FRACTURED AIR

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Posts Tagged ‘Alicia Merz

Chosen One: Birds Of Passage

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Interview with Alicia Merz, Birds Of Passage.

“Hmm, let’s see … You send the music deep enough into your heart so that it makes your body undergo a kind of a physical shift, and simultaneously the listener’s body also undergoes the same kind of physical shift. It’s giving birth to that kind of shared state.”

(taken from Haruki Murakami’s ‘After Dark’)

Words & Illustration: Craig Carry

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Japanese author Haruki Murakami’s dreamlike novel ‘After Dark’ tells the story of various characters whose lives intertwine on one night (between the hours of 11:56 P.M. and 6:52 A.M. to be precise). The central character to the plot is young student Mari Asai, who, in the opening scene (at a nondescript late-night Denny’s), has a chance meeting with Takahashi — an old school acquaintance of Mari’s older sister Eri — who is a passionate trombone player playing in a local jazz band. Takahashi later confides in Mari his frank admission that he is not talented enough for a career in music so he has regretfully decided to study to become a lawyer instead. It is the particular description that Takahashi uses to describe his feelings about what music can potentially do — for both musician and audience — which struck me most while reading Murakami’s nocturnal masterclass.

Both musicians and music audiences can of course appreciate these words. Music can indeed communicate powerfully and resonate indelibly with the lives of others. Forming a shared connection while providing a special bond or connection with a listener is a powerful, precious thing. What’s perhaps most special (and rare) of all is when music can genuinely move somebody. Time and again, this is the effect that the music of Birds Of Passage has for me. Birds Of Passage is the pseudonym for the New Zealand-based composer Alicia Merz, who — since her debut ‘Without The World’ in early 2011 — has been quietly making her own unique blend of wholly engaging and deeply moving music. There is a deep sense of intimacy shared between listener and composer as Merz “truly whispers” to each and every person who is fortunate enough to cross paths with her. Alicia Merz makes music like her life depends on it. In fact, I would imagine music is not simply an extension of her, it simply is her. Over the course of three LP’s (‘Without The World’, ‘Dear and Unfamiliar’ and ‘Winter Lady’) and several EP’s and collaborations, Birds Of Passage has been creating quietly breathtaking worlds for the listener to navigate and experience. In turn, while exploring the dense maze-like patterns of her music we identify our own deepest hopes, fears and dreams — and learn something about ourselves — in the process.

Like a force of nature, ‘Ashes To Ashes’ begins with a brooding, drone and ambient-swept passage, reverberating magnificently in all directions. The highly textured and mightily condensed sequence is perfectly offset by Alicia Merz’s soft whispered vocals. “Will you find me here?” asks Merz in a heavenly vocal — delivered in a similarly magical effect to the vocals of Liz Harris or Julianna Barwick — casting a spell on the listener immediately. Before we know it we are already deep inside the innermost caverns of ‘This Kindly Slumber’s mysterious and complex maze of real and imagined landscapes. Like Guilermo Del Toro’s ‘Pan’s Labyrinth’ we have — like the film’s central character, Ofelia, on her journey through the trials of an old labyrinth garden — set afoot on a magical, danger-filled world steeped in both fantasy and reality. “Will you save me here?” calls the angelic voice across the hazy, minimalist backdrop.

“Moonlight come and find me / Hidden behind my closed eyes” sings Merz on ‘Belle de Jour’, where a beautiful (near-childlike) keyboard rhythm opens proceedings, as we dig deeper into slumber, uncovering innermost feelings and deeply personal secrets along our way. Later, a wonderfully pitched guitar line weaves its way through the arrangement (recalling ‘Lampyre Bonne Chère’, Alicia Merz’s majestic collaboration with fellow-label-mates Dale Cooper Quartet) adding a sense of foreboding to the innocent quality possessed by the keyboard and vocal arrangements. “I dreamt I stole your kisses / I stole them while you slumbered” sings Merz on the song’s verse. One of the album’s most precious moments arrives later as Merz sings: “This mask I wear is wounded like the soldier underneath / This heart I hide is delicate and worn”. Interestingly, the lyrics draw a line back to Birds Of Passage’s previous album, ‘Winter Lady’, and ‘Highwaymen in Midnight Masks’, in particular, where a similar aching sense of vulnerability is shared. Unsurprisingly, the night and darkness provides recurring imagery throughout ‘This Kindly Slumber’, as we surrender to the moon and stars above, helpless to the fate they hold in store for us. “My light is almost gone” concludes ‘Belle de Jour’, while any faded embers of light are by now well and truly extinguished.

My current personal favorite is the glorious ‘And All Of Your Dreams’, a dynamic and rhythmic delight. On first listen I was immediately drawn back to witnessing Colleen’s Cécile Schott performing ‘Once Upon a Time There Was a Pretty Fly (Lullaby)’ live in concert (a song she performed on numerous occasions last year). The song — taken from the score to the 1955 Charles Laughton film noir classic ‘The Night Of The Hunter’ — features the following lyrics: “Once upon a time / There was a pretty fly / He had a pretty wife / This pretty fly / But one day / She flew away / Flew away”, creating a beguiling spell upon the audience in the process. A similar timelessness is forever distilled in Jack Clayton’s 1961 gothic horror ‘The Innocents’, where the song ‘O Willow Waly’ (written specifically for the film and wondrously sung by Isla Cameron) serves a critical point to the plot’s arc and to the film’s eventual outcome. During the second verse of ‘And All Of Your Dreams’, Merz chooses to add an excerpt from the fairytale ‘Ladybird, Ladybird’ (sometimes referred to as ‘Ladybug Ladybug’), the english version of the tale dates back to the Eighteenth Century. The song’s chorus begins with the nursery rhyme extract: “Ladybird, ladybird / Fly away home / Your house is on fire / Your children are gone”, proceeded by Merz’s heartfelt lyric: “And all of your dreams, they came true / And all of your dreams / Died with you”, similarly embodying (in an instant) the sense of both hope and fear, light and dark; the contrast which forms the blood-flow throughout ‘This Kindly Slumber’.

The magical ‘Stranger’ stands at the centre of ‘This Kindly Slumber’s seven tracks, the guitar-picked and high-pitched vocal carves out a ray of light on proceedings as Merz’s delicate whisper is now more dominant in the mix, it is as if the album’s central character is now beginning to find her voice (and place) in the world of these dark plains. A sense of comfort and semblance of solace is sought — if not yet attained — as Merz sings “Bestowed your kindness on me” across the thinly veiled sonic layers of voice and guitar in the background as they ebb and flow at their own accord, recalling the ambient flourishes of such labels as Touch or Kranky (or composers such as Kyle Bobby Dunn or Loscil) in the process. There’s something deeply touching about the moment when Merz sings the solitary word “stranger”, it’s like the extent and scale of the darkness is only now being fully realized.

‘Take My Breath’ features a soothing, guitar-picked accompaniment where the repeated harp-like pattern and background harmony-like voices shroud Merz’s vocals in heightened mystery, blurring the lines of reality in the process. ‘Take My Breath’ is repeated like a mantra at the song’s close,  merging in a dreamlike fashion with the harmonic ambience in it’s midst. Like all Birds Of Passage’s material to date, the sequencing of any recorded material is painstakingly done like some time-honored craft. ‘Yesterday’s Stains’ begins with the forceful press of piano keys, before the album’s most intimate and vulnerable song begins to take shape. “Suicide child / With life in her veins / Blood for tomorrow / In yesterday’s stains” sings Merz in near-hypnotized fashion recalling the timeless, fear-filled and deeply moving songs of Mark Linkous’s Sparklehorse.

Album closer ‘Lonesome Tame’ opens with the combination of both ambient and field-recording textures, building in momentum while Merz asks: “Will they welcome you?”. It’s the kind of piece that could be augmented by a 12-piece orchestra or choral symphony, but, in doing so, would only lessen the impact made by the impeccable talents of the lone figure of Alicia Merz. The moment Merz sings “Will they welcome you? / mmm mmm mmm” — offset by a series of solitary piano notes in the background — serves to capture the heartbreaking quality of Daniel Johnston’s songbook while conveying the magical otherworldly quality found in music by Belgium’s Christina Vantzou or Iceland’s Jóhann Jóhannsson.

The album culminates in an extended passage of reverie and slumber as Merz’s deeply personal nocturnal voyage comes to a close. It’s a life-affirming journey which finds Merz navigating the darkest of nights while facing her gravest of fears. On the other side of this kindly slumber we realize that even the darkest of shadows lie closest to light: through the sacred and secret songs of Birds Of Passage we learn that in every moment of hopelessness exists hope. For that, we can be eternally grateful.

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‘This Kindly Slumber’ is available now on Denovali Records.

https://www.facebook.com/birdsofpassagemusic
http://denovali.com

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Interview with Alicia Merz, Birds Of Passage.

I love how the title ‘This Kindly Slumber’ works so beautifully for the album as a whole. There’s such real emotion and feeling within the album itself and yet these powerful and moving moments almost reveal themselves gradually over time to the listener. I suppose this is partly to do with the ambient and dreamlike textures that create such a heightened atmosphere in your songs. The listening experience is a deeply intimate and genuinely moving one. What does the title of the album mean for you, Alicia?

AM: That is something that I actually would rather not convey. Although there is a reason and meaning in my mind for the title, I really want to leave it up to the listeners to interpret it for themselves, how they want or need to. I would much rather that. 🙂

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How did the process for the making of ‘This Kindly Slumber’ differ from ‘Winter Lady’?

AM: I guess the main way it differed was in that I wrote and recorded the songs very spread out, in between a lot of things happening in my personal life. So I think everything was quite disjointed in that way. Not extremely so, just more so than with ‘Winter Lady’. I still always work on a song until it’s finished, and all it needs, in my mind at least, is little fixes which I can go back to later.

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I love the more abstract and ambient/drone textures which your songs gravitate towards at times during ‘This Kindly Slumber’ (‘Ashes to Ashes’ and ‘Lonesome Tame’, for example). They set that dreamlike and intimate tone for the album as a whole so wonderfully and recall people like Julianna Barwick’s recent ‘Nepenthe’ or Grouper’s material. In terms of building these songs, how was this process for the album itself? Would they have all been demoed in a similar way or did the process vary for different songs?

AM: If I’m answering your question correctly, I think all of my songs are what they are, first off. I don’t like to re-do things because I really think that the first takes are the most pure and hold the most feeling. I have actually sometimes tried to re-sing a vocal or something, for the release, and always gone back to the original, because it always held something that the “re-sings” didn’t have. ‘Ashes to Ashes’ was impromptu.

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I was really struck by the special connection that exists between the nursery rhyme ‘Ladybird, Ladybird’ — which is combined with ‘And All Of Your Dreams’ so powerfully — it adds a beautifully timeless and innocent quality to the song. When did you discover this nursery rhyme?

AM: When I was a child. That rhyme was running through my head for some time, and they just amalgamated themselves into my own lyrics. They worked perfectly with the subject of the song.

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Are there other nursery rhymes or children stories that impacted you growing up as a child?

AM: Actually, I just remembered that when I was about 10 I became crazily fascinated with the origins of nursery rhymes and their actual meanings, and I went to the library to get books out on it, and being from this tiny town, they only had 1 little child’s version of their history, but I managed to get hold of some better ones, and yes, I was really interested in that they had hidden meanings and a history attached to them, so I learned a lot about them then. They are really fascinating.

Stories and poems etc. that come to mind are ‘The Selfish Giant’, actually all of Oscar Wilde’s short stories, and ‘Le Petit Prince’, ‘The Lady of Shalott’ and ‘The Highwayman’.

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One of the most special moments on the album for me is the lyric: “this mask I wear is wounded like the soldier underneath”. The song is like a close relation to ‘Highwaymen in Midnight Masks’ from your last album ‘Winter Lady’, and is equally just as enriching and powerful for the listener. At what stage of the album was this song written?

AM: You’re very connected. 🙂 This song was actually the first song written, it was written a long time ago, not long after ‘Highwaymen’…I think I wrote it a couple of weeks after I got back from the tour through Europe.

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The use of your vocals are so striking across all seven pieces on ‘This Kindly Slumber’ — from the very softly spoken and hushed parts or near spoken-word parts (the verse for ‘Belle de Jour’, for example) to the use of double-tracking on ‘Yesterday’s Stains’ or the stunning rise in your vocals on ‘Stranger’ — your voice creates such a range of tones which elicit so many moods and emotions across the album. Recording your vocal takes must prove challenging at the recording stage of the album?

AM: Well, you may notice some stumbles in my vocals…which, as I mentioned before, I keep because they are the honest emotion, and I don’t want to take that away. Mostly my vocals are the first takes. Thank you so much for your compliments. 🙂

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With repeat listens, ‘This Kindly Slumber’ builds almost a labyrinth or maze whereby the listener navigates their own way out, there’s a darkness present – together with much vulnerability – but there’s ultimately light and hope present too. It’s very rare to experience such a personal journey on an album (for both listener and composer) which has the effect of creating such a moving experience.
I suppose ‘Yesterday’s Stains’ would be a darker part to the album, there’s such an openness and honesty here which is in itself so inspiring on so many different levels. I imagine it must be very difficult writing a piece such as ‘Yesterday’s Stains’?

AM: I think maybe writing a very personal song is the easy part, because it’s something that needs to be done. It’s there, and it needs to come out or something. It’s making it public that might be the difficult part, but that is softened by the hope that it will bring some people who will relate to it in some way, it may bring them some sort of kindred feeling, and some sort of hope.

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I love the cover artwork for ‘This Kindly Slumber’. Again, it reflects and embodies the album, it’s many moods and textures so wonderfully. Could you tell me how the sleeve came to fruition, Alicia?

AM: I had another idea for the cover and Bruno my brother, is an amazing artist, and he is so kind that he draws for me pretty much whatever I ask him. Well, this time, my idea didn’t quite work out, because there were too many bits in it and various other things. So he listened to the album, and he came up with the idea of the cover and explained it to me, and I thought it sounded absolutely perfect. So he went ahead with what he saw in his head, and I’m so happy it happened that way, because he totally got it right on. He created the perfect cover for ‘This Kindly Slumber’.

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What music and reading material did you surround yourself with on the making of ‘This Kindly Slumber’?

AM: If I am in a writing period, I really try to stay away from everything because I need to be in my own space. If I put something on, it’s usually unimposing things like Gregorian chants.

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Since the last time we spoke you also added vocals to The Dale Cooper Quartet & The Dictaphones song ‘Lampyre Bonne Chère’ (taken from their current Denovali LP ‘Quatorze Pièces de Menace’). It’s such a magnificent song and your vocals and Dale Cooper Quartet’s distinctive sound (electric guitars, percussion and strings) is a match made in heaven. What was this collaboration and the process like?

AM: Thank you so much. I loved singing on that song.

They sent me the song, asking if I’d like to sing on it, and I was blown away by its beauty when I heard it. I was really excited to be able to do something with it. So I came up with a melody and lyrics, and recorded it.

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For your recent mixtape you so kindly compiled for us, you chose two tracks by Molly Drake. Her music — as well as Nick Drake’s of course — is clearly very special for you. How would you describe the impact their music has had on you as a songwriter?

AM: I’d say Nick Drake has been very influential for me, in that he brings me to a place where I want to write. In a particularly hard time of my life, when I was younger, Nick Drake’s music was a huge part of my life and I kind of got through my sadness sharing it with the music. So now when I listen to it, it brings back all of those strong feelings and emotions, I suppose.

I just love the fact that Molly existed unknown for so long, and kept writing and recording her beautiful, sweet and sad songs with those insightful lyrics, without any sort of recognition. Obviously something she needed to do, it was her expression, no matter what anyone else thought, and I think that’s so beautiful. It’s also interesting to see a glimmer of how she must have influenced Nick Drake in his own songs.

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What plans do you have in store for 2014, Alicia?

AM: I’m hoping to tour Europe. but it depends on finances…so I don’t know if it will happen yet. And I actually haven’t planned much more, except a few collaborations. 🙂

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‘This Kindly Slumber’ is available now on Denovali Records.

https://www.facebook.com/birdsofpassagemusic
http://denovali.com

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January 27, 2014 at 9:56 am

Step Right Up: Dale Cooper Quartet

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Interview with Dale Cooper Quartet.

“I think — as every creation — your life, place you live, travel, meetings have an evident influence. Maybe it is the windy weather mixed with our landscapes we’re in that got an influence on it. But then, it is more a confluent meeting of three persons.”

—Christophe Mevel, Dale Cooper Quartet

Words: Mark Carry, Illustration: Craig Carry

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Named after a central character in David Lynch’s cult-classic ‘Twin Peaks’ TV series, Dale Cooper Quartet & The Dictaphones create a similarly beguiling atmosphere through their unique blend of dark drone, 50s jazz, soundtrack music and ambient flourishes (at times augmented by heavenly string arrangements). The latest album is the cult-French collective’s follow-up to the acclaimed 2011 album ‘Metamanoir’ (the second release for the German experimental label Denovali). The latest venture, entitled ‘Quatorze Pièces de Menace’, released last September on the ever-formidable Denovali label, was inspired by the live experience of the band and their everlasting love for the local landscapes. The eleven brooding and hypnotic sonic creations captured on ‘Quatorze Pièces de Menace’ reveals an intensity of emotion that uncovers new meaning upon further encounters.

A wonderful cast of musicians guest on ‘Quatorze Pièces de Menace’ that adds new dimensions to the ethereal soundscapes. New Zealand artist (and Denovali label-mate) Alicia Merz (whose Birds Of Passage moniker is responsible for creating utterly captivating worlds of song), adds vocals to the spellbinding album closer ‘Lampyre Bonne Chère’. One of the album’s defining moments is beautifully arrived upon as Merz, close to a whisper, sings “hold my hand again” amidst swirling strings, mournful piano and reverb-drenched guitar tones. The fragile words forms a new horizon of hope and solace, as a tragically beautiful ballad brings Dale Cooper Quartet’s enriching journey to a stunning close.

Elsewhere, guest vocalists include the gifted talents of Zalie Bellacicco (who appeared on the debut ‘Parole de Navarre’), Irish-born Ronan MacErlaine and Gaelle Kerrien (Yann Tiersen). The deep tones of MacErlaine’s voice on ‘Céladon Bafre’ is a joy to behold, as the songbook of Scott Walker comes into full focus. MacErlaine sings “Winter face” continuously over a gentle ripple of minor piano chords on the final verse that brings to mind Frank Sinatra’s ‘Sings For Only The Lonely’. A sense of melancholia permeates the atmosphere, as the piano chords drift by: “The clear hat is gone”. The introspective mood (dominating much of Side B) serves the perfect counterpoint to the opening flurry of experimental noise unleashed by ‘L’escolier Serpent Eolipile’. It is the dynamic range (and indeed, eclectic range of styles) that is most striking about Dale Cooper Quartet’s newest venture.

The dreamy tones of reverb-filled electric guitar serves the opening notes to ‘Ignescence Black-bass Recule’, before a hypnotic drumbeat leads you on a voyage into the heart of darkness. The menacing world of David Lynch is never far away. Later, a seductive double-bass groove creates the rhythmic pulse of the slow-burning, chaos-filled transmission. Moments later, audio recordings of Italian spoken word arrives that heightens the sense of impending doom. The inevitability of disaster, it seems, is a stone’s throw away. The epic album opener ‘Brosme en Dos-vert’ contains looped spoken word fragments, eerie strings and striking ambient pulses beneath a hiss and crackle of vinyl. The middle section evolves into drone of choral bliss as drums and percussion and noise conjures up the sound of The Haxan Cloak. A resolution is found, as the closing section of calming trumpet sounds (think ECM’s back-catalogue) ascends into the air. A vintage sound is masterfully formed.

The eerie piano notes and mesmerising strings of ‘Calbombe camoufle Fretin’ is effortlessly blended with the addition of female vocals. An organic, cohesive whole is this created that is steeped in a strange beauty. The lyric of “Slow is the maker” sung by MacErlaine on the brooding lament ‘Nourrain Quinquet’ resonates powerfully. Undoubtedly, ‘Quatorze Pièces De Menace’s suspense and beauty creates a deeply fascinating experience. From the wintry windswept shores of Brittany, France, Dale Cooper Quartet have created a tragically beautiful opus for each and every one of us to truly savor.

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‘Quatorze Pièces de Menace’ is available now on Denovali Records.

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Interview with Dale Cooper Quartet.

[The Dale Cooper Quartet are: Christophe Mevel, Gael Loison, Yannick Martin]

Congratulations on the stunning new record, ‘Quatorze Pièces De Menace’. The enthralling soundscapes explore a seamless array of genres – jazz, experimental noise, ambient, modern-classical – that captures a mood and atmosphere so vivid, and beguilingly beautiful. Please discuss for me your aims from the outset in recording the follow-up to 2011’s ‘Metamanoir’?

Christophe: Hello, thanks a lot Mark for the kind words. Well, I guess there were no aims but each of us had many ideas to follow. The record is a result as a collective act at a d-day. That’s maybe why we can hear some jazz, improvised, electronic, ambient, written music and many genres that we’re in actually. Metamanoir was very orchestrated and sophisticated sounds, we wanted something more rough in the musical approach maybe closer to the live acts…with the accidents, the length & general mood. We didn’t have any concept before starting the recordings.

Yannick: Thanks, Mark. Except from the first album which had a general aim (to make improvised music inspired by Twin Peaks soundtrack), we just record different parts at several moments (mostly night sessions) and mix the whole stuff. The tone and colour of the last album then appeared during the mixing session and we tried to get back to the simplicity of Parole de Navarre but also have more songs-like tracks.

Gael: We spent a lot of time recording to real instruments and voices to breathe life into sampling materials, making a huge catalog of sounds to choose from when we assemble tracks and songs.

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What I also love about the record are the guest vocalists that appear on ‘Quatorze Pièces De Menace’. The voices add new dimensions and textures to the deeply captivating sonic canvas of the album. Can you please recount for me your memories of first coming across these amazing talents – Alicia Merz, Zalie Ballacicco, Ronan Mac Erlaine and Gaelle Kerrien – and the resulting collaboration that ensued?

Christophe: Oh, each vocalist here have a different story. Concerning Alicia, it’s just a stunning discovery we did because she produces albums on the same stunning label (Denovali). And, she asked us to do a remix of one of her song (with Brother & Sister Moon project) two years ago. It was the first time for us, and a supa’ great surprise we heard her vocals on our universe while working on. We thought it could be a lovely guest on some songs. Particularly these ones. She’s got an incredible voice and way of recording, very rough.
Zalie, was the first vocalist we worked with, now ten years ago; she’s a friend and can work on all the textures she wants, technically a killer! She works regularly with Gael as well on vocals improvised experiences with electronic. Hope it will see the day one day.
Ronan is an Irish-born friend, non-singer until Gael discovered his voice that we really love. 😉 It sounds good with our universe. Gaelle is a very old friend, cos’ we used to start the music together in the early 90’s. Since these days, we’ve always had different projects and bands. For Dale Cooper it was the perfect universe to work together. So, this is it. And there’s always secret singers that we can hear as well. 😉

Yannick: Yes, the vocals are really inspiring to us. We use them as instruments, especially with the girls’ voices. Ronan has a dark tone that fits perfectly with our moody atmosphere too. The other day, we summed up people we would like to hear on our future releases. We’ll probably find other great vocalists as we are quite happy with the 60’s classic songs tracks on the last album. Maybe we would release 4-songs EP on 7″ vinyl record that has to be played on jukebox only. With the scratchy sound included.

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Album closer ‘Lampyre Bonne Chère’ is such a divine sonic creation. The instrumentation of strings, percussion, guitars swirl majestically beneath Alicia Merz’s achingly beautiful vocals. I would love to gain an insight into the construction (or de-construction) of this particular song and the arrangement of ‘Lampyre Bonne Chère’. It’s a fitting close to such a triumphant album.

Christophe: Yes, in this case it’s more a deconstruction. As a final track, we like the idea of a pop song (as on Metamanoir), this one with a classic three basic chords. Then, from this state, we try to make it sound in our universe, we try many possibilities and from all of these we keep the basics, with many silences. We had another a different guide vocal on this one that we did before sending the track to Alicia that she decided to sing it differently and it is just so great, fitting perfectly with these silences. She sent us the track when we were closing the mix of the album. It should have figured on the next album then but it was the track we needed!

Gael: Yes, it is like a final song in a motion picture soundtrack, and we had to mix it in one night.

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My current favourite is the brooding opus ‘Nourrain Quinquet’. The lyric “slow is the maker” resonates powerfully. The song feels it belongs somewhere between the worlds of Scott Walker and GodSpeed You Black Emperor. The saxophone releases a cathartic energy throughout. I would love to learn about the range of instrumentation utilized on the record and indeed, the recording process involved?

Yannick: We sent the mixed track to Ronan who wrote the lyrics. He recorded on his own in Paris and the result was brilliant. I guess the saxophone was the latest part recorded. Krystian flow is now a trademark to our sound and in a couple of takes, the track was completed.

Gael: Philippe’s trumpet plays a big role here too, the song has so many layers, keeping the night feel out of sampled vinyls and real instruments, bass was the last recorded instrument and gives the final structure of the song. We use some vintage microphones and mixers for the way they sound.

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Can you discuss for me the influence your native Brittany, France has had on your music, and how the local landscapes filter into your unique blend of sound?

Christophe: I think — as every creation — your life, place you live, travel, meetings have an evident influence. Maybe it is the windy weather mixed with our landscapes we’re in that got an influence on it. I think you know that in Ireland! But then, it is more a confluent meeting of three persons. Any of us could separately have this sound, ideas and songs.

Yannick: Don’t know if we live in Istanbul the music would be different. I guess Brittany is in us and in our music. But I do think that night and its mysteries run into our sound. And if it is breezy and rainy, maybe it drives our songs to that special atmosphere.

Gael: Rain, seashore, coffee: ideal mood!

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Can you reminisce and talk about watching ‘Twin Peaks’ for the first time. What were your immediate impressions? Do you have favourite episodes? For me, I still remember the profound effect (and shock/suspense!) of seeing Laura Palmer’s father transform into evil; in the living room while a vinyl is being played. I couldn’t think clearly for days afterwards.

Christophe: when I was 18 or something, Saturday night watching. I have an exciting souvenir from this series and period, it was so uncommon at this time, for me, and it stayed the same, I haven’t watched it since this time. So it’s quite a troubled vision, that’s how I want it to stay.

Yannick: Watching ‘Twin Peaks’ means such great memories to me: it was broadcasted on La Cinq (Channel 5), a new channel as there was only 4 TV channels in the 80s. It was really different from the other TV programs. It has nothing to deal with a detective soap with one case/one guilty man. All was mixed up, there were no real head character, no good/evil, just a bunch of weird people. I loved and still love Audrey Horn as she is beautiful, childish, somehow stupid but she seems to be the master of many scenes.

Gael: Yeah, I’ve seen the series back in the 90’s, loved the mood.

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Lastly, I read somewhere that Angelo Badalamenti described his own music as “tragically beautiful”. I think the same description can be used for the incredible works of yours. Are there certain records out there that has served major sources of inspiration for you?

Christophe: Personally, ‘Laughing Stock’ & ‘Spirit Of Eden’ Talk Talk records were a real shock, and stays after all these years. I can still listen to it after a thousand times, every listen is different, it is a majestic and powerful record that got a big influence. It is the reference point for me with the jazz and improvised music I’m working in. And then there could be other hundreds of records, films, people that got an influence…but taking time is the best influence. 😉

Yannick : I listen to a wide range of music. But I guess the records I listened to when we started the Quartet are still somewhere there: Bark Psychosis, Labradford and Flying Saucer Attack.

Gael: I always loved the way Brian Eno talks about music, especially ambient music.

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‘Quatorze Pièces de Menace’ is available now on Denovali Records.

https://www.facebook.com/dalecooperquartet
http://denovali.com

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Fractured Air 07: It’s Too Late Now (A Mixtape by Birds Of Passage)

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To listen on Mixcloud:

http://www.mixcloud.com/Fractured_Air/fractured-air-07-its-too-late-now-a-mixtape-by-birds-of-passage/

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“So I wrote these songs from my heart, touching also on important and terrible sadnesses that are all too common in our world. And there is a little of my fantasies in the album too.” (―Alicia Merz, describing “Winter Lady”)

Birds Of Passage is the alias for New Zealand-based artist Alicia Merz. Each and every one of Birds Of Passage’s heavenly sonic creations possesses this otherworldly dimension that takes you on a captivating journey of the heart. To date Birds Of Passage has released the following albums: “Without The World”, “Dear And Unfamