FRACTURED AIR

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Chosen One: Carlos Cipa

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Interview with Carlos Cipa.

“The examination of musical form, harmony or mostly rhythm is an ongoing stimulation for my thinking about writing music and expressing yourself through music.”

—Carlos Cipa

Words: Mark Carry

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Last November marked the highly anticipated sophomore full-length release from the gifted Munich-based composer and multi-instrumentalist, Carlos Cipa. ‘All Your Life You Walk’ is a collection of stunningly beautiful piano-based compositions; representing an artist at the height of his powers. The latest offering – and follow-up to Cipa’s mesmerising debut ‘The Monarch and the Viceroy’ (both albums released on the prestigious German-based Denovali imprint) – features an array of rare instruments, found sounds, atmospheric touches and gentle beats that evokes an utterly timeless and deeply affecting experience.

Over the last two years, the German composer amassed a treasure of musical instruments that were no longer in use: a very rare instrument built by Hohner in the 1960’s, primarily played by musicians like Warren Ellis, Leo Abraham and Mum; an old radio receiver that belonged to Cipa’s grandparents (serving the magical opening tones of ‘All Your Life You Walk’); an old Framus bass guitar from the 60’s among several others. Above all, the Cipa’s deft touch of hand and resolutely unique sounds generated from the piano instrument becomes the vital pulse to the record’s rich sonic tapestry. A series of fragments are wonderfully embedded in the album’s striking narrative that further adds to the ethereal dimension the music effortlessly taps into. The album was self-recorded, performed and produced by the German composer in his very own “Beatschappen Studio.”

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‘All Your Life You Walk’ is available now on Denovali.

http://www.carloscipa.com/
http://denovali.com/

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Interview with Carlos Cipa.

Congratulations Carlos on the incredible new album, ‘All Your Life You Walk’. It’s a real pleasure to talk to you again and discuss this very special record. Firstly, I love how the musical compositions are deeply embedded in this entirely other space and dimension. For example, the inclusion of several fragment pieces – dotted throughout the record – adds to this sense of journey and how ‘All Your Life You Walk’ is a captivating and cohesive whole. Please discuss the making of this new record, Carlos and please shed some light on the album-title and the ideas you wanted to explore on ‘All Your Life You Walk’?

Carlos Cipa: Thanks a lot for all your interest in my work and these kind words, it’s a pleasure to speak with you again and talk about my new album with you. I’ve been working on the compositions, musical ideas and the whole concept of “All Your Life You Walk” over the last two years but the main part of the work has been done in the summer from June to September (2014). First, I finished composing all the piano parts and piano solo songs and then recorded everything on piano only. After that I continued working on writing and recording the fragments and the different colours I wanted to add to the certain songs. Every sound and instrument is carefully chosen. It’s just the exact amount of instrumental facets I wanted to add to the songs.

The title is a reference to a favourite poem of mine by Kurt Tucholsky called “Augen in der Großstadt” (engl. “Eyes in the Big City”). One of the lines has been translated in English; also all the song titles are references to different things that inspire me, films, song lyrics, poems, etc.

My current favourite is the sublime ‘Hang On To Your Lights’, I particularly love the rhythmic and percussive elements to your piano playing. Are there certain techniques or processes you have expanded on this record? In terms of writing, I wonder is a piece like ‘Hang On To Your Lights’ quite a gradual unfolding before the music is given its wings, and in full-bloom, so to speak?

CC: That’s great, it might also be my favourite. For this piece I really took long time to develop the composition. I worked strictly with scores for the piano part, so everything was written down before recording. The pattern in the right hand is developing throughout the whole piece, but the bar is always changing so you never get a feeling of rest (the piece has nearly 80 bar changes and several different tempi). The rhythmic elements are sounds from the inside of the piano; I created the beat with felt beaters on the cast iron frame and then processed it a bit with the computer. The drone/ambient sounds are piano strings plucked, bowed, picked recorded and cut, processed and layered in the computer. For a piece of that length, that’s based on a little loop pattern, I believe it’s really important to be absolutely precise with every bar in the piece and to create a million little details so it never gets boring and you’re always able to explore something new in every second of the piece.

You collected a wide array of fabulous instruments that have found their way on ‘All Your Life You Walk’, further heightening the deeply personal sound of the creations. I would love for you to discuss these instruments and the beautiful stories that are behind each and every one of these special instruments. For example, are the first notes heard on the album the sound of the radio receiver belonging to your grandparents? Also, the very rare instrument built by Hohner in the 60’s must have been a miracle of a discovery for you?

CC: I’d love to talk you through them. Let’s start with the “Hohner Guitaret”; it’s been built in the 60’s only for a very short period of time. It was meant for use in a Jazz combo but never really found its place there. It’s a “kalimba-phone” instrument but with electroacoustic pick-ups, so it can be used similar to a guitar, but has a totally different, very unique sound. You can hear it on tracks 3, 4, 9 and 11. I processed it with a variety of effects.

Then there’s the “Marimba” (heard on songs 3, 4, 5, 9, 11), it belonged to a childhood friend, and he stopped playing at a certain age and the instrument was getting all dusty in their attic until I asked him if can use it for recording and now it has it’s own space in my studio. The same goes for the “Hackbrett” (heard at the beginning and throughout song 11) but this was actually the instrument of his brother, another childhood friend of mine.

The radio receiver is as you say the beginning and ending of the album. I’ve the great luck to live and work in the house my grandparents built by them in the 50s after the war and I wanted to make a connection to them and to the space. This radio receiver was in their possession for a very long time and even if it doesn’t sound “perfect”, I am very happy that it has found its way on the record. The E-bass (also on tracks 3,4,9 and 11) is a very rare jazz bass built by Framus in the 60s, I discovered in a vintage music store here in Munich. I just love the wooden sound and how it melts with the piano and all the other instruments.

Then there are a variety of percussion instruments I collected over the years, a glockenspiel, a sansula, an ocean harp and some African instruments. I also added a second piano sound to my music; it’s coming from an upright piano, played with the felt pedal. I bought this beautiful instrument from an old lady who stopped playing and I really love how the mellow sound melts with my grand piano. All other sounds are piano inside sounds, plucked strings, bowed strings, e-bowed strings, muted notes, harmonics, layered and processed in the computer.

I would love to gain an insight please onto the space of your very own “Beatschuppen Studio”? What is the set-up in the studio itself, Carlos?

CC: As said before, I am living and working in the house of my grandparents, it’s an old house from the 50s and I built my little studio in the basement over the last few years. I work in two rooms and my grand piano is upstairs in the living room, so most of the time recording means running up and down stairs… it keeps you fit, though. At the moment I am working with RME interfaces and pre-amps and mostly Neumann microphones, I prefer to keep it simple and this setup is working out just fine for the moment.

I can also shed some light on the name of the studio; one of the basement rooms was the child room of my mother when she was growing up in this house and she used to be a big fan of the Beatles (like me) and so she used to call her room like that (in English kind of like “beat music shed”). I thought it’s a funny name for a studio.

I love the cinematic feel that permeates the cathartic ‘Step Out From Time’. Can you talk me through this piece of music please?

CC: I think you get this feeling because this piece might be the one that has the least solo-piano feel to it. This might originate mostly in the instrumentation/production. I divided left and right hand into two different instruments (the right hand plays the melody on the clear and brilliant grand piano, the left hand plays accompanying figures on the mellow and soft felt muted upright). All the other sounds (bowed Hackbrett, Guitaret, bass guitar, marimba) are interwoven with both these piano elements to create a levitating atmosphere around it. The whole piece is based on the little fifth-based melody that spins around throughout the whole piece, until the piece finds rest in those choral-like upright chords in the end. In November, I rearranged the piece for a dance performance for a little ensemble, piano, flute, violin and cello and it worked out really great. I hope I can upload a proper recording in the near future.

