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Step Right Up: Martyn Heyne

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“…recording doesn’t capture music; recording creates a recording.”

—Martyn Heyne

Words: Mark Carry

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Transcendence fills the space of Hamburg-born Martyn Heyne’s singular guitar-based compositions. The remarkable debut solo album ‘Electric Intervals’ – and follow-up to 2016’s achingly beautiful mini-album ‘Shady & Light’ – gently unleashes a hypnotic spell with each swirling ambient pulse and divine tones of piano and guitar.

Glorious album opener – and lead single – ‘Carry’ orbits the ether of faded dreams as sublime electric guitar soundscapes reverberate the human heart. Only mere moments into the German composer’s full-length, it is as if we are plunged into an ‘in between’ state, somehow capturing the quiet bliss of this universe that surrounds us. As the title suggests, Heyne’s echo drenched guitar tones transport you to the furthest reaches of one’s inner self, feeling beautifully lost in the pools of your mind.

Dawn light gradually fades in throughout the windswept beauty of sparse piano lament ‘Luxury’. The reflective piano notes unfolds a deeply immersive experience. The striking intimacy of ‘Patina’ with its magical tapestry of electric guitar tones radiates a shimmering warmth, particularly on the piece’s heavenly rise. ‘Faro’s soft beat and drifting guitar patterns serves one of the album’s defining moments. Magical guitar lines that belong at once to age-old folk song cycles or future post- classical overtures. The lyrical quality of a guitar melody such as this illustrates just how unique the sound world captured on ‘Electric Intervals’ truly is.

A Piano Day highlight from last year, ‘2400’ is built upon joyously uplifting piano motifs that meld together effortlessly, emitting a catharsis within the ambient swells. The album’s mystical centrepiece. The dynamics change on the luminescent beats of ‘Come On’ with a seductive guitar groove that inhabits a minimal wave sphere of enchanting sounds. Heavenly sustained piano chords of ‘Wilde Wide’ navigates the human space before the epic album closer ‘Curium’ dazzles with a flurry of delay, drum machines and invigorating guitar lines. The horizon is upon us.

Electric Intervals’ is a truly remarkable debut album from a gifted composer whose musical path is only just beginning.

‘Electric Intervals’ is out now on 7K! Records.

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Interview with Martyn Heyne.

 

Congratulations on your debut solo album ‘Electric Intervals’; it’s a very special experience. I’d love for you to go back to the making of the album itself? In line with the gorgeous debut ‘Shady & Light’, some of these songs were probably in your head for a long time?

Martyn Heyne: It is true that the ‘Shady & Light’ material and this material overlap a little bit in time, like some of the pieces on this one like ‘Faro’ and ‘Afar’ I’ve been playing them in concerts for a very long time and some are totally new like ‘Carry’ and ‘Come On’. And it’s just a mix of what I’ve gotten around to producing or what I wanted to make fresh. So in a way, I always have a big bucket of stuff that’s either an idea or it’s composed or I have some recordings and when I wanted to make the record I just started producing some things and making recordings of things I had. At the end, you look at the lot and think well, I love this composition but I don’t think it came out right so I don’t use that one or other stuff where you feel like I always thought this was never going to make it but now when it’s compared to everything, it fits just right in so I’ll pick that one.

And it’s quite surprising what takes and what compositions eventually I thought fitting for the record. Like for example this piece ‘Wilde Wide’ is one where I got up one morning – like often when I have the time after I get up I just play the piano for a little bit, just to have the first thing in the day to put you on track for the day – and that’s one of those things, I never really thought anything about it because there’s barely any musical content or anything in that piece but somehow it always remained something that I can relate to and that fits the narrative of the album very well (like at a certain position where it is now). I just watch myself from the outside a little bit when I decide what goes on the album and what I sequence so there’s a mix of stuff that’s maybe eight years old compositionally and stuff that was brand new at the time (like just made for this album).

I love how the piano pieces are interspersed among the guitar instrumentals. It works very well and as you say, the placing of certain pieces really compliment each other too or the contrasts to one another too.

MH: Well thank you. I guess I don’t really make any distinction between the piano or the guitar pieces, it’s just going from vibes, like the track ‘Carry’ is very long and then it’s nice to have something short afterwards and so forth. I think it’s easy to simplify why you do things when you try to explain the length or the instrument (or whatever), I just look at it and see and try to find a narrative so that it feels nice to listen through the whole thing as an album. It’s very much sequenced just as an album rather than a collection of pieces.

With the whole production element and your home studio and being involved with so many great records, would you have certain philosophies or your approach to sound as a whole?

MH: What I thought was interesting with this album, looking back is I didn’t really set out to make an album and then thought I’m going to write some pieces for it and then I’m going to produce them in such and such a way and so forth; I didn’t really have a master plan for it from that perspective at all. But rather, like I said I looked a little bit into the bucket of music that was there and developed some things and then saw what came out of it. And surprisingly to me, a lot of these pieces that end up on the album are recorded to cassette tape – most of them – and in a pretty lo-fi sound almost which is really OK for electric guitar and drum machines because they are not particularly fussy instruments to start with (they’re not very pristine, an electric guitar is not a harp). I’m surprised when I read reviews like it’s this pristine sound and very much figured out and people have different ideas about what eventually comes out of the sound but it rather just happens. Like the second song ‘Luxury’ I just read that it has beats or something but it’s just a piano take and it’s one microphone and that’s all there is and it’s just recorded to a really lousy mono joop recorder, you know that made it sound that way and I liked it and I kept it that way. Like I said, I probably tried to re-record it in a pristine and nice way but then eventually somehow this take was the one that I liked best. And a lot of the pieces are like that.

Also, for example the last track ‘Curium’ – the very long one – is always recorded on cassette tape, all running live through a mixing desk so I had the drum machine set up and I play them next to playing the guitar (so every once in a while I would just reach over and like add a snare drum or change the beat a little or put a delay with it or something) and play the guitar next to it. And all the beats, it had six tape echoes running and amplifiers for the guitar and drum machines and just everything went to a board and the reverb’s running and the whole thing of balancing and juggling it live, it just goes into a cassette tape recorder [laughs]. And then this two-track cassette tape (that’s what I used for the whole production) so then I put that into the computer and I edited it down a little bit because it was even longer when I made it. And then I took this down edit into a church and played it back there to record more reverb and make it more pristine and I overdubbed the rhodes on it. It’s almost anti-production in a way. I certainly wasn’t looking for the pristine sound or for the best way to do it but somehow these versions are the ones that were to me the most convincing. I know for example from ‘Curium’ doing like a proper studio production where everything sounds proper and it just couldn’t beat this one somehow and that’s how it goes sometimes.

And maybe also interestingly with the first track ‘Carry’ that’s also just one electric guitar so it’s just a guitar and there’s an echo (and that’s all that’s playing). But I think I must have recorded about a hundred takes of it over a period of about half a year and I just recorded it over and over again, mostly to a quarter-inch tape machine with the reverb and everything going. At the end of that time, I just picked my favourite version so the arrangement changed and the sound changed and it was different every time. So, instead of recording it once or three times and then just working on that sound, I just recorded it over and over again – they were all different – and then I just took one at the end that I liked the best. It’s not my philosophy but that’s how this album happened.

I love how ‘Curium’ has that live performance feel where you feel like you’re in the room as you listen to it.

MH: There is just a bunch of delay pedals that run after the drum machine and this electro part in the middle is just playing with delay machines and making it crazy. And again, I think the original version must have been something like twenty-five minutes so I cut out a huge guitar solo and probably some of the delay dubbing but it’s all from that one performance (it’s not from several takes). The craziness and the distortion and the congruence of it somehow at the end won over [laughs] the technical perfections that are clearly there.

I’m always fascinated when a musician has so many takes – and as you say how each one is different – would you feel a certain fear or anxiety that you are going to pick the right one in the sense that you have so many moments to choose from?

MH: That’s an interesting point that you mention because that is actually something that is part of my recording philosophy or maybe something that I learned about recording that is always very difficult to pass onto the people who I work with especially when they are working on like their first or second album when they have little experience is that people tend to finish a record and after they are done, there’s a few aspects of it that they don’t really like or they wish that they could change. And this is inevitable in a way, this is one of the things that is inherent in recording because I think this is one of the things that many people don’t understand about recording: recording doesn’t capture music, recording creates a recording. If I had a piece of music (like a composition) and I play it for you now ; it’s sunshine and it’s the afternoon and I’ll play it in a certain way. And if I played it to you at one o’ clock in the night chances are I’ll play it in a slower tempo, maybe with a different timbre and if I played it to you at seven in the morning it would again be different. If it’s the summertime I would play it different and if it’s the wintertime I would play it different, you know what I mean. So, things make sense differently in different circumstances. If you play it in front of fifty people you’ll play it in a more intimate fashion than if you play it in front of five thousand and so forth.

Therefore, when you listen to music or when you perform music or when music is just music, this stuff always just falls into place by itself because it is part of how the performer feels and part of how the audience feels just by itself so they don’t really recognize that they are making these choices. But then in a recording these things are trapped, the microphone is the point where this stuff gets lost. So, it’s simply impossible to pick the right tempo for a recording or to pick the right mood for a recording, rather I advise people to say to find a moment in your life when you’re not too drunk or you’re not too tired and not too angry – or maybe completely tired, drunk and angry – and then you make a decision of the moment that you are convinced that it is a good decision and that is your recording, regardless of what you record later on, in a different day time, in a different mindset, you will want to change things, always forever (that’s just how it is). That doesn’t mean that in the later stage you’re smarter than before or more musical or you have a better view on it, it simply doesn’t mean that, it’s just one of the shortcomings of recording. Recording is not a recording of music; it is a recording. It’s a different animal and therefore this feeling of not having captured everything that the song means to a listener or a performer is inevitable and everybody with every production has to live with this. But this is very difficult to tell people and it’s often the reason why once a mix or a master is done people will call you up every day and want minute changes, hoping to chase this little thing that they want to get perfect, which is simply not possible. So, I love the take that is the take, I play it different now but that’s what it is.

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One of my favourite pieces is ‘Faro’ with its beautiful melody but also how the rise comes in, and the way it’s melded with a soft beat as well.

MH: Again with that one, this is a take that I recorded I think in 2013 really shortly between Efterklang tours so I was just home for a few days and I had this piece that I’ve been already performing in 2012 when I was touring with Nils Frahm I played this piece. And then for the first time in between these tour breaks I played it on electric guitar and I thought this sounds crazy, this is cool so I just quickly recorded a demo take of it to remember what it sounds like on an electric guitar so then I would remember that is an option with this piece. And then later for this record I tried to produce it and make a ton of recordings of it and none of them sounded like this one (so I kept this one). It’s the same story basically. So, this is the original demo of it.

What are your memories of music as you were growing up or even at point did you start recording like that first moment when you discovered recording sounds yourself?I presume you started playing the guitar and piano from a young age?

MH: To be honest I played for much longer than I started to record. I only started to record like for fun when I was fourteen or something (I didn’t really do that before). By that time I had already played for much much longer so that came as a second idea and maybe that’s also what shapes my views so much on it that a recording is not a recording of what happens when you play but it is the production of something else entirely. And when you start out with cassette tape – and as I did also by the way with the Atari computer – then it’s much more obvious that what you capture is something very different and you start to play with that. You see like if I put this in this is what comes out so if I change what I put in, regardless of how that sounds, what comes out? What is it that then comes out? I think I was always very aware that they are different animals.

The guitar itself and the sounds you create it has a whole world of sound that you are able to create with this instrument. I can imagine there’s been different sorts of experiments that are ongoing with you and the guitar?

MH: Absolutely, I think that the guitar is in an unusual position among instruments in that it came very late. I’m talking about electric and electric sounds now although it’s not much difficult with classical because that’s not much older and it has a similar problem (but slightly different). The electric guitar came about in the 50’s and then there’s 60’s and 70’s rock and it kind of stops. Even today, a lot of people when they play the guitar they learn that music that’s been played in that time and try to recreate that sound that’s been done in that time. And similarly on classical guitar people play Villa_Lobos or Bach and try to do it in the sound of these handful – and really a handful – of guitarists that popularised the original classical guitar sound. I don’t know, I feel like the attempt to move it away from that are not too many or not too successful in comparison to I find much broader scope of other instruments. I don’t know if that’s the reason but I could imagine the reason is that it’s simply a pretty recent, pretty young thing, you know and it just doesn’t have the same kind of history as orchestral music or keyboard-based music or vocal music. For me it’s always been a very odd aspect of composing and playing and find sounds that are really exciting and it’s great to crank up a loud amplifier and play a Led Zeppelin riff but it doesn’t provide any of the electricity to me that I get when I find a sound that I feel a personal connection with becauseit’s coming from my own world.

Your voice is heard in so many great records of so many people’s music. You have worked with many musicians on different albums, I wonder how does the collaborative process work for you?

MH: I work with many people but I wouldn’t say I collaborate. I have to say there’s barely any collaboration going on. Most of the time I work to facilitate their music. When I work in my studio with other people it’s mostly about seeing what they want to achieve and hearing what they want to achieve and seeing what they have done and helping them to move that further to a more finished place basically. In that capacity, that’s different from a collaboration where I would at some point say no but I want it like this, let’s go there and that’s sometimes not so clear for people to see maybe where the cut-off is between what I do as a studio job with my studio and my own music. For my own stuff basically so far you can only get these two albums. Of course in Efterklang I was also pretty much left to my own devices as to what I do with the music and stuff but that’s different. Studio work for me is really studio work. I am very honoured and happy that many people come to the studio because they like sounds of what they’ve heard or stuff that I have made and they say like ‘oh can you make it sound a little bit like that?’ or ‘how did you get that sound?’ or we come with such and such with certain reference. That’s the only reason why people come I guess, I only get requests based on other work that I’ve done before basically. But still I don’t  interfere with what they’re trying to do, I just try to give them some of what they’re looking for if I can. And for that reason also sometimes I get requests for studio stuff where people ask for something and I don’t think I can give them or I just have no clue what they’re on about [laughs] and I just say sorry I can’t help you there.

