‘Hymnal Remixes’ will be available on 21 January 2014, featuring remixes by Brambles, Fieldhead, Loscil, The Remote Viewer and many more. Pre-orders can be made now (including exclusive immediate download of 5 tracks) HERE.

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My favorites of the year:

Book : ‘Tenth of December’ by George Saunders
Film : ‘Leviathan’
Album : ‘Tomorrow’s Harvest’ by Boards of Canada

—Thomas Meluch

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‘Hymnal’ by Benoît Pioulard is available now on Kranky.

http://pioulard.com
http://www.kranky.net

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marylattimore

MARY LATTIMORE (North Carolina, USA)

Mary Lattimore is a Philadelphia-based harpist whose name has become synonymous in independent music circles as both a gifted solo composer as well as a versatile and accomplished collaborator. ‘The Withdrawing Room’ is the debut solo album by Mary Lattimore, released earlier this year on Desire Path Recordings. Limited to three hundred copies on black vinyl, the album draws from drone, ambient, folk and world music traditions. Lattimore’s harp compositions can be compared with Julianna Barwick’s choral-based harmonies, where both artists loop their chosen instrument to magnificent effect. Mary Lattimore has collaborated with a vast array of musicians to date, including Thurston Moore, Ed Askew, and Sharon Van Etten.

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Hi from North Carolina, here on my parents’ farm.

Favorite Things of 2013 List

Favorite Records (in no order)
Grouper – The Man Who Died In His Boat
Julianna Barwick – Nepenthe
Nils Frahm – Spaces
Daniel Bachman – Jesus I Am A Sinner
Sarah Neufeld – Hero Brother
Kurt Vile – Wakin on a Pretty Daze
True Widow – Circumambulation
Brent Arnold – Night, Exquisite
I Am The Center: Private Issue New Age In America compilation
Chris Forsyth – Solar Motel
Purling Hiss – Water on Mars
Emerald Web – The Stargate Tapes (Reissue)
Neil Young – Live at the Cellar Door
My Bloody Valentine – MBV
Steve Gunn – Time Off
William Tyler – Impossible Truth
Body/Head – Coming Apart
Mark Kozelek and Jimmy LaValle – Perils From the Sea
Michael Chapman – Wrecked Again (Reissue)
Chance – In Search (Reissue)
William Onyeabor – Who is William Onyeabor? (Reissue)

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Favorite song of 2014
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsoqmFL1vlU

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Favorite new place
Asbury Park, NJ

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Favorite shows of 2013
Body/Head at Union Pool (NYC)
War on Drugs New Year’s Eve at Johnny Brenda’s (Philly)
Cass McCombs at Boot and Saddle (Philly)
Ed Askew Band (Philly and NYC)
Sun Ra Arkestra at Union Transfer (Philly)
Spiritualized at Union Transfer
Julianna Barwick at Mann Music Center (Philly)
Sarah Neufeld and Colin Stetson at World Cafe (Philly)
Chris Forsyth and the Solar Motel Band residency at Ortlieb’s (Philly)
Spacin at the Philly Record Exchange
Animal Collective Halloween at Union Transfer
Belle and Sebastian at Mann Music Center (Philly)
Woods/Parquet Courts at Morgan’s Pier (Philly)

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Favorite performance experiences of 2013
Playing in Grand Central Station (NYC) accompanying 60 dancers wearing visual artist Nick Cave’s Soundsuits twice a day for a week. Was truly an amazing experience.

Playing a few covers with Jeff Zeigler, Sharon Van Etten, and Adam Granduciel (War on Drugs) for a benefit for the Rail Park in Philly. We played a Big Star song, a Lou Reed song, and one of Sharon’s. Sooo much fun with those guys.

Little tour with Jeff Zeigler and Daniel Bachman, sleeping in this beautiful room in the incredible Coward Shoe in Baltimore.

Opening for Jeff Mangum with my great Tall Firs friends Aaron and Dave.

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Favorite Art I Saw in 2013
Mike Kelley at MoMA P.S.1 (NYC)
James Turrell at Guggenheim
Outsider Art exhibit at Philadelphia Museum of Art
Wharton Esherick House in Malvern, PA
Anthony Campuzano: Local Color
Psychedelic poster exhibit at Smith College in Northampton, Mass

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Favorite Day
Greatest birthday this year, thanks to my friends Gary O, Adam, Faryal, Dana and Jan. Yogurt with fruit, the beach, recording with the War on Drugs, tarot reading, Eric Copeland/Kid Millions/J Spaceman show, going down late at night to get close to those towers of light that they project to represent the World Trade Center, with all of the hundreds of white birds spinning and swirling in the light, so unreal. Was a perfect day. 

—Mary Lattimore

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‘The Withdrawing Room’ by Mary Lattimore is available now on Desire Path Recordings.

http://marylattimore.net
http://www.desirepathrecordings.com

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M.C. TAYLOR, HISS GOLDEN MESSENGER (North Carolina, USA)

Hiss Golden Messenger comprises the Durham, North Carolina songwriter M.C. Taylor and multi-instrumentalist Scott Hirsch, who resides in Brooklyn, New York. Additionally, Terry Lonergan plays drums and percussion and – together with Hirsch and Taylor – combine to form one of the finest rhythm sections around. Hiss Golden Messenger’s four studio albums to date – culminating in 2013’s magnificent ‘Haw’ (available now on the North Carolina-based label Paradise Of Bachelors) – confirm Hiss Golden Messenger’s place to the forefront of the Americana music tradition, like Whiskeytown and Uncle Tupelo before them.

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Your personal favorite album from the year?

As far as new records, I’d probably say William Tyler’s Impossible Truth. I spent a lot of time on the road with William and heard those songs in various iterations. I think what William is doing — his whole process and aesthetic — is really beautiful and singular, very thoughtful and inspirational. There’s nobody else making music like he is.

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The music you found yourself listening to the most during the year?

Anytime anyone asks me what I’ve been listening to, I suddenly can’t remember. But I just looked at my phone, and was reminded how much I love Steve Gunn’s Time Off . Also, Lal Waterson’s Teach Me to Be a Summer Morning was a gorgeous set of recordings; she later made Bright Phoebus with her brother Mike, which drew on some of this material, and is a pretty foundational album for me. Gal Costa’s India is something I’ve spent a lot of time with lately, as is African Songbird, by Sathima Bea Benjamin. Oh, and the Cocteau Twins’ Heaven or Las Vegas is something I’ve been revisiting. What a great, great album. Anything by Ann Peebles too, I really like her music — Straight From the Heart is the album of hers that I’ve listened to most recently.