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You are currently studying contemporary classical composition. I would love to know more about this area of study and indeed what contemporary classical compositions have served (and continue to serve) the biggest influence on you? You are involved in every aspect of the music-making process, from recording to producing; I wonder do you see these various stages as same thing?

CC: Even though I am studying classical composition at the moment, I think my work for the records is something totally different. To include the aspect of recording and producing (which means I indeed totally equate these two things with the process of composing, which opens yourself doors that otherwise would be shut), the aspect of sound in the compositions (and also even the aspect of writing music for an audience), means distancing yourself from existing methods in the contemporary classical scene. Also, of course, my musical language draws equally from popular music and classical music, which also separates me from that particular scene.

But despite that, I learned so much from contemporary music, not only from the usual suspects (like Reich or the minimalists) but also from a lot of other totally different composers. The examination of musical form, harmony or mostly rhythm is an ongoing stimulation for my thinking about writing music and expressing yourself through music. I included most of these recent influences in the mixtape I compiled for your site a while ago. Of course all those wonderful composers wrote a hell lot more amazing pieces that are equally worth checking out. Contemporary classical music is a very difficult field of music to get into, especially in Germany, but once you start discovering some of the rare diamonds, you are able to comb through the jungle of terrible stuff that seems to be everywhere you look.

You must be very excited to play shows across Europe this December. Forgive the generalization (in advance) but discuss the magical moments and emotions that you, as a composer must experience when performing these piano compositions live to an audience?

CC: The tour has been amazing. It’s always great to be on the road with my fellow label friend Poppy Ackroyd, but this tour was even more fun then before. I am very happy with my live set at the moment, playing the new pieces is really special and I got great responses from all the audiences about the concerts and the new album. I am also doing a little more improvisation than before, which makes it also more interesting and joy for me to play, because you never know what will happen and you get a chance to explore the different pianos and the different responses from audiences every night in a better way than if you’re just performing the songs. That’s something I really love about touring.

What records have you been enjoying the most these past few months, Carlos?

CC: The new Björk album. I can’t wait for the vinyl. This album is just so beautiful and amazing, I can’t stop listening and loving it. From the wonderful production to the amazing string arrangements, of course her always fascinating voice and the incredible beautiful and challenging songs/compositions. It’s just perfect.

Brian Reitzell’s score for TV series “Hannibal”, very recently released on vinyl. I adored the score in the series, but this collection for the records is even more rewarding!!

Alfred Schnittke – Concerto grosso No. I, a wonderful piece by one of the best composers of the 20th century. Even if it is a famous piece, it’s still totally underrated in contemporary classical music.

 


 

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‘All Your Life You Walk’ is available now on Denovali.

http://www.carloscipa.com/
http://denovali.com/

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Written by markcarry

March 3, 2015 at 3:12 pm

Fractured Air 20: Contemporary Classical Composers (A Mixtape by Carlos Cipa)

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The Munich, Germany-based pianist and composer Carlos Cipa has released two records to date: the stunning debut solo full-length LP ‘The Monarch And The Viceroy’ (2012, Denovali Records) and ‘Relive’ (2014, Denovali Records), an EP recorded in collaboration with partner Sophia Jani. ‘Relive’ contain the side-length tracks ‘Anouk’s Dream’ and ‘Whatever A Sun Will Always Sing’; both written specially for the pair’s performance at the Denovali Swingfest 2013 in Essen. The resultant compositions were played exactly as in the live situation with no electronic manipulation. Both classical and modern artists provide inspiration for Cipa’s work as a composer: Cipa has cited the great composers such as Mozart, Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky; while the works of modern bands such as The National, Mogwai, Sigur Rós and Nick Cave have also influenced Cipa’s outlook as an artist.

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“Contemporary Classical Composers”

To listen on Mixcloud:
http://www.mixcloud.com/Fractured_Air/fractured-air-20-contemporary-classical-composers-a-mixtape-by-carlos-cipa/

“This is a compilation of some of my favourite pieces of 20th century classical composers. It’s always hard to fit classical music into a mixtape, especially to separate pieces/movements out of their context. I tried my best, but most of the pieces are part of a greater work, so I encourage you to listen to the complete opus and enjoy it as a whole.”

—Carlos Cipa

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Tracklisting:

01. Igor Stravinsky – Symphony in 3 Movements, I. Allegro (9:41)
02. Steve Reich – Double Sextet, III. Fast (6:43)
03. Maurice Ravel – String Quartet in F Major, I. Moderato, très doux (7:38)
04. Charles Ives – The Unanswered Question (4:35)
05. Erkki-Sven Tüür – Insula Deserta (9:10)
06. Nico Muhly – Revd Mustard his Installation Prelude (3:35)
07. David Lang – The Little Match Girl Passion, I. Come, Daughter (3:41)
08. Olivier Messiaen – Oraison (7:45)
09. György Ligeti – Nonsense Madrigals, III. The Alphabet (3:33)
10. Krzysztof Penderecki – Chaconne (6:47)
11. Dmitri Shostakovich – String Quartet No. 8, II. Allegro Molto (2:38)
12. George Crumb – Black Angels, I. Departure (5:37)
13. Hans Otte – Das Buch der Klänge, Part X (5:57)
14. Thomas Adès – Arcadiana, op. 12, VI. O Albion (3:07)
15. John Adams – Hallelujah Junction, Part I (7:14)
16. Claude Vivier – Zipangu (14:06)
17. György Kurtag – Stele, op. 33, III. Molto sostenuto (05:55)

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Notes on selection by Carlos Cipa:

01. Igor Stravinsky – Symphony in 3 Movements, I. Allegro (9:41)
He is the master. The sense for rhythm and pulse is just incredible. He was one of the most innovative voices of all time. You can learn so much from Stravinsky, regardless what music you create.

02. Steve Reich – Double Sextet, III. Fast (6:43)
You don’t need to say something about Steve Reich. Definitely one of the most influential composers of the second part of the 20th century. This piece is a rather new one, that won him the Pulitzer prize. The whole piece is amazing!

03. Maurice Ravel – String Quartet in F Major, I. Moderato, très doux (7:38)
One of the most beautiful pieces ever written. I deeply love string quartet as instrumentation, it will never sound antique, always timeless. And Ravel’s String Quartet is one of the best.

04. Charles Ives – The Unanswered Question (4:35)
A classic piece. But still, Ives is an underrated composer; what he thought of and did in his music was always much more experimental and much more modern than a lot of his contemporaries. This piece is from 1908!!! True beauty and innovation.

05. Erkki-Sven Tüür – Insula Deserta (9:10)
Written in 1989, this is one of the most interesting pieces of the last twenty-odd years. Tüür has an incredible unique voice, that always touches me deeply.

06. Nico Muhly – Revd Mustard his Installation Prelude (3:35)
Fantastically played on the album ‘Cycles’ by James McVinnie, this is an amazingly beautiful piece. And the sound and the colour of this instrument is incredible.

07. David Lang – The Little Match Girl Passion, I. Come, Daughter (3:41)
David Lang is a master in terms of voices and singing. It’s very encouraging to write for voice, when you listen to his beautiful music.

08. Olivier Messiaen – Oraison (7:45)
The beautiful sound of this instrument (Ondes Martenot), such a beautiful piece of music.

09. György Ligeti – Nonsense Madrigals, III. The Alphabet (3:33)
His output is so versatile, so colourful, and regardless what he touches, he creates something unique, something new, but always in the most musical sense. That’s a very rare gift in contemporary classical music.

10. Krzysztof Penderecki – Chaconne (6:47)
Last year he was in Munich for a concert with our chamber orchestra and they played this and a lot of other beautiful pieces he wrote in the last 15 years. Before the concert he was being interviewed by the conductor and just told funny stories about his work. Very inspiring and friendly person.

11. Dmitri Shostakovich – String Quartet No. 8, II. Allegro Molto (2:38)
Probably, his most famous piece, but the energy in this music is unmatched. This is only four instruments, but you feel a group of a hundred running over you. Very hard to get this movement out of it’s context, all the movements are fantastic.

12. George Crumb – Black Angels, I. Departure (5:37)
You have to look at his scores. Everything is written by hand, he was a master of calligraphy and to see the relation between notation and how it sounds is just amazing.

13. Hans Otte – Das Buch der Klänge, Part X (5:57)
Rather unknown German composer, one of the few who were inspired by american minimal composers and made a beautiful piano cycle called “Das Buch der Klänge”.

14. Thomas Adès – Arcadiana, op. 12, VI. O Albion (3:07)
And again a String Quartet, this is very unusual for Adès, but I believe it’s the most beautiful 3 minutes he ever wrote.

15. John Adams – Hallelujah Junction, Part I (7:14)
A minimal classic. I recently saw this piece performed live, and it was really an amazing experience.

16. Claude Vivier – Zipangu (14:06)
I had to include this piece, despite its length, it’s just too beautiful. String Orchestra is another beautiful instrumentation, and Vivier is an underrated master when it comes to it.

17. György Kurtag – Stele, op. 33, III. Molto sostenuto (05:55)
This might be the piece that impressed me the most lately. The use of the orchestra is incredible, (it has 12 double basses!!). Kurtag is a master in saying so much in such a short time. Impressive. It’s hard to separate the movements, go check out the whole piece, it’s incredible!

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‘The Monarch And The Viceroy’ LP and ‘Relive’ EP are available now on Denovali.

http://www.carloscipa.com/
http://denovali.com/

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Interview with Carlos Cipa HERE.
To follow Fractured Air you can do so on Facebook HERE, & Twitter HERE.

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Written by admin

July 14, 2014 at 2:34 pm

Step Right Up: Carlos Cipa & Sophia Jani

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Interview with Carlos Cipa & Sophia Jani.

“The classical background is definitely important for us, especially for the playing but also for writing the pieces. In the end it’s the love for popular/modern music, though, which brings us to make the kind of music we do.”

—Carlos Cipa

Words: Mark Carry, Illustration: Craig Carry

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Earlier this year marked the release of a special collaboration between the gifted young musical talents of Germany’s Carlos Cipa and Sophia Jani. The two-piece collaboration, entitled ‘Relive’, was released on the ever-dependable Denovali label, which contains two stunning neo-classical works: ‘Anouk’s Dream’ and ‘Whatever A Sun Will Always Sing’.

‘Relive’ is appropriately titled, especially when you consider the compositions themselves were played exactly as in the live situation (with no electronic manipulation), which became a very important theme throughout this collaboration. Both pieces were written for the pair’s performance at the Denovali Swingfest 2013 in Essen. The idea was to jointly compose two piano pieces for four hands, which do not only include playing the ordinary way, but also utilising rather unusual sounds from inside the piano. The result is nothing short of staggering that brings to mind luminaries such as Hauschka, Nils Frahm and Max Richter. The contemporary techniques included plucking and beating the strings with their fingers or different kinds of beaters, bowing them with nylon guitar strings, creating harmonics while pressing fingers down on the strings during playing, using the aeolian harp technique or creating beats on the cast iron frame. The endless array of sounds, timbres and textures that Cipa and Jani create from their beloved piano instrument is a joy to witness, as is the deep musical telepathy that flows throughout the utterly transcendent creations.

‘Relive’ is the follow-up to Cipa’s solo — and Denovali debut full-length  — entitled ‘The Monarch and the Viceroy’, released in the summer of 2012. At the tender age of 6 he began taking classical piano lessons with various renowned teachers. Ten years later after he started playing drums in different bands he became more and more interested in composition and improvisation. In the following years he made experiences in different music styles like jazz, hardcore/punk, indie rock and orchestral music. In recent years, Cipa has shared the stage with the leading lights of modern-classical music: Icelandic composers Ólafur Arnalds, Valgeir Sigurðsson; Germany’s Nils Frahm and the legendary duo A Winged Victory For The Sullen. Still in his early twenties — like Jani — a vast collection of artistic treasures will undoubtedly see the light of day, from this exceptionally talented pianist.

Sophia Jani discovered her fascination for piano at a similarly young age. She is classically trained on piano and violin and has deepened her skills at the conservatory of music in Munich before she began studying piano at the conservatory in Bordeaux, France. The young musician left Bordeaux after one year turning away from just interpreting classical pieces to concentrate on writing her own music. Recently, Jani has developed an interest in film-scoring as well as experimenting with vocals.

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‘Relive’ is available now on Denovali Records.

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Interview with Carlos Cipa & Sophia Jani.

Congratulations Carlos and Sophia on your truly breathtaking work ‘Relive’. I have been obsessed with this record of late, and have fallen particularly for the ambient flow of sound you so effortlessly create. The two pieces ‘Anouk’s Dream’ and ‘Whatever A Sun Will Always Sing’ were written for your performance at the Denovali Swingfest 2013 in Essen. The root to this special collaboration is the live performance, and indeed your shared love for composition and improvisation. Please take me back to the concert in Essen, and the creative process involved with writing these two sublime piano-based compositions? I can imagine you had certain aims or guidelines in mind for this project?

Carlos: Thank you very much for your kind words! That’s rather appreciated. We’d love to tell you more about our work and the writing and recording of “Relive”.

We’ve been together for a very long time, but have never made any music together, so during summer holidays we decided it was about time to be creative. As we both play the piano as our main instrument, it came very naturally to focus on this instrument. As the problem with four-hands piano music on one piano is, that it can get very boring after a few minutes, we had to think about a solution for that problem. Since it was not very realistic to get two pianos on stage, we decided to experiment with the inside of the piano and searched for interesting sounds to combine with the four-hands playing. We used only a few utensils to help us creating the sounds (like guitar nylon strings or different kinds of beaters) but refused to use any kind of electronics, as we wanted to stay as natural as possible. As we also wanted to present our solo works on that particular concert, we decided to write two longer pieces which should frame the solo parts. That was also the birth of this collaboration EP called “Relive”.

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The plethora of sounds you generate from the piano instrument is really amazing. For example, ‘Anouk’s Dream’ contains distinct movements which ranges from the more traditional piano sounds to the more experimental. Can you please talk me through the various techniques you use throughout these particular pieces of music? For example, the “aeolian harp” technique that is utilized opens up a beautiful awakening of joyous sound. I also love the beating sound that conjures up the sound of Steve Reich’s rhythmic pulses.

Carlos: In “Anouk’s Dream” you can hear bowed strings at the beginning. Each one of us had a nylon guitar string with a lot of resin on it, and we combined finger picking and bowing to build up the first part of the piece. In the middle part you hear felt beaters hitting the cast iron frame (there are three main stress bars, which fortunately have different key notes) and the same beaters hitting the low a- and e- string. Another technique that was used in this piece is the “Aeolian harp”-technique, first used by Henry Cowell in 1923, where you press down keys silently and allow them to sound by sliding over the open strings. The last part of the piece is us picking the strings at different positions (in the middle of the string for a rich sound and near the pin blocks for a more restrained sound). The second piece “Whatever A Sun Will Always Sing” picks up the idea of beating the lower strings with the felt beater and also the beating of the cast iron frame. A new technique in this piece is the creation of harmonics, where one player presses down his fingers on the exact position for the flageolet on the strings and the other player presses the key.

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During the recording process, neither of the compositions had changed in any way from the initial live performance. Was it a challenge to capture the energy of the live performance in the studio environment? Where was ‘Relive’ recorded?

Carlos: The two pieces of “Relive” were recorded in our home studio in Munich. The recording really was a challenge! As there are so many different parts and different techniques, it was not able to record the pieces with the same position of microphones, for example the beating of the cast iron frame needs a really close position of the microphones to sound as rich as in a live performance. After all, we are really happy with the resulting recordings, but it surely was an intense weekend!

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‘Relive’ is a record that conveys the special musical telepathy that exists between two like-minded artists and composers. I would love for you to discuss how you first crossed paths with one another? How soon did you realize that a collaboration would blossom?

Carlos: Funnily, we’ve known each other since elementary school as we had the same piano teacher for nearly 7 years. After having changed to different teachers we met again and eventually fell in love with each other (we’ve been together for 6 years now). At this time I started to make my own music and Sophia left after a year of classical piano studies the musical paths for 4 years to study economic. She returned to music last summer to concentrate on writing her own stuff. At this moment it was obvious, that we would do something together, and finally last summer we could find the time to compose these two pieces.

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Please talk me through your musical backgrounds? I can imagine you both must have been immersed in music from a very young age?

Sophia: We both started taking piano lessons at the age of 6 and followed the classical path for nearly 12 years. After school, I couldn’t see myself as a classical pianist and left the musical path to study economics. During those studies I began to write own pieces on the piano and after finishing the studies this drew me back to music. Though, I still enjoy playing classical pieces, I can only see a way for me in writing my own music. I love to experiment, try new things, but in my own way.

Carlos: For me the turning point was when I started playing drums at the age of 16 and eventually played in a hardcore band with 3 of my best friends. From this moment on, I started to write my own music on the piano and saw a way in music for me. Right now I am studying classical composition.

The classical background is definitely important for us, especially for the playing but also for writing the pieces. In the end it’s the love for popular/modern music, though, which brings us to make the kind of music we do. We think it’s advantageous if you’re a part of both worlds, especially if you work mainly with instruments that have a classical connotation.

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It must be special to be on the Denovali roster. It’s a label that ceaselessly inspires and with each new release, a new discovery is made. The latest one for me is your ‘Relive’ record. It must be a wonderful time to be making music, particularly with the strength of modern-classical music that is out there, especially in the last few years. Can you discuss what music you are passionate about of late and what composers and records (old and new) have inspired you the most to make music?

Carlos: You’re right, it is really amazing to have the opportunity to release music on such a great label as Denovali. As you say the times now are really great to make music that definitely has roots in classical music but still has its place in popular music. As mentioned before, we think it is really important to know both worlds. That being said, inspiration comes in equal measure from the great composers (like Mozart, Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky, etc…), but also from modern bands like The National, Mogwai, Sigur Rós (and many many more). Right now, LPs who are rarely leaving our record player are the new Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds (“Push the Sky Away”), the new David Lang pieces (“Death speaks”) and also Haim (“Days Are Gone”) and Daughter (“If you leave”).

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What’s next for both of you? Are there future projects on the horizon for you? I wish you all the best with the release of ‘Relive’ and congratulations once again on the remarkable record.

Carlos: Thank you once again for your words and wishes! Right now we’re working on new material.

Sophia: I am currently writing music for a short film, and preparing pieces for a debut album.

Carlos: Whereas I had a concert premiere of a string quartet piece last week and from now on I can find the time to get back to working on my second full-length solo-album.

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‘Relive’ is available now on Denovali Records. 

http://www.carloscipa.com
http://denovali.com

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Read our interviews with fellow Denovali labelmates Birds Of Passage (HERE), and Dale Cooper Quartet (HERE).

This year’s Denovali Swingfest — showcasing the best in experimental music — takes place in London (18th-19th April), Berlin (25th-26th April) and Essen (02-05th October), with guests including The Haxan Cloak (UK), Ulrich Schnauss (Ger) and Anna Von Hausswolff (Swe) [London]; Murcof (Mex), Oneohtrix Point Never (US) and John Lemke (UK) [Berlin].

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Written by admin

April 8, 2014 at 11:57 am