You have a big European tour coming up. This must be exciting to see how the songs change and mutate depending on location and time and different things like that? And also how these songs off the latest album are translated to the live setting?

MH: Absolutely, I’m curious to find out about that too. I’m very happy on this tour that Balmorhea are taking me with them and I’m opening for them every night and they are a great band, I’m sure you know that because I think that they play for an audience who could be interested in the general field of music that I’m also involved with and their last record ‘Clear Language’ is really fantastic so I’m looking very much forward to that tour. It’s four weeks of shows. Playing shows for me is one of the best things of the whole job you know. I think it’s almost a bit underrated how important concerts are for this kind of music and I’m very happy to be able to do some. I will play some from ‘Electric Intervals’ of course and also from ‘Shady & Light’ and also some new things and so I think it will be a good mix and we’ll see how some of them will change over the course of the tour.The last concert fortunately is in Berlin so at the moment that it is most mixed up it is nice to do a home show at the very end.

In contrast to playing as a duo or in groups, playing solo must be like a completely different beast?

MH: Performing solo is very different from playing with a group, it has advantages and disadvantages. The great thing is that you can change direction on the go whenever you feel like it and you can switch the set-list around, you can play songs longer and shorter, you can change the mood and the vibe and take a turn at any point. And it’s also not too complicated a set-up so that is all great. Sometimes it’s a little less fun because if you go onstage with a band you have these moments where you can just sit back and watch what people are doing; what the other people in the band are doing and the audience and you can take a little bit of a break whereas as a solo performer you are always the thing, the entire time, you have to stay on the ball much more. From that perspective it can be a lot of fun to play with a band too and you share a bit more but luckily in this case I am also touring with Balmorhea the whole time so they are six people and then we’ll have a great team for technical side of things so I think it will be much more fun altogether than if I was actually on my own (which I will be only on the stage).

Are there certain albums you’ve been listening to a lot lately?

MH: The Bill Callahan ‘Apocalypse’ record. I started listening to it when it came out maybe four years ago and it just gets better, I really like that one. And also recently I very much enjoyed listening – maybe because it’s winter – to Wagner opera overtures. I’m not so into the singing bits but the orchestral beginnings I think it’s really worthwhile to give that a spin as well.

‘Electric Intervals’ is out now on 7K! Records.

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March 20, 2018 at 3:48 pm

Track Premiere: We Like We ‘Someone told me I was Paradise for you’

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We are delighted to premiere the new single  ‘Someone told me I was Paradise for you’ from the gifted Copenhagen-based quartet We Like We. The gorgeous new sonic creation is the first material since the band’s critically acclaimed debut album ‘A New Age of Sensibility’ (released in late 2014). The highly anticipated single is released tomorrow, 1st September 2016.

Single Cover Forside

Copenhagen-based quartet We Like We comprise the gifted talents of Katrine Grarup Elbo (violin) Josefine Opsahl (cello) Sara Nigard Rosendal (percussion) and Katinka Fogh Vindelev (voice). All four members are classically trained, but each share a desire for exploring, experimenting and shaping a unique sound of their own, as reflected in their diverse musical influences. The group’s first live performance took place at FROST festival in Copenhagen in February 2013: a unique double-bill concert with Efterklang. We Like We have collaborated with an array of musicians and projects in the past: Efterklang; Julia Holter; Mew; Sofia Gubaidulina; The Danish National Symphony Orchestra, to name but a few. We Like We’s debut album ‘A New Age of Sensibility’ is available now on The Being Music.

 

“This single is one of the results of our work over the past six months. We have had a close collaboration with sound engineer Marc Casanovas (NorCat Lyd) with whom we have explored sound, space and different ways of recording”.

—We Like We

Someone told me I was paradise for you is the endless mantra that is whispered in to your ear during the late hours of a dark blue summer night. It is four individual voices and reflections braided together as a unit in the depths of the collective unconsciousness.

From the opening dream-like pulses of delicate percussion – beginning with two gongs before soft ripples of vibraphone effortlessly melds together – We Like We’s brand new recording invites the listener deep into a labyrinth of fragile beauty and encapsulating dreams. The ambient works of Harold Budd lies somewhere in the ether of these burning flames, wherein a tenderness and stillness of night radiates with each and every meditative heart-beat. Soon, achingly beautiful instrumentation of violin is carefully added, evoking the glimmering rays of hope across cascading skies: dapples of light flicker along the horizon. The modern-classical soundscapes and divine instrumentation conjures up the timeless sound of the prestigious Touch or Type labels with the spirit of Peter Broderick, Sylvain Chauveau and Hildur Guðnadóttir

At the half-way point, the mesmerising voice of Katinka Fogh Vindelev whispers directly to one’s mind’s eye. Like a bird in full-flight, these four combined elements of strings, voice and percussion soars majestically with unlimited possibilities of discovery, exploration and chance. The mantra-like phrases sung by Vindelev transports the listener to the poignant, dream-like fantasies of Kazuo Ishiguro’s master novels or the otherworldly realm crafted by Kafka. This sublime tapestry of gradual blissed-out tones reveals inner-most truths and awakens a myriad of feelings and emotion. The compelling, ambitious and sublime new single is nestled nicely amidst the avant-garde, modern-classical and luminaries such as Scott Walker (‘Tilt’ era) and L.A’s Julia Holter and ‘Parallelograms’-era Linda Perhacs.

Released on The Being Music 2016, www.thebeingmusic.com

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Track Premiere: Martyn Heyne (Efterklang)

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In my mind a composition is never finished because nothing keeps me from playing it differently next time.

Martyn Heyne

 

 

Shady & Light’ is the debut solo release from renowned German musician Martyn Heyne. Born in Hamburg, the Berlin-based composer studied at Holland’s Conservatorium van Amsterdam. His home studio, Lichte – based next to Berlin’s Tempelhof (former) airport has been the chosen recording space for artists including The National, Nils Frahm, Lubomyr Melnyk, Peter Broderick and Efterklang. In addition, Heyne was a touring member with Danish group Efterklang during their 2013 ‘Piramida’ tour (and parts of their final album was worked on in Lichte).

The album opener ‘Telepath’ flickers with golden dawn’s glistening rays as soothing guitar tones meld effortlessly with luminous beats, conjuring up the timeless sound of Finnish duo The Gentleman Losers and Keith Kenniff’s Helios project. The master composer crafts such singular melodies with meticulous detail buried deep within the sonic terrain of ambient-infused-modern classical flourishes. The sparse lament of ‘Sparks’ proves another defining moment, in which radiant waves of nostalgia seeps into the forefront of the mix. ‘Sparks’ belongs in a stratosphere whose axis points between Keith Jarrett’s live solo recordings and the collaborative works of Tape & Bill Wells.