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Fondest memories of touring ‘Haw’ in US and EU?

It’s rare for me to not have a good time playing music anywhere, but my 2013 was bookended by some very special shows. In February of 2013, I was honored to take part in a round robin performance with my pals Heather McEntire (of Mount Moriah), Phil Cook (of Megafaun) and Amy Ray (of the Indigo Girls) in my hometown of Durham, North Carolina. Then, at the end of October, I played my last show of the year at the Haw River Ballroom in the rural town of Saxapahaw, NC, with friends The A’s (Amelia and Alexandra from Mountain Man) and Brad and Phil Cook (from Megafaun). The Haw River Ballroom is, in my opinion, among the most beautiful performance venues in the Western Hemisphere, and it was a real gift to play there.

William Tyler and I also toured the UK by train for the second time in May, which presented its own unique set of challenges but is a pretty incredible way to see that part of the world. Our last show of that trip was recorded and is available to hear as London Exodus.

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Most special moments from 2013?

My wife and I had a baby girl, Ione Clare, on July 1st, 2013. Everything about this year was centered around her arrival. Now we’re learning about life with two kids!

I’ve been very lucky to continue to make music with my longtime friend and musical partner Scott Hirsch (who also had a baby girl, Issa, this year). We just completed the recording for the next HGM album, which will come out sometime this fall, and we were so fortunate to involve many of our friends, including Brad and Phil Cook, Terry Lonergan, Matt McCaughan, Alexandra Sauser-Monnig, Chris Boerner, William Tyler, Matt Douglas and others.

—M.C. Taylor

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‘Haw’ by Hiss Golden Messenger is available now on Paradise Of Bachelors.

http://hissgoldenmessenger.blogspot.ie
http://www.paradiseofbachelors.com

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Sorcha-Richardson

SORCHA RICHARDSON (New York, USA / Dublin, Ireland)

Born in Dublin, Ireland, Sorcha Richardson is a New York-based songwriter. 2013 saw the release of Sorcha Richardson’s latest EP ‘Last Train’ on Paris-based independent label Crosswalk Records. An earlier EP  ‘Sleep Will Set Me Free’ from 2012 (featuring ‘I Heart NYC’ and ‘Birds Of Summer’) would establish recurring themes in Richardson’s songwriting — longing, connection, and a deep sense of place — where the surroundings of New York would have a growing impact on her musical output. To date, Richardson has also collaborated with numerous acts, including New York electronic outfit Colossal Mantis and the hip hop-infused project CON VOS, who release their debut EP ‘Cocoon Bloom’ in January 2014. 

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I rang in 2013 at a New Years party in a cottage in Wicklow. I was home from New York at the time, with a five-week Christmas break from college, so I packed as much music into those winter weeks as I could. By the end of January I had played at Whelan’s Ones To Watch Festival, travelled to London to meet with some music folk, played a sold out show Upstairs in Whelan’s (with a beautiful set from Little Rivers to open the night), travelled to Kaiserslautnern, Germany with my two bandmates, where we stayed in a hotel that had just been renovated from a prison (the hotel rooms kept all of the features of the prison cells), did some German radio promo, played to a packed out venue and then went on a bar crawl with the locals before flying home and going straight to the studio from Dublin airport to finish recording some songs for my EP. While at the studio I received an email from a hip-hop duo in New Jersey, interested in starting an indie-pop group and recording an EP. That was not an email I was expecting to get or a project I thought I’d become involved with, but within three weeks CON VOS was formed and our debut EP was complete.

Music took a bit of a backseat from February to May while I was busy finishing college. I majored in fiction writing and minored in film studies the nature of my degree meant that my final projects consumed a huge amount of creative energy. It feels like I spent every spare minute either reading or writing for those four months. But before I graduated, I skipped out of New York for a few days to visit some friends in LA. Then we drove down to Southern California for Cochaella, a festival I have wanted to visit for years, long before living I had any idea of living in America in my late teens and early twenties. That was one of the most fun weekends of the year.

I graduated college in May and then flew home to Dublin for a string of Irish shows. I played a headline show at The Workman’s Club with the super talented Liza Flume supporting, as well as festival sets at Knockanstockan, Castlepalooza and Indiependence and a really enjoyable show at Roasted Brown Café in Temple Bar with I Have a Tribe and Kinds & Cavaliers.

When I flew back to New York at the end of August, I had no idea what I would do when I arrived. It was the first time I was coming into the city with no plan in place. Since returning, some of the highlights have been moving to Brooklyn, spending a weekend at the Toronto Film Festival, releasing my EP, Last Train via Paris indie label Crosswalk Records, seeing Stevie Wonder play a show in Central Park, seeing Drake and Kanye West play at the Barclay’s center, seeing Laura play in a little church in Borough Hill, introducing CON VOS to the world in the form of Coast and Central Park, two tracks taken from our forthcoming EP, and have a very quintessential Thanksgiving with college friends in New Jersey and Philadelphia.
I’m really looking forward to getting home for Christmas and to be finishing out the year with a gig at Whelan’s on Dec 30th. Sails and Fears, two of my favourite Irish bands of the year, are supporting, so I’m really happy to have them on the bill. I’ve had both bands on repeat since discovering their music. Some other musicians that have soundtracked my year include Daughter, Wilsen, Foals, Jessie Ware, Haim, Lorde, Sampha, Drake, Kendrick Lamar, Kanye, Kyson, Volcano Choir Polica, FKA Twigs, Villagers, Blood Orange, Winter Aid, Slow Skies, I Have a Tribe, Rae Morris, Lovelier Other, Pale Seas and London Grammar. American Hustle, Behind the Candelabra and Enough Said were all films that I enjoyed a lot and Breaking Bad, VEEP, Modern Family and Friends were most commonly played on TV.

—Sorcha Richardson

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‘Last Train EP’ by Sorcha Richardson is available now on Crosswalk Records.

http://sorcharichardson.com
http://crosswalkrecords.com

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James-Murphy

YVONNE MCGUINNESS (London, UK / Cork, Ireland)

Yvonne McGuinness is an Irish artist who is currently living and working in London. McGuinness’s practice encompasses performance, video, photography and writing. Her work often takes the form of video works, which are sometimes a documentation of a performance or a stand alone film. Recent works such as ‘Procession’ (2012) where she staged a procession on the island of Inis Oírr off the West Coast of Ireland which was documented and made into film. Another recent work the film ‘This is between us’ (2011), was about the artists relationship with her mother. 

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2013. It was a good one for me. I got out more, I saw more things, I heard more things. I went to Body and Soul for the first time and never wanted to leave. Apart from the the bigger gigs (Jon Hopkins and James LCD Soundsystem my favs) I never wanted to leave the ‘our house’ tent. Every night it rocked with unpretentious hands in the air songs and I haven’t danced liked that since 1999. I try to be an artist but most of the time I lament on not being one but then I see certain shows and I think there’s a place for me and desperately want to make things. Laure Prouvost and her show at the Whitechapel, London was one of those catalyst moments. She’s French, she’s just won the Turner Prize — a bit too prematurely I think — so you’re going to know a lot more about her. She makes films that are funny, odd and brilliant and they stay with you despite their constant shift in register with sound and image. Place and event and all time good community festival and just a really positive weekend was Feile Na Bealtaine in Dingle. This is run by the community which is what we Irish are good at. It was heartfelt and uncommercial and I met some amazing people. Every night there was something great on, one of my best gigs of the year was This Is How We Fly at the St James Chapel, home of Other Voices, get their new album it’s stunning. On a closing note I’m reading ‘The Golden Notebook’ again, by Doris Lessing. She just died, she was a fierce lady, a Nobel Lauriet and she’s off somewhere now with Seamus Heaney, Lou Reed, Nelson Mandela and Peter O’Toole doing the do.

—Yvonne McGuinness

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http://yvonnemcguinness.com

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jon-Hopkins-Immunity

MARY NALLY, DROP EVERYTHING (Galway, Ireland)

Mary Nally is the creative force behind Drop Everything, a free contemporary cultural event which takes place in the picturesque surroundings of Inis Oírr, Galway. Designed to encourage and inspire creative exchange between artists and audience alike, 2013’s programme included No Way Back featuring Frank B, John Daly & Ger Z, Bande Apartment, February & Mars, White Collar Boy — among others — and a live set from Steffi & Virginia on Inis Oírr in July. Drop Everything’s 2014 festival will take place on Inis Oírr, Galway from 23rd to 25th May 2014.

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I’ve been asked for my highlights in everything. Now there’s been quite a few from breaking in the backdoor of the Nicolas Jaar party at some palazzo during the Venice Biennale to having the chats and super lolz with Richard James at Pleasure Principle.

Between 15 festivals, at least 7 significant parties, 5 live shows, a fair few art exhibits, one or two clubnights, a few random mad ones and all else in between… these, in no particular order but sort of chronologically are my top memories, highlights and magic moments from 2013.

1. –Lightshow at my absolute favourite Gallery ever the Hayward, David BatchelorCerith Wyn Evans and Jim Campbell’s pieces were particularly captivating and class in this group show.

2. –Beirut, one of the most interesting places I have ever been. I now am on first name terms with half of the publicans there, enjoyed more than one world class lunch at the restaurant Tawlet and can’t wait to go back and take up smoking and hang with the aul lads in the deadliest fucking record shop on earth.

3. -Dublin City’s most interesting festival (in my opinion) OFFSET, three days of not stop design talk brilliance. Kate Moross won with this line, “If you can’t do it. Learn how.”

4. -A roadtrip to Carrick-On-Shannon to the Phase One festival with the gent that is Cian Ó Cíobháin, the tunes & sandwiches he made us for said roadtrip definitely get a “the highlight of the year” award.

5. –Pleasure Principle in Cornwall. Not one bad set all weekend but TNGHT took the overall gold from me.

6. –Ballymaloe Lit Fest for some random foods, drinks and garden walks.  Alys Fowler is definitely one of my hero’s of the year.  Check out her column in the Guardian and have a go at planting things.

7. -VENICE,  The Venice Biennale, the highlight of my every two years. It needs no introduction and there’s no point in an explanation. It’s just everything. Art overload. Party overload. Prosecco overload. 2013 included moments like James Lavelle giving me his phone number, losing the phone ten minutes later and missing the flight home. Time of my life!

8. – Boris Festival of Writing and Ideas where PJ Harvey was the main draw but Michael Craig-Martin was the main event. What a legend.

9. – Body&Soul Festival, a given. JON HOPKINS was beyond a doubt the superstar of this show, although Mother’s rave in the woods under the stars and the sparkle of a discoball did hit all the magical notes.

10. – Inis Oírr, particularly the sunset on our impromptu party with Steffi & Virginia, a super special one that one will last long after the sun goes down on this year.

11. – John Gerrard’s show and lecture for this years Galway Arts Festival. Mindblowingly good.

12. – Inis Turk, lolled out there with a new crew of keepers, midnight swims and falling stars make for yearly highlights but our charted boat to Inishark to find the 4Bothies Gallery is stand out sensational.

13. – No Way Back – a party myself and my lil friends threw. I can safely say the John Daly/Ger Z combo dropping this track at 5am is the stuff that highlights are made from. But following nights lolz and stories with the bff crew on a rollover in a hotel called The Rio are the extra special moments that really count.

14. -The Electric Picnic gets a shout out, not for it’s messy site but for sets from BjorkThe Knife and the David Byrne/St.Vincent duo. Perfection at its best.

15. -Dinner and a Show with Neil Watkins and Co. Exceptional night at Dublin Fringe.

16. –Leonard Cohen one week and Fleetwood Mac another.

17. -Without a doubt the ultimate highlight of my year has nothing to do with music or lolz or amazing food, mind blowing art or a Rick Owens fashion show. It was October 1st, when a man named Herman Wallace was freed from prison. He spent over 40 years in solitary confinement for a crime he didn’t commit and finally his conviction was overturned. A bitter sweet victory. Know this mans story. A true, true hero.

18. -Watching a Saints game in a bar that is really more like a garage called Little’s People Place in New Orelans is major memorable as is the polar opposite tour of NeueHouse in Manhattan, incredible set up for the creative elite.

19.- October turning to November in Iceland. The Aurora Borealis lighting up the sky as I stepped out of Keflavík Aiport and waited for a bus to Reykjavík. There for Iceland Airwaves and it’s stars were Jon HopkinsSin FangMúm and Omar Souleyman. Also Sóley’s secret gig in her garage and the party we threw in a bar called Dolly with Clareman Daithí.