A glorious rise of ambient flourishes permeates the krautrock-tinged ‘Brandung’ with scintillating synthesizer passages and meditative electric guitar pulses. ‘The Gathering’ – despite its short length – exudes a wall of emotion that echoes the ambient works of Harold Budd with pristine reverberated guitar tones fading onto the sun-lit horizon. The album’s towering penultimate track ‘Monoment’ somehow transposes Nils Frahm’s piano to the guitar instrument: the transcendent sound world of synthesizers, drum machines and guitar fuse together, evoking the ‘Spaces’ live document of Heyne’s close colleague.

Shady & Light’ will be exclusively available from martynheyne.com from 27th May 2016.

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Interview with Martyn Heyne.

Congratulations on the truly gorgeous debut mini album, ‘Shady & Light’. I would love to gain an insight into your compositional approach when creating these intricately beautiful guitar-based pieces? 

Martyn Heyne: Thank you very much! As you say, each piece is centred around a single electric guitar performance – that’s my compositional frame work. From there I add all the other things because I love sounds and finding spaces for them! I tend to have the musical idea in the master take and then base the arrangement on sonics. The instrumentation is often part of the Mix too. For example, when high frequencies are lacking I might add a cymbal rather than use EQ.

Your sonic canvas of guitar, synthesizers and a drum machine is a joy to savour. In terms of the instrumentation, would many of these tracks originate from a guitar-based improvisation? As this is a debut solo EP –although of course you have a significant body of work behind you among the many wonderful and diverse collaborative projects in the past– do these musical compositions all originate from the same space in time?

MH: Yes, the compositions are usually distilled improvisations on guitar or piano. Even when I start on one instrument I will bounce over to the other for a moment just to see what that might say about the music. In my mind a composition is never finished because nothing keeps me from playing it differently next time. I try to listen to where it wants to go until I have a real favourite route through the music. So yes, the simmering nudges details into place. 

Can you please recount your memories of composing ‘Sparks’, Martyn? This is the piece we are honoured to premiere on our site. The delicacy of the piece immediately strikes you and indeed the gracefulness of this divine sonic canvas that gradually unfolds.

MH: Thank you very much! With this track I applied the approach of my classical studies to the electric guitar. I love how a more classical technique allows the guitar to be like a vibraphone or any keyboard instrument. Chord and melody, notes attacking at the same time (as opposed to strummed), countering bass lines – those are the gaps I’m forever trying to bridge. By the way, the original title of this one was the smell of campfire in our sweaters.

The Lichte studio is steeped in history with such an inspiring array of musicians and close collaborators of yours all recording here over the years. I would love for you to discuss this particular space, Martyn and explain the reasons as to why (or perhaps how!) the acoustics and sound world captured in these walls are so special? Please talk me through the studio techniques you have developed and processes you favour when it comes to making/recording music in the Lichte studio?

MH: One thing I can think of is that the studio is very informal, as it’s located in my flat, and maybe more neat and calm than studios generally are. Many of the common recording pressures don’t apply to a session here which can make all the difference. My main focus is always on performance and content because they translate most through all kinds of listening environments. I am surprised how often people sing into a 10k microphone with a crackling distorted Behringer headphone sound. It brings uneasiness to the performance. In my philosophy the monitoring situation is just as important as the recording chain because the take will shine through more than the mic.

My current favourite is the penultimate track, ‘Monoment’. As the sound world of synthesizers and guitar meld effortlessly together, I feel a perfect symmetry exists alongside the works of Nils Frahm, (more particularly your guitar becomes a mirror of Nils’s piano, creating such moving and enveloping sounds!) I also love the sequencing of ‘Shady & Light’, where the more synth/drum machines come to the fore during the final section after beginning with fragile and barer guitar instrumentation.

MH: Thank you so much! In ‘Monoment’ I operate the drum machine in between playing the guitar, which allows me to change the arrangement on the go in a live performance. On top of that I use automation software to create what I call Random Auto Dub (yes, that’s RAD) which sends the drum machine signal kind of randomly into a spring reverb, amp, or tape delays. That way it always does things I don’t expect and I have something to react to on stage which makes the whole thing way more exciting for me!

My friend Anne Braun shot a great video of a concert where you can see how that works (https://youtu.be/AIQ1K537enM). Incidentally, the title Monoment is based on the track being recorded, just like almost all of Shady & Light, in mono.

Your life is steeped in music. Please take me back to your earliest musical memories? What defining moments occurred during your musical upbringing that you feel helped carve out this particular musical path for you, Martyn? Also, please mention any records that provided huge inspiration for you, over the years?

MH: As a young child I just experimented on my mother’s piano using two chromatic modes, symmetrically based around the Ab or the D. When I eventually got lessons, C major came as a real surprise! 

I was lucky to be born in the time where people started buying CD’s, so vinyl and record players were up for grabs and became kids’ toys. I got to play the obsolete space wasters in my room while everyone was busy trying to get their cherished CD’s out of the plastic wrapper! That way I had a record collection all my life, and it still includes my parents’ original Beatles red and blue albums as well as Abbey Road which is possibly my most played record. Other favourites include:

Miles Davis and Portishead. Both masters at getting such direct beauty out of things that are pretty rough around the edges. Also both masters of the band concept and especially the drums in it! 

The Gentleman Losers, the first album. Their sonic vision makes me so happy! My favourite record for after sundown. 

Oasis, Definitely Maybe. The beginning of my lifelong obsession with tape delays, compression and distortion. Unfortunately, the sound of this record also probably started the loudness war because so many that came after didn’t understand that it only works the first time. 

Keith Jarrett, Vienna Concert. This, even more than other solo concerts of him, shows where you can go musically when you go alone. The mobility of it makes it so enticing to me!

Richard Wagner, all the overtures. I imagine, after Paul McCartney walks offstage another 80k capacity stadium, shakes the President’s hand and makes for his limo through a vast sea of picture taking admirers and he’s beginning to worry it might all go to his head a bit – then all it takes is for him to go home and quietly listen through the opening of Lohengrin to firmly place his feet back on the ground. 

Lastly, if you’re DJing at a party, forget all of what I just said and put on Solange’s True EP!

Shady & Light’ will be exclusively available from martynheyne.com from 27th May 2016.

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May 17, 2016 at 5:37 pm

Step Right Up: Heather Woods Broderick

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Interview with Heather Woods Broderick.

“Many times I see things, whether it’s a passing scene out of a window, or a combination of colours on a wall, that conjure up memories for me. So sometimes I use these images to help depict or frame a feeling.”

— Heather Woods Broderick

Words: Mark Carry

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Glider’ is the highly anticipated sophomore full-length –and follow-up to the formidable 2009 solo debut ‘From The Ground’ – from gifted multi-instrumentalist and singer-songwriter, Heather Woods Broderick. The Brooklyn-based and Portland-raised musician has long been synonymous with some of the most breath-taking musical explorations of recent times, having closely collaborated with Portand’s Horse Feathers, Danish group Efterklang and is currently an integral member in U.S singer-songwriter Sharon Van Etten’s band.

The nine immaculate sonic creations captured on ‘Glider’ unfolds a fragile beauty and striking emotional depth that inhabits an ethereal dimension from the opening dream-like atmosphere of ‘Up In The Pine’ to the closing country gem ‘All For A Love’. ‘Glider’s bewitching sonic canvas possesses a transient quality with each song cycle capturing a myriad of fleeting moments. The gorgeous vocal harmonies, pristine production and rich instrumentation serves the fitting backdrop for Broderick’s deeply affecting songs to flourish. For example, ‘Mama Shelter’ evolves into an infectious dub-infused groove which is masterfully inter-woven with Broderick’s richly soulful vocal delivery. The piano-based ballads of ‘Fall Hard’ (which could be taken from Marissa Nadler’s latest record ‘July’), ‘The Sentiments’ and the album’s title-rack ‘Glider’ serve the album’s most poignant and soul-stirring moments as the rich tapestry of vocal harmonies and piano notes drift majestically in the ether.

A Call For Distance’ epitomises the evocative production masterfully dotted across ‘Glider’ as timeless dreamwave sounds of This Mortal Coil and Cocteau Twins comes to the fore. The joyous sounds of ‘All For A Love’ with its jazz leanings (thanks in part to David Allred’s trumpet part) contains gorgeous clean guitar tones, upbeat harmonies and warm percussion akin to a marvelous sunset on a summer’s night. “There is a lot to live for” is a lyric that resonates powerfully and marks the album’s over-arching theme of perseverance through life’s difficulties and therein the strength to find one’s inner voice.

‘Glider’ is available now on Western Vinyl.

http://heatherwoodsbroderick.com/
http://westernvinyl.com/

Interview with Heather Woods Broderick.

Congratulations on your sublime new record ‘Glider’. The album is nothing short of staggering where the nine sonic creations unfold a fragile beauty and striking emotional depth that leaves the listener utterly dumbfounded. Rather than a record being a snapshot in a moment of time, ‘Glider’ possesses a transient quality with each song cycle capturing a myriad of fleeting moments culled from a long period of time. Can you please talk me through the songs of ‘Glider’ and discuss the themes to ‘Glider’ and your aims from the outset?

Heather Woods Broderick: Thank you very much; I’m really happy to hear you’re enjoying the record. Most of the songs on ‘Glider’ are reflections of experiences I’ve had, or close friends or family have had. The songs were written over about a two-year period, but reference events spanning a substantial period of time in my life. The title track is the only song I wrote prior to moving to Brooklyn in the fall of 2011. Many years had passed since I released ‘From the Ground’ when I really began writing the material for ‘Glider’. I think I’d grown as a musician after playing with so many different projects, and also as a person after so much travel around the world. ‘From the Ground’ was my first attempt to write any songs with words, so there were a lot of things I wanted to do differently when writing ‘Glider’. I like to create an atmospheric landscape for songs to live in. For ‘Glider’, I still wanted this to play an important role in the sound of the record, but I spent more time fully forming songs and writing lyrics. I think all of the songs on the record are pretty self-explanatory in a lyrical sense since they are all based on real events and emotions, but I do like to utilize a bit of metaphor in songwriting to help paint a picture an allow for more imagination. Many times I see things, whether it’s a passing scene out of a window, or a combination of colours on a wall, that conjure up memories for me. So sometimes I use these images to help depict or frame a feeling.

The range of sounds masterfully sculpted across the record is something that sets ‘Glider’ apart from your formidable debut full-length ‘From The Ground’ where this time around all songs are vocal-based, reflecting a song-writing masterclass in full bloom. Please take me back to the recording sessions and the wonderful cast of musicians you were joined by, not least your brother Peter and the wonderful David Allred among several others.

HWB: Every song on the record started out as a poorly self-recorded demo. I knew that I wanted to go into the studio having all of the material prepared, so I spent a lot of time with the demos – working with the structure and arrangements of the songs. I had all the vocal ideas worked out on demos, and knew the guitar sounds I wanted to go for, etc. When it finally came time to go into the studio I asked a few friends to be a part of the process. I spent five days at Type Foundry studio, working with engineer Adam Selzer, in Portland, OR where I recorded all of my basic tracks and vocals, and also tracked 2 of the songs (Wyoming + All for a Love) live as a three-piece. During these sessions Dave Depper played bass, Peter Broderick played Drums, Birger Olsen came in to lay down the guitar solo on ‘All for a Love’, and Eric Early played some hammond on ‘Desert’. All phenomenal musicians; I was lucky to have them join me on the songs. After the five days at Type Foundry, Peter and I took all those tracks out to a home studio he has on the Oregon Coast called The Sparkle. We spent a couple of weeks out there doing the rest of the overdubs. David Allred also came out and added some upright bass and trumpet during this time. We worked with the songs a lot during this phase, filling out the arrangements more, doing all of the post production, and then mixing the record here as well.

Aesthetically, ‘Glider’ is such a triumph and revelation. The piano-based ballads such as the heartwrenching title-track, ‘Fall Hard’ and ‘The Sentiments’ are beautifully inter-woven with ethereal dreamwave creations like ‘A Call For Distance’ and stunning folk gems like ‘Desert’ and ‘All For A Love’. I wonder was it ever difficult to decide on a certain style or version of a particular song, Heather? Did any of these songs undergo a dramatic transformation (or mutation!) from your original sketch of a song to its final recorded entity? For example, I can imagine a song such as ‘A Call For Distance’ is such a thrill to perform and record with your band?

HWB: I find it almost impossible to go back and drastically change the structure or lyrics of a song once I’ve written it. So for the most part, the songs are really similar to the demos. I wasn’t really going for any particular style or anything when I was writing. ‘A Call for Distance’ was sort of my labour of love on the record. I used a lot of delays through the process of writing these songs, and I think this one in particular was really inspired by what I was hearing as I went. I had an electric guitar with a delay pedal, a vocal mic, and a basic logic setup, so I could play and listen back while writing. I wouldn’t even know how to replicate some of the sounds from the demos on this song, so we ended up flying in some of the demo tracks. I have yet to perform this one live with a band, but I really look forward to doing that, and figuring out some version of it that works in a band setting. Some fun developments did happen during the recording process though. For example, Dave Depper’s bass playing on ‘Mama Shelter’ ended up being a huge influence to the path of that song took. He came up with this dub/reggae bass part in the chorus’ that we loved, so we sort of played on that theme while adding the other instrumentation. It fit in really well with the chorus echo and space echo machines that we were using with all the other tracks as well.

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The art of collaboration has been a trusted constant in your musical path, from Horse Feathers to Efterklang and Sharon Van Etten. I would love for you to share your feelings on music as being the great collaborative art. I can imagine the sum of these experiences and journeys with all these special souls makes for such an inspiring and rewarding journey. What are the memories you most cherish from these particular collaborations?

HWB: I have been very lucky to play with so many talented musicians, and collaborating with other artists is something that I’ll always have an interest in doing, musically and beyond. I love learning other peoples’ songs as well as writing parts to accompany others’ music. I find a lot of pleasure in practice and repetition. It’s a very different experience playing with different people. Everyone approaches music in their own way, and I find that really interesting. I go through phases of wanting to work on music that’s much more structured or technical, and wanting to throw out all the rules and just play loud rock music. It’s all rewarding in different ways. I loved being able to play cello in Horse Feathers – something I haven’t done with any of the other bands I’ve played in since, at least in a live setting. I have particularly fond memories of traveling with Efterklang to places I’d never been, and haven’t been since. They were really special people to make music with. I was late in the game in hearing Sharon’s music, but I’m so glad I did. I still remember the first time we sat in my living room and sang together – a moment I’ll never forget.

Coming from a musical family – both your parents are musicians and you began piano lessons at the young age of eight – music has always been in your life. I would love if you could reflect on pivotal moments that occurred during your musical upbringing that you feel helped you in a significant way? I can only imagine you and your brother at home must have been playing music together, almost on a constant basis?

HWB: There was definitely a lot of music going on in my house growing up. My parents both played guitar and always spun records after dinner. My older brother Noah played saxophone and also electric in a grunge rock band. I took piano lessons for years, and then quit for about a year when I was 15 or 16. Probably typical of that age and not wanting to be told what to do. I came back around to it though. I found some classical pieces that I really fell in love with and contemporary bands that I heard classical crossover with (everything from Rachels to various math rock bands), and it made me excited to keep practicing, and to be able to apply what I’d learned to making music with people. My brother Peter started taking suzuki violin lessons when he was really young, but we never really played together until I was 18 or 19. We started playing in a band together then, and also went to the same school for a brief period and would write and perform pieces together for composition classes and recitals. My parents were always really supportive of whatever I wanted to do with music, and I’m sure their support encouraged me to go down my own musical path.

The tender lament ‘Desert’ is one of the album’s (many) defining moments. I love this sense of a travelogue that flickers in and out during many of your songs. The imagery and poetic prose
conjured up on ‘Desert’ resonates powerfully. Please talk me through this song and your memories of writing ‘Desert’.

HWB: ‘Desert’ was one of the later songs I wrote for the record. I was on a break from touring and trying to spend some quiet time at home with my guitar in Brooklyn. I wrote the song in one afternoon in my living room there. I had recently been playing a lot of music with my dear friend and fellow musician Alela Diane in support of her record ‘About Farewell’. I was playing second guitar along with her and had been messing around with some of those finger picking patterns. The core of the lyrics are based around a conversation that I’d recently had with a former boyfriend that had left me feeling unresolved. It was also late winter in New York, and the imagery is embedded in observations of the season.

I feel the empowering piano ballads contained on ‘Glider’ serve the vital pulse to this remarkable album, reminiscent of Marissa Nadler, Grouper’s ‘Ruins’ LP and indeed, Sharon Van Etten. It feels as if these songs represent some of the earliest written songs that helped shape the rest of the record. I love the ethereal dimension the piano-based works inhabit, creating in turn, utterly transcendent moments.

HWB: Those are all lovely ladies to mention, thank you. ‘Glider‘ was the earliest track written for the record, and was written while I was still living in Berlin before moving to Brooklyn. ‘The Sentiments’ was written somewhere in the middle of that two year writing period, and ‘Fall Hard’ was actually the last song I wrote for the record. Maybe it’s appropriate that they are scattered like they are throughout the record in a sense; I hadn’t thought about that.

What records do you find yourself coming back to, time and time again? Please discuss any books/gigs/music/films you have been most impressed with lately?

HWB: My musical tastes really vary. On the classic side, I always go back to records by Kate Wolf, Neil Young, and Springsteen. These are all records I grew up listening to. I don’t think I’ll ever tire of Dawn Upshaw performing Henryk Górecki’s Symphony no. 3, Rachmaninoff’s piano concerto no. 2, or any Chet Baker record. I also love a lot of new indie bands, jazz, ambient – the list could really go on forever. I think the most memorable performances I’ve seen in the last few years was Antony and the Johnson’s performing Swanlights at Radio City Music Hall. I love seeing dance performances. ‘Drift’ by Cindy Van Acker, and a piece titled ‘Leading Light’ by Suniti Dernovsek are two of my favorites I’ve seen in the last year. I recently read ‘Light Years’ by James Salter and ‘The Year of Magical Thinking’ by Joan Didion – both beautiful books. I’d highly recommend both.

 


 

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‘Glider’ is available now on Western Vinyl.

http://heatherwoodsbroderick.com/
http://westernvinyl.com/

Step Right Up: We Like We

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Interview with We Like We.

“How many times does life actually evolve as anticipated? There is something extremely beautiful about these processes and transformations.”

—Katinka Fogh Vindelev

Words: Mark Carry

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We like We is an experimental performance and sound quartet based in Copenhagen, Denmark. Encompassing worlds of neo-classical, experimental pop and avant-garde soundscapes, the highly promising and gifted quartet comprises of Katrine Grarup Elbo (violin) Josefine Opsahl (cello) Sara Nigard Rosendal (percussion) and Katinka Fogh Vindelev (voice). All four members are classically trained, but each share a desire for exploring, experimenting, jamming and shaping a sound of their own.

Expanding their inspiration and influence from the classical roots We like We makes music driven by intuition and playfulness. I feel a lovely parallel exists between the Danish quartet’s highly-evocative and intuitive compositions and Iceland’s Amiina such is the unwavering beauty and utter magic the masterful musicians create with each sacred note. Through their collaborative compositions, We like We creates music that travels beyond the grid of genres. The band’s debut album ‘A New Age of Sensibility’ contains a kaleidoscope of enchanting sounds from the rhythmic pulses of ‘Anticipation’; spellbinding intermezzi capturing moments of divine transcendence (‘Tango’ and ‘I Began To Fall Apart’) and multi-layered choral patterns interwoven with immaculate instrumentation of strings and percussion (‘The Sound Of My Own Voice’).

The group’s first live performance took place at FROST festival in Copenhagen in February 2013: a unique double-bill concert with Efterklang, playing on top of a 1400-ton heavy diesel engine. Lead singer Katinka Vindelev has toured the world with Copenhagen’s Efterklang in addition to being in the choir for U.S. luminary singer-songwriter Julia Holter. Furthermore, Vindelev’s solo project of I am now offers an invaluable insight into an incredible talent. Violinist Katrine Elbo has performed with Danish artists Rasmus Seebach, Mew and Sanne Salomonson as well as a host of others (including The Danish National Symphony Orchestra). Percussionist Sara Rosendal has been an integral part to various Danish orchestras like DRUO, DRSO and The Royal Danish Orchestra. Josefine Opsahl (cello) has worked with a wide array of composers, most lately with Russian composer Sofia Gubaidulina.

A New Age of Sensibility’ is out now on The Being Music.

http://welikewe.com/
http://thebeingmusic.bandcamp.com/

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Interview with We Like We.

Congratulations on the stunning debut album, ‘A New Age of Sensibility’. One of the striking aspects of the debut record is the sheer range of styles and musical traditions; at once it feels a beautifully realized fusion of modern-classical and pop music. Firstly, please discuss the writing process for these musical compositions? I can imagine certain pieces such as ‘The Sound of My Own Voice’ and ‘Tisina’ took quite some time to come to completion?

Sara Nigard Rosendal: Thank you for the kind words. All of our music emerges from a place of curiosity and playfulness. In the making of this album we had long jam-sessions that we recorded. We then listened to these and found some interesting themes or sounds that we tried to develop. We have worked with different dogmas in order to always expand the scale of what each of our instruments can do. None of the music is written down and there is always a touch of improvisation when we play. We like it that way, because it keeps the tracks alive.

Katinka Fogh Vindelev: This album has evolved slowly within a period of 2 years. Creating the music after getting invitations from two different progressive festivals in Copenhagen. Firstly FROST in February 2013 and later same year the experimental Wundergrund Festival. So instead of rushing into a studio, we’ve shaped and composed the music with a live concert mindset so to speak, cutting into the core of what we as a group are capable of playing and wanting to express together.

SNR:Tisina’ means Silence and was an attempt to make a track that dwells on simple phrases and sounds and then create a state of meditation. It became very clear, however, that in the deep of silence there are a few demons as well. This was not something we planned – it just happened. It was not really a hard piece to make, it just requires the right state of mind and a good sense of reacting and communication.

KFV: The Sound Of My Own Voice’ was a more complex composition yes, but as we’re always on the lookout for the essence of our ideas, it slowly revealed itself as repeating patterns slightly out of sync, each instrument representing an individual voice, explaining the title as well ‘The Sound Of My Own Voice’.

In terms of the instrumentation, there are gorgeously crafted arrangements throughout the record, for voice, strings and percussion also. I would love to gain an insight into your classically rooted backgrounds? Each member clearly brings their own unique vision to this special record and clearly, a deep connection is formed between the members. 

SNR: We are all studying at the conservatory. Josefine and Katrine (cello,violin) are currently doing their masters at the Royal Danish Academy of Music. Katinka (voice) has a BA degree in classical voice and is currently doing her Masters in Electronic Music and Sound Art alongside private singing lessons in Copenhagen and Berlin. I have a BA from the Royal Danish Academy of Music and I am currently studying my masters in the music academy in Malmö, Sweden. We are all very happy to undergo this education. It gives us a high technical level on our instruments that then provides freedom to express ourselves. Having the entire music history as a background when creating music, is extremely helpful. 

I would also love for you to recount your memories of forming We Like We? It’s fascinating (and very fitting) that your first live performance took place at a festival in Copenhagen alongside Efterklang in 2013. You all must have fond memories of this particular concert.

KFV: It took us about a year before we met Sara, so We like We was founded by Katrine [Grarup Elbo], Josefine [Opsahl] and I in August 2012 collaborating with an electronic musician, who happened to be my sister. Due to a life changing event, including the birth of my wonderful niece she pulled out shortly after our first concert and We like We continued for a while being a trio. This was an important transition, realizing that we wanted to create all the electronic layers ourselves as a natural expansion of our acoustic instruments instead of having a fourth member with a non classical background effectuating us. One day in the middle of an improvisation session I desperately grabbed a pair of claves and it became crystal clear to everyone in the room, we needed a percussionist. (Haha) Luckily Sara, who was already a friend of Katrine and Josefine’s, had common ideas and courage and joined We like We in the late Summer 2013, completing the band.

SNR: There is definitely a unique chemistry between the four of us. Each of us really needed the platform that We like We is. We all needed to do something more than what we would get from our schools. We wanted to be a part of the initial phase of the creative process – to be more than interpreters.

KFV: Regarding our first concert alongside Efterklang in February 2013, it was of course an extraordinary event for us. It felt like the beginning of something very unique, That night we performed on top of a 1400 ton heavy Diesel engine, wearing handmade costumes, that we designed ourselves and we had even hired a light designer. Liberating, personal and inspiring at the same time. I’ve been touring with Efterklang for a couple of years (singing and playing keys) alongside starting up with We like We back in Copenhagen, so we were already closely connected personally and professionally. Efterklang have curiously followed us from the very beginning, supported us, showing up at our concerts etc. Such an acknowledgement from a band, that is known for taking quite some musically risks themselves, does of course mean a lot to us.

My current favourite must be ‘The Sound Of My Own Voice’. It’s such an utterly captivating composition with intricate string arrangements and stunningly beautiful choral patterns. Please discuss the construction of this particular composition? I wonder did the words and voice parts come first or was it the cello and violin parts? I just love the dynamic, and how the piece gradually unfolds (and blossoms) before your very eyes.

SNR:The Sound of my own Voice’ was supposed to be a strong proclamation of the right to be an individual. In the case of this particular track, the message came before the lyrics and the music. However, we discovered that there is a lot of pain and vulnerability in saying that you only need yourself. It is a battle between individualism and communion… ‘The Sound of my own Voice’ is a track that has had different shapes before the album-version, where we have worked with different melodic patterns played displaced. It becomes a kind of ‘free polyphony’.

I love the sequencing of ‘A New Age of Sensibility’ where several short passages are inter-woven with the more lengthy pieces. For example, ‘I Began To Fall Apart’, despite it being just over one minute in duration, a spectrum of emotion ascends into the forefront of your heart and mind. Was it a conscious decision to include shorter pieces (which also serve wonderfully as interludes) on the album?

SNR: We have thought of the shorter pieces as intermezzi (we mostly use classical terms when talking about music, because that is the language we know). When in the practice room, we would say ‘we need some ginger’ – something to ‘rinse the mouth for new flavours’. It was conscious that some pieces would be short and some long and that some pieces would only involve one or a few of us (‘I’, ‘Wakey Wakey Beast’, ‘Tango’…). We wanted the entire album to be one long narrative but for each track to still tell a story in itself.

The album was mixed in collaboration with sound artist Jacob Kirkegaard. Was there a stage in the music-making process that proved most challenging for you? Also, during the recording sessions themselves, was it a case that happy accidents would occur naturally that would lead to sketches or ideas of a song?

KFV: It was quite an intense but super smooth recording session. 11 tracks in 3 days back in February 2014 at the former National Danish Radio’s epic studios in Copenhagen. Magical almost, suddenly being in a studio, experiencing how we nailed a lot of the tracks in first take. We obviously had common visions. Recording all at once, giving the album this unpolished live touch that I find very compelling.

Having Jacob Kirkegaard on board, was a fine addition to the post-production, as he has such good ears, specialized in mainly unheard sounds. As he is also my partner he and I spent all summer in NYC on an artist in residency programme, working sporadically on the mix from April sending it back and forth across the Atlantic, for the other’s to give feedback. It turned out to be quite a time-consuming and challenging process while our music demands a lot of shaping and balancing, the instruments in between, being super dynamic, consisting of a group of four equally important voices. But it was worth the effort, of course and we wrapped up the final mix by the end of August.

SNR: Working with acoustic instruments alongside a sometimes heavy effectuation can be challenging, or at least it can be time-consuming to get the balance right. There were many magical moments. I remember that the track ‘Unite Me’, we really nailed first take. When we listened to it, right after recording, it was a complete feeling if unified transcendence. We all cried.

‘Anticipation’ conjures up the timeless sound of Steve Reich’s ‘Music For 18 Musicians’ with its sublime rhythmic pulse and compelling arrangements. I would love for you to discuss the various parts to this particular composition.

SNR: We are big fans of Reich so it is nice to be associated with him. ‘Anticipation’ is one of the more energetic pieces on the album and definitely is inspired by minimalistic pulsating rhythm. This helps underline the title as well.

KFV: We wanted to work with an often experienced consequence of anticipation – at least according to us. You are expecting something. You are eager. You are pulsating from excitement. You are narrowing down your experience of what is actually happening, overshadowed by your wishes, your anticipation, instead of staying connected and true to the moment. And suddenly, bang, reality hits you. You are out of breath.

We found it interesting to work with this sort of unexpected collapse. Illustrated by a hectic rhythm suddenly dissolving, breaking down, and turning into a slow tango – out of nowhere. How many times does life actually evolve as anticipated? There is something extremely beautiful about these processes and transformations.

In terms of inspiration and musical influences, please discuss your most cherished composers and artists? Also, what are your earliest musical memories? 

SNR: One of the biggest and also early musical memories is listening to Per Nørgårds I Ching (solo percussion) when I was about eleven. That was when I realized what music could really do. Especially the third movement including a kalimba was mesmerizing to me. My earliest memories is of my father playing the guitar, I think.

KFV: I was very much into Chopin as a kid, but who wasn’t? It’s so catchy and soulful at the same time! Now I listen to all sorts of music and sound. I easily get bored when it comes to mainstream music, classical as well as pop/rock, it’s just too predictable. Silence is great though. I just worked with Julia Holter, and I think she is such an interesting composer. I love when artists manage to create catchy music with a twist. That’s a true skill. Who else… Terry Riley, John Cage, Schumann and Kuku Sebsebe.


 

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A New Age of Sensibility’ is out now on The Being Music.

http://welikewe.com/
http://thebeingmusic.bandcamp.com/

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Road Atlas: Peter Broderick (Part 8)

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Part 8 (and day 17) of our Road Atlas series with Peter Broderick. “(Colours Of The Night) Satellite” is the brand new EP from Peter Broderick, available now via Bella Union.  

Words & Photograph: Peter Broderick

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First things first . . . the concert in Cork tonight has been postponed! Due to weather conditions, our ferry from the UK to Ireland was cancelled. We’re still hoping to make it to Dublin tomorrow, but unfortunately we won’t be in Cork tonight. I really hope we’ll find a date for rescheduling very soon! In the meantime, we had an amazing show in Manchester last night, and we’re now staying at my friend Bernie’s house. Bernie has been hosting bands that play in Manchester for many many years. My first time staying at her house must have been in 2007 or 2008, with Efterklang. . . . and ever since we’ve become good friends, and I’ve stayed in this house at least 5 or 6 times. Nils Frahm and I even recorded a song in Bernie’s basement once! A cover version of the song “Belle” by Taxi Taxi. As sad as I am that the concert in Cork tonight has been cancelled, we are very much appreciating a day off to rest, and I couldn’t have picked a better place to do that. Here is Bernie’s amazing cat, Sootie, sitting on the kitchen table. Awwwwww.

—Peter Broderick

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Peter Broderick’s European tour dates are as follows:

20 Oct   Dublin / The Workman’s Club / Ireland
21 Oct   Reading / The Bowery District / United Kingdom
22 Oct   London / Bush Hall / United Kingdom
23 Oct   Gent / Charlatan / Belgium
24 Oct   Middelburg / De Spot / Netherlands
25 Oct   Zwolle / Let’s Get Lost / Netherlands
26 Oct   Utrecht / Ekko / Netherlands
27 Oct   Berlin / Roter Salon / Germany
29 Oct   Luzern / B-Sides Indoor Festival / Switzerland
31 Oct   Soliera / Cinema Teatro Italia / Italy

*05 Nov   Cork / Half Moon Theatre / Ireland (rescheduled show/Solo performance)*

 


 

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“(Colours Of The Night) Satellite” is available now via Bella Union.

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http://www.peterbroderick.net/
http://bellaunion.com/

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Written by markcarry

October 20, 2014 at 11:53 am

Mixtape: For Peter (A Mixtape by Fractured Air)

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For Peter [A Fractured Air Mix]

A selection of music based on (and inspired by) the music of American-born multi-instrumentalist and singer-songwriter Peter Broderick.

To listen on Mixcloud:

http://www.mixcloud.com/Fractured_Air/for-peter-a-fractured-air-mix/

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Tracklisting:

01. Peter Broderick ‘A Beginning’ [Erased Tapes]
02. Peter Broderick ‘Walking/Thinking’ [Type]
03. Talk Talk ‘Eden’ [Parlophone]
04. Oliveray ‘The Book She Wrote And In The Time’ [Erased Tapes]
05. Nils Frahm ‘Interview Excerpt, November 2012’ [Fractured Air]
06. Nils Frahm ‘Peter’ [Erased Tapes]
07. Rival Consoles ‘Daddy (feat. Peter Broderick)’ [Erased Tapes]
08. Greg Gives Peter Space ‘The Drive’ [Erased Tapes]
09. Efterklang & The Danish National Chamber Orchestra ‘Mirador’ (Live) [Leaf, Rumraket]
10. Peter Broderick ‘The Path to Recovery’ [Erased Tapes]
11. Lubomyr Melnyk ‘Interview Excerpt, March 2013’ [Fractured Air]
12. Lubomyr Melnyk ‘Pockets Of Light’ (Excerpt) [Erased Tapes]
13. The Album Leaf ‘Never Held a Baby’ (feat. Peter Broderick) [Not On Label]
14. Tiny Vipers ‘Dreamer’ [Sub Pop]
15. Peter Broderick ‘An Ending’ [Erased Tapes]

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The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or their respective record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.


 

Peter Broderick (plus band) with special guest Loch Lomond performs at the Half Moon Theatre, Cork on Sunday 19 October 2014. Tickets are €15, available now from Cork Opera House box office, Emmet Place, Cork and online from the link below.

PURCHASE TICKETS HERE:
http://www.corkoperahouse.ie/events/peter-broderick-plus-band

 

For full European tour dates please visit:

http://www.peterbroderick.net/
http://www.erasedtapes.com/

 


 

Written by admin

July 29, 2014 at 3:17 pm