20. – The last weekend of November spent in a country manor somewhere in Meath surrounded by deadly pals when this tune dropped.

21. – The Dingle Peninsula. There for some Other Voices lolz – Alice Maher talking about life at Banter and scoring a ticket to see John Grant close the show in St James’ are up there in highlight territory… but looking out at the Blaskets on an overcast Monday afternoon and a drive over the Conor Pass seeing the December sun begin to set over Dingle Bay in the rear view mirror is how I’ll remember this trip.

And so it goes 2013. All that’s left now are a few debauched Christmas parties, reading all the newspapers ‘A Year in Pictures’, brandy & baileys with the bffs on Christmas Eve and dancing from 23.59 New Year’s Eve until the sun rises on 2014.

2013, done.
2014, let’s do this.
*update – oh and meeting this lad.

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Drop Everything will take place May 23-25, 2014 at Inis Oírr, Co. Galway, Ireland.

http://www.dropeverything.net

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LUCRECIA DALT (Berlin, Germany)

Colombian-born and Berlin-based artist Lucrecia Dalt released her latest album — ‘Syzygy’ — this October on Berlin-based independent label Human Ear Music. The album (follow-up to the wonderful ‘Commotus’) confirms Dalt’s status as one of the most intriguing composers making music today. Whereas previous album ‘Commotus’ stemmed from bass-driven compositions, ‘Syzygy’ finds Dalt shifting the sonic palette to a more dreamy, ambient-textured palette (she could not use the bass notes as her apartment was in close proximity to the metro line). Film provides much inspiration for Dalt’s practice as a musician, and cites the film work of John Cassavettes, Michelangelo Antonioni and Ingmar Bergman as influences for ‘Syzygy’. 

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List of favorite things from 2013

I have a top 2 records of the year: Jerusalem in my heart – Mo7it Al-Mo7it and Connan Mockasin – Caramel.
but,
there are random things I enjoyed a lot this 2013 like (just as they appear in my memory):

Mac Demarco – Rock and roll night club (the first song of this album)
the concert that “Don The Tiger” gave at Miscelanea in Barcelona
the concert that “za!” gave at Apolo in Barcelona
the concert that Stephan Mathieu gave at KW in Berlin
Julia Holter performing “try to make yourself a work of art”, Corey (the drummer) suggested once to do an extended version of it, I couldn’t agree more!
Touring with Suuns
I hate absinthe
Touring with Julia Holter
I love German wine
I also love Catalan wine
moving to Berlin
I miss the fruits in Colombia
there’s this track by Holden called ‘Seven Stars’
Playing darts with Jason Grier and Ekkerhard Ehlers.
I love Landjäger
Strangely, I stopped liking coffee this year, but I still like to smell it, prepare it, watching people enjoying a cup of coffee.
Realising that a group of people a la “Savage detectives” of Bolaño, existed in Berlin (and they are friends of mine)
Realising that Gena Rowlands is my favorite actress after seeing ‘Opening Night’ by John Cassavetes (and ‘Gloria’ and ‘A Woman Under The Influence’)
I think I saw ‘Deserto Rosso’ around 8 times this year, it was the movie that guided ‘Syzygy’ along with ‘Daydream’ (pink film from 1964), and ‘The Hour Of The Wolf’
I watched ‘Wild Blue Yonder’ by Herzog on a train.
I realised I love to make music on trains, I can say that I could make an album only on trains but that won’t happen.
Working in the production of a series of podcasts called “the utopia is possible: ICSID Ibiza, 1971” for the Radio Web Macba.
I like this Tirzah – Micachu song, a lot!
Best discoveries: Lauren Fairon, Camino al desván “581”, Krzysztof Komeda – “Alfred Behind Sledge”, Tools you can trust.
Most played song in November: Ween – “I play it off legit”
I’m not a library music geek, but there are two library music records that changed my life: Alessandro Alessandroni – Romance and Drama and Eric Vann – Bass Moods.
I realised that the music I like the most have a sixtisomething Italian touch to it.
I’m happy that the “meridian brothers” exist.
I still haven’t finished ‘Glass Bead Game’ by Herman Hesse.
I started to read ‘The House Of Leaves’ by Mark Z. Danielewski yesterday.
I made “inframince” on the 8th of January of 2013.
I tried to get lost in Barcelona but I couldn’t, it’s easier to get lost in Berlin.
I’m learning German, and trying not to forget Catalan.
I like Mirage Hall and Elli by Dirty Beaches.
Something important: I became a Spanish Citizen in 2013.
I became a better cook, it’s a bit scary because I could see myself being only a cook and…. ok ok, I will keep up with my music, promise!
but, maybe I could just do mixtapes? oh nein.
My dearest (experienced) filmmakers: I wish I was working more in music for films, give me a call.
I liked doing shows on banana scent fog, light engineers always got a shiny eye look when I requested the fog machine.

—Lucrecia Dalt

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‘Syzygy’ by Lucrecia Dalt is available now on Human Ear Music.

http://www.lucreciadalt.com
http://www.humanearmusic.de

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directorsound

NICHOLAS PALMER, DIRECTORSOUND (Dorset, UK)

Directorsound is the moniker for Dorset-based musician Nicholas Palmer. As well as comprising one half of the musical duo The A. Lords (who collaborated with Mark Fry on 2012’s ‘I Lived In Trees’ album), Palmer’s Directorsound project has thus far created a string of gorgeous pastoral folk, jazz and exotica-inspired albums, culminating this year with the release of current studio album ‘I Hunt Alone’ (Second Language) and ‘Other Rivers’, a collection of fourteen previously unreleased Directorsound tracks (available now on Directorsound’s Bandcamp Page). 

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I’ll confess that fairly typically I’ve been largely ignorant of new musical releases this year. From what I have heard though the obvious standout was Áine O’Dwyer’s ‘Anything Bright Or Startling?’, a triumphant studio recorded culmination of the vast talents of its maker. Otherwise it’s been a year of boxsets. So, the 10 disc complete works of Mahler dominated my listening for several months. Then, partly for research for a record I’m due to make next summer I exploited the 50 year expiration of copyright of a whole load of classic Blue Note records by picking up a whole load of reissues for next to nothing. Art Blakey’s ‘Orgy in Rhythm Volume 2’ and Stan Getz’s ‘Cool Velvet’ being the standouts. I also finally completed my purchasing of all of Pharoah Sanders Impulse album’s with the superb ‘Elevation’.

Live highlights included the two-day Gamelanathon festival at the Southbank and catching the Diamond Family Archive a couple of times over the year. A little like watching Crazy Horse fronted by Robert Wyatt in the backroom of a London pub. I also had the great honour of playing the Second Language night at Café Oto on a superb bill with Colleen and Áine O’Dwyer who I had to dauntingly follow.

But mainly it’s been a year of staying in watching far too many films to mention. I had a period where I re-watched the entire filmography of Dario Argento films over successive nights. Only this time I finally bothered with Phenomena and was amazed by what I’d been missing. It could quite possibly have the most gloriously absurd end set-piece of any film I’ve watched in 2013 or indeed any other year. Then the Herzog season at the BFI gave me the wonderful and rare opportunity to see some of his films on the big screen. Worth noting too is John Pilger’s ‘Utopia’, that saw him return to the issues of his 1985 film ‘The Secret Country’ concerning Australia’s historical and contemporary treatment of its indigenous population.

This year’s reading has been somewhat dominated by academic musings and policy documents of which I won’t bore the reader with. But Steinbeck’s ‘East Of Eden’ perfectly accompanied me on a week’s rare unmusical holiday to Kerry at the end of a fine summer. Profound and ambitious family sagas are a wonderful traveling companion it would seem.

—Nicholas Palmer

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‘I Hunt Alone’ by Directorsound is available now on Second Language.

http://directorsound.bandcamp.com
http://www.secondlanguagemusic.com

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James McVinnie (London, UK)

James McVinnie is a highly prolific organist and keyboardist who released ‘Cycles’ – an album comprising organ pieces written by his Bedroom Community labelmate Nico Muhly – and also features Nadia Sirota, Chris Thompson and Simon Wall. McVinnie’s musical career to date has been a fascinating one; he was Assistant Organist of Westminster Abbey between 2008 and 2011 and he previously held Organ Scholarships at St Albans Cathedral, and at Clare College, Cambridge. McVinnie has also collaborated with many contemporary musicians – including Valgeir Sigurðsson, Sufjan Stevens, Sam Amidon and Beth Orton – demonstrating his immense musicianship and impressive versatility as a composer. ‘Cycles’ is available now on Icelandic independent label Bedroom Community. 

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One of the highlights of my 2013 was playing in Irene Buckley’s new score for Carl Dreyer’s iconic early film The Passion of Joan of Arc. Dreyer’s direction together with Renée Jeanne Falconetti’s astonishing portrayal of Joan of Arc has given this film cult status and is widely accepted as one of the most outstanding, harrowing and emotionally charged films of all time. If you haven’t seen it, then get on to it. Tragically, two separate fires destroyed two original versions of the film in quick succession soon after it was made, and for decades it was impossible to find an authentic version of what Dreyer had originally intended. In 1981 an employee of a Oslo mental hospital found several film canisters in a closet that were labelled as being The Passion of Joan of Arc. Miraculously, this version was found to be a copy of Dreyer’s original film prior to censorship by the church and state, and so in recent years this film has been in widespread circulation. We don’t know what music would have accompanied this film when it was premiered in 1928. Irene Buckley’s score was commissioned by the Cork International Film Festival and premiered in 2012 and is for organ, electronics and soprano. For me it is hard to imagine this film without this music. Irene’s skill at moulding and melding plainsong-like vocal melodies with ambient soaked electronics, punctuated and coloured by the organ adds another dimension to this harrowing piece of cinema. The bass frequencies of a pipe organ in a large acoustic are largely impossible to recreate successfully using even the best of sound systems. At several points throughout the film, Irene’s score calls for the lowest notes of the organ (made by sending air through pipes which are up to 32 feet in length) to be played simultaneously, creating throbbing, visceral sounds which are felt in the pit of the stomach rather than heard by the ear. We had three wonderful and highly charged showings of the film in Glasgow, Cork and in London’s Union Chapel and we drank buckets of Chablis after each one in order to recover.

Midsummer for me this year, as in previous years, was spent in Iceland. There is something wildly exhilarating about being there during the month of June. With nearly 24 hours of sunshine, everyone buzzes around on cloud nine. [There was a bizarre moment when Nico Muhly and I flew back to England for 48 hours to play at the St John’s May Ball in Cambridge – bizarre because it was suddenly dark at 11pm and people went to bed.] Whilst in Iceland I celebrated the wedding of two dear friends with many other dear friends on Viðey Island and then I got a tiny plane to the North West Fjords to play Bach for a week. I’ve been going to Iceland for years to holiday or to play in various music festivals, but it is wonderful to now be an official part of the diverse and inspiring group of artists at Bedroom Community. You can read about Cycles, my debut release of music by Nico Muhly here and you can buy it here. I’m really pleased with how this recording has turned out, both in terms of its sound but also how the physical CD looks. I returned to Iceland in August via concerts in Sweden to give a concert at the HallgrÍmskirkja, Reykjavik’s landmark church on top of the hill. It houses a spectacular Klais organ which is stunning both to look at and to listen to. Later in the year, in late October Bedroom Community offered an off-venue concert in the same church at the start of the 2013 Iceland Airwaves Festival. For me, this was one of the most memorable concerts of the year. It was wonderful to have played to a huge appreciative capacity crowd, many of whom were lying in the aisles gazing up at the church’s vaulted ceiling, and who would not necessarily have even considered the pipe organ as an instrument worth listening to. I also played a little concert in Kaffibarinn on the Yamaha home organ (think 1980s bossa nova, but expect much more), much of which you can hear on Yule 2013, Bedroom Community’s Christmas special album (get it here). There is a fun little clip of Bedroom Community’s Airwaves contributions here.

December has been busy with the usual round of Christmas carol services and concerts including appearances with various groups including the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra the choir of St James’s Palace. I’m looking forward to a busy start to 2014 with a couple of weeks of swimming and intensive music-learning in Iceland in preparation for a concert I’m giving in the Royal Festival Hall at London’s Southbank Centre on March 30th. Everyone should come – I’m playing works by Bach and a new piece specially composed for me by Martin Creed, artist and composer. I’m also planning recordings of Bach and another featuring more new music for the organ.

James McVinnie

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‘Cycles’ by James McVinnie is available now on Bedroom Community.

http://www.jamesmcvinnie.co.uk
http://www.bedroomcommunity.net

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Julia Kent by Fionn Reilly 06

JULIA KENT (New York, USA)

Vancouver-born and New York-based cellist Julia Kent released her third full-length solo album, ‘Character’, this year on the Leaf label. Alongside previous solo works ‘Delay’ and ‘Green and Grey’, Julia Kent has produced an immensely innovative and highly distinctive body of work to date. Kent had previously collaborated with numerous bands including Antony and the Johnsons’ ‘I Am A Bird Now’ album, where Kent’s cello playing provides the perfect counterpoint to Antony Hegarty’s distinctive vocals. 2013 saw Julia Kent tour extensively both in the US and Europe promoting her current solo album ‘Character’.

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For me, 2013 was a year filled with glorious music: records by The Necks, Helen Money, Teho Teardo, Lubomyr Melnyk, Lori Goldston, and many other artists were essential accompaniment to what felt like a lot of time spent in transit. Music is always a fascinating travel companion: it can take you on a parallel journey to the actual journey you are undertaking, creating a soundtrack to wherever you might find yourself. Different environments inflect what you are listening to, and vice versa. The records that I loved this year brought their own atmospheres to wherever I listened to them, whether a subway in New York City, a train somewhere in Europe, or an airport in that limbo territory that is unique to airports.

In terms of live shows: this year I had the joy of playing with Teho Teardo live for the first time: He’s a multifaceted composer whose music I have admired for a long time; he has a really special energy and it was wonderful to have the experience of playing with him and his fabulous cellist Martina Bertoni in Ferrara. Also in Italy, over the past year, I have been lucky enough to play in some spectacularly beautiful venues: churches, theatres, palaces, mountain towers and magical gardens. In Italy the venues and the audiences are always special, and I feel fortunate to have the chance to play there often.

This past year I also encountered the amazing pianist and composer Lubomyr Melnyk live for the first time, in a church, at the Reeperbahn festival in Hamburg. His performance was completely transcendent: an incredible flow of music like a waterfall, or some other natural phenomenon. And just last week here in New York I saw an equally transportative concert by Stars of the Lid (also in a church…churches are always such wonderful environments to hear music—but also chilly!).

Jordi Savall’s concert at the White Lights festival at Alice Tully Hall was another high point of the past year. It traced the relationships between various ethnic musics in the Balkan regions and was both conceptually and historically fascinating while, at the same time, immensely moving in a very elemental way. It demonstrated that, however trite it may sound, music is, indeed a universal language; a way of communication that I am very grateful to be able to share. I hope that this new year brings more opportunities to do that…

—Julia Kent

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‘Character’ by Julia Kent is available now on Leaf.

http://www.juliakent.com
http://www.theleaflabel.com

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happy holidays from nyc!

‘Happy Holidays from NYC!’, Julia Kent, December 2013.

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To conclude, we’d like to add our own list of our favourite albums (in no order) from 2013:

Nils Frahm – Spaces (Erased Tapes)
Julia Holter – Loud City Song (Domino)
William Tyler – Impossible Truth (Merge)
Holden – The Inheritors (Border Community)
Colleen – The Weighing Of The Heart (Second Language)
Julia Kent – Character (Leaf)
Hiss Golden Messenger – Haw (Paradise Of Bachelors)
Lucrecia Dalt – Syzygy (Human Ear Music)
The National – Trouble Will Find Me (4AD)
Jon Hopkins – Immunity (Domino)
William Onyeabor – Who is William Onyeabor? (Luaka Bop)
Laraaji – Celestial Music 1978-2011 (All Saints)
Eden Ahbez – Eden’s Island [Re-Issue] (Righteous/Cherry Red)

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We’d like to give our heartfelt thanks to everyone who has contributed their words, shared their wisdom, reflected on their music and — most importantly — given their time over the last twelve months. Most of all, we would like to say a very special thank you to each and every person for reading. We feel really fortunate to be able to do this and we hope to feature many more musicians and albums in the coming year.
Happy New Year.

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Fractured Air 06: Keeper Of Beauty (A Mixtape by Mary Lattimore)

with one comment

mixtape_marylattimore

To listen on Mixcloud:

http://www.mixcloud.com/Fractured_Air/fractured-air-06-keeper-of-beauty-a-mixtape-by-mary-lattimore/

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“These are some of my favorites right now!!” (Mary Lattimore)

“The Withdrawing Room” is the debut solo album of Philadelphia harpist, Mary Lattimore. Released earlier this year – limited to three hundred copies on black vinyl – the album draws from the worlds of drone, ambient, folk and world music, creating in turn a gleaming treasure of sacred sonic tapestries. Lattimore’s harp compositions can be compared with Julianna Barwick’s choral-based harmonies, where both artists loop their chosen instrument to magnificent effect. Mary Lattimore has collaborated with a vast array of musicians to date, including Thurston Moore (on his “Demolished Thoughts” LP) and Sharon Van Etten’s forthcoming album and follow-up to 2012’s “Tramp” LP.

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Tracklisting

01. Fleetwood Mac – Prove Your Love
02. Sharon Van Etten – You Didn’t Really Do That
03. Flip & the Dateliners – My Johnny Doesn’t Come Around Anymore
04. Washington Phillips – Lift Him Up That’s All
05. F.J. McMahon – Early Blue
06. Baird Sisters – Tracks
07. Shirley Collins and Albion Country Band – Poor Murdered Woman
08. 13th Floor Elevators – I Had To Tell You
09. Spacin’ – Sunshine No Shoes
10. Watery Love – Face the Door
11. Dead Moon – Fire in the Western World
12. William Onyeabor – Heaven and Hell
13. X Ray Pop – Ding Dong
14. Chance – Just Your Way of Tellin’ Me
15. Fursaxa – Moonlight Sonata
16. Brian Eno – Fullness of Wind
17. Weyes Blood – Romneydale
18. Nils Frahm – Went Missing
19. Ed Askew – Blue Eyed Baby
20. Samara Lubelski – Keeper of Beauty
21. Don Slepian – Awakening

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Track-by-track description by Mary Lattimore:

01. Fleetwood Mac – Prove Your Love
Off of the record with the scary-looking cover: Heroes Are Hard to Find

02. Sharon Van Etten – You Didn’t Really Do That
This is the first song I ever heard Sharon sing and I really like that keyboard part. Had the lovely pleasure of playing harp on her new record and I think she’s the coolest!

03. Flip & the Dateliners – My Johnny Doesn’t Come Around Anymore
From a Joe Meek compilation. I think it sounds really spooky. Ultimately, he killed his landlady.

04. Washington Phillips – Lift Him Up That’s All
I love his voice and his mysterious instrument that doesn’t exist anymore.

05. F.J. McMahon – Early Blue
This is a winter song to listen to in the car.

06. Baird Sisters – Tracks
My best friend Meg and her amazing sister Laura! Meg has solo records and I believe Laura does too. Meg was in the terrific band Espers, too. This song’s good for winter, too.

07. Shirley Collins and Albion Country Band – Poor Murdered Woman
Shirley’s pure, pretty voice makes it even more tragic.

08. 13th Floor Elevators – I Had To Tell You
Got obsessed with Easter Everywhere this summer. I fell for this band late, almost like I was saving the records until I had enough brainspace to become totally smitten. Totally there right now!

09. Spacin’ – Sunshine No Shoes
Summertime good vibes from our neighborhood, Fishtown in Philly.

10. Watery Love – Face the Door
My friend Richie wrote this song about us going for dinner with our friend Max after work.

11. Dead Moon – Fire in the Western World

12. William Onyeabor – Heaven and Hell
So many good, catchy songs on this reissue.

13. X Ray Pop – Ding Dong
Cutesy little 80’s French song that I like.

14. Chance – Just Your Way of Tellin’ Me
Johnny Cash’s stage manager/lighting guy/friend Chance Martin made this weird, wonderful psychedelic country record and the great label Paradise of Bachelors reissued it this year.

15. Fursaxa – Moonlight Sonata
She works at a hawk sanctuary in the mountains and lives right by the river. Fursaxa is my inspiration! Her music is gorgeous and solitary.

16. Brian Eno – Fullness of Wind

17. Weyes Blood – Romneydale
Another great friend from this part of Pennsylvania. Her new record is almost finished. I love this song.

18. Nils Frahm – Went Missing
Another obsession right now. I would love to see/hear him play someday.

19. Ed Askew – Blue Eyed Baby
Ed is a legend and his songs make people weep, they move people. I played harp on this one. Very proud of this record.

20. Samara Lubelski – Keeper of Beauty
A talented friend who’s like family.

21. Don Slepian – Awakening
Got this off of a comp called I Am the Center (Light in the Attic) that just came out. New Age songs for a peaceful atmosphere.

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To listen on Mixcloud:

http://www.mixcloud.com/Fractured_Air/fractured-air-06-keeper-of-beauty-a-mixtape-by-mary-lattimore/

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For our interview with Mary Lattimore, please click HERE.

“The Withdrawing Room” is out now on Desire Path Recordings.

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http://marylattimore.net
http://www.desirepathrecordings.com

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Written by admin

December 2, 2013 at 11:25 am

Chosen One: Mary Lattimore

with one comment

Interview with Mary Lattimore.

“I really love to improvise, at this point, and feel like there is a lot of untapped potential weirdness and beauty that my harp has in it. It’ll take time and playing more and messing around with more pedals, so it’s exciting to be not totally comfortable and satisfied. It’s fun to try to evoke these moods and colors through playing and I wanna get dark with it, and then probably light again.”

—Mary Lattimore

Illustration: Craig Carry, Words: Mark Carry

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‘The Withdrawing Room’ is the debut solo album of Philadelphia harpist, Mary Lattimore. Released earlier this year – limited to three hundred copies on black vinyl – the album draws from the worlds of drone, ambient, folk and world music, creating in turn a gleaming treasure of sacred sonic tapestries. Lattimore’s harp compositions can be compared with Julianna Barwick’s choral-based harmonies, where both artists loop their chosen instrument to magnificent effect. Much like Barwick’s ‘The Magic Place’, I have found myself revisiting Lattimore’s solo work on endless occasions, during the early morning hours and the quiet still of night. ‘The Withdrawing Room’ is a place to seek solace. A hidden realm is tapped into by Lattimore; evoking the cosmic spirit of Alice Coltrane’s ‘Journey In Satchidananda’ where the cascading notes envelop a myriad of feelings. The music is pure and sacred, just like the beautiful album artwork that graces ‘The Withdrawing Room’. The gorgeous artwork is by Becky Suss, and is entitled ’76 Meadow Woods Road’ (oil on linen). Be removed. Come wander deep inside the stunning harp song-cycles, where you indeed become withdrawn from the world outside your window, and transported to an entire ‘other’ place.

At the heart of ‘The Withdrawing Room’ is a beautiful collaboration between like-minded souls – Lattimore, armed with her beloved harp and line 6 looper; and Jeff Zeigler who recorded and mixed the album, as well as playing synthesizer on opening 24-minute piece ‘You’ll Be Fiiinnne’. The music is largely improvized and amazingly, the recording took merely one afternoon to complete. The song ‘You’ll Be Fiiinnne’ is simply breathtaking. The experimental and digital wizardry of Zeigler blends effortlessly with Lattimore’s rich acoustic sounds of clean harp notes and shape-shifting tones. The result is something enchanting, otherworldly, and utterly unique. The track conjures up the sound of Rodion G.A. – an artist I have only recently discovered these past few months – whose primitive makeshift set-up of early drum machines, Tesla reel to reels, and live instruments reveals a sacred treasure that has been unheard and unreleased for over thirty years. ‘The Withdrawing Room’ similarly inhabits a certain space and time that is ultimately something transcendental. As Lattimore has said of the recording session: “We slipped into a different zone.”

Lattimore has long been synonymous with the independent music scene, long before the arrival of her solo full-length player. Previous collaborations have included luminaries such as Thurston Moore, Meg Baird, Kurt Vile, Ed Askew, Fursaxa, and Jarvis Cocker. I feel the folk song tradition is embedded throughout the stunning piece, ‘Pluto The Planet’, which follows the blissful – near-mythical – sound clouds of ‘You’ll Be Fiiinne’. Across sixteen minutes, bewitching arpeggios of harp chords resonate deeply into one’s consciousness. The slow and resonating tones float in the air’s atmosphere that becalms all that surrounds you. A cathartic effect radiates from the ambient tour de force. Some time later – what feels a lifetime – the harp sounds slowly meanders to a state of completion. The river below has found its sea. The skies above have formed a perfect blue. The closing gem, ‘Poor Daniel’ feels like a lullaby to safely guide you to sleep. The meditative tones serves as a remedy to soothe all of life’s pain and troubles.

File alongside Virginia Astley’s ‘From Gardens Where We Feel Secure’, Julianna Barwick’s ‘The Magic Place’ and all records pure and divine. ‘The Withdrawing Room’ never ceases to amaze.

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‘The Withdrawing Room’ is out now on Desire Path Recordings.

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Interview with Mary Lattimore.

Congratulations on your truly inspiring debut work, ‘The Withdrawing Room’. Your harp compositions are steeped in gorgeous beauty that transports you to a whole new dimension. A work of true art and beauty. I would love for you to discuss please the recording of this album?

Thank you so much, Mark. I appreciate the lovely compliment. The recording of it was pretty simple and just took an afternoon. I brought my harp over to Jeff’s studio (Uniform Recording) and just improvised for a few hours. Nothing was really sketched out and it was very casual. I think we had some champagne. It was last year at the end of winter. I think we slipped into a different zone, too, while we were working on it. We definitely lost track of time and the songs came out pretty long!

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My current favourite is ‘You’ll Be Fiiinnne’. I love how the subtle electronics by Jeff Zeigler blend so effortlessly with your harp sounds. The piece is utterly transcendent–all 24 minutes. There is this ebb and flow to the piece that feels so natural, like the air you breathe. Please discuss this song and the collaborative aspect of making music that you and Jeff tap into so wonderfully?

Oh, awesome. That one was the first one we worked on. Jeff has recorded a lot of friends and is known around here for having a great ear and a great musical brain, so I’m grateful that he agreed to play because he really enhanced this song and made it more interesting. One of my favorite parts is when I’m taking this 9 volt battery and scraping the low wire strings creepily and he is matching that sound and playing off of it. These days, Jeff and I play shows together and have gotten to the point where we both feel creative and conversational when improvising. Feels like it’s only getting better. We’re good friends.

I think, as far as the ebb and flow goes, the arc of the song, I see it like a little narrative, like a story where things get hectic and disturbed and then come back around and all’s okay. Jeff was ready to take it there with me, so I think I found the perfect person to work with.

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Please take me back to your earliest memories of playing the harp? When did you start playing this instrument and what is it about the harp that gravitated you towards it?

My mom is a harpist, so I’ve been around them my whole life. My earliest memory of playing, I guess, was in my first lesson when I was 11. I wasn’t fully into it until later, though, because I’d get frustrated and bored and feel lame. My teacher in high school was really wonderful, though, and encouraging and I went to a couple of summer music camps where I met some cool friends that were really into being part of orchestras. It was a lucky foundation to be given, the lessons and I also went to music conservatory, so having that training is something I don’t take for granted. But I only started to really feel connected with the harp after I got to know it better, after a few years of practicing it. It took awhile for it to sink in that it was really my thing.

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While listening to your music, I feel the same spell is cast upon me that Julianna Barwick’s album ‘The Magic Place’ renders. So many layers of enchanting sounds create this mesmerising tapestry of sound. Is this a record you are familiar with? (I’m sure it is!) If so, please discuss why you love her music?

I love that record! I actually wrote her a fan email. Haha. Cool compliment!! I like the idea of a one-woman choir and focused, happy solitude, painting a mood by yourself in a room. I really like those Grouper records, too, so much. Would love to see them both play live.

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Discuss the possibilities that improvisation brings in your music?

I really love to improvise, at this point, and feel like there is a lot of untapped potential weirdness and beauty that my harp has in it. It’ll take time and playing more and messing around with more pedals, so it’s exciting to be not totally comfortable and satisfied. It’s fun to try to evoke these moods and colors through playing and I wanna get dark with it, and then probably light again.

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What albums or artists have inspired you the most in your music?

I’m really inspired by friends and people I’ve played with – Fursaxa (Tara Burke), Helena Espvall, a great cellist, Meg Baird my best pal, Samara Lubelski, who’s like a sister. They all have beautiful, elegant records, both with other people and solo. I love this piece by Gorecki, the 3rd Symphony. I love Brian Eno and the Cure, Om, Blues Control, and Growing’s earlier records. Getting to know Thurston M. and Kim G. and seeing how they play music, totally unencumbered by dumb self-doubt, just totally free, has been really inspiring. Can’t wait for Watery Love’s new record. My old roommate Daniel Bachman is great at the guitar and would play all the time, a testament to practicing and working hard by yourself. Close friends from Rochester, Andy Gilmore and Jason Schulmerich, sit alone and draw and what comes out is detailed, sometimes-strange, perfect art. Lots of creative people close to my heart.

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The artwork by Becky Suss beautifully encapsulates the music wrapped inside. The vinyl is a work of art. It must be a wonderful feeling for you when you see your work being represented by artwork such as this? A celebration of the awe-inspiring music you have created.

Becky is sooo talented. It IS a wonderful feeling! I can’t believe she let me use her painting. She later told me that the room in it is actually her grandfather’s living room and he’d just passed away when she painted it, so there’s that loss there, but the trees outside seem to be so comforting, along with all of his collection. I imagine that the room smells like old books and a Frank Lloyd Wright cool glass, dark wood smell. The painting is actually huge, gigantic.

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You have collaborated with many indie-rock greats such as Thurston Moore and Kurt Vile to name but a few. How does the collaborative side of your work feed into your own music?

I think writing harp parts that have a complementary melody is really fun, fitting together the instruments like puzzle pieces. Just focusing on melody and creating a line and I think that carries over to what I’m trying to do solo, to always indulge the ghost of a melody even when its hidden in noise.

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What is next for you, Mary? I hope you come play in Ireland sometime soon?

I would love to play in Ireland. I love Ireland so much. It’s the prettiest. Would love to see more of it and to travel all around and see the coast.

Next, I’m playing a couple of shows around here with Jeff, one at a contemporary art museum. I got asked to score a silent film in Marfa, Texas in the distant future (December), so stoked on that. Jeff and I will work on a duo record this year. Playing keyboard with this new band Mild Time. A good friend Rosali and I are jamming in June and our band’s called Ghost Ship. Her voice is gorgeous. Should be a good year!

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‘The Withdrawing Room’ is out now on Desire Path Recordings. The limited edition vinyl can be ordered here. 

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http://marylattimore.net
http://www.desirepathrecordings.com

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Written by admin

September 13, 2013 at 12:37 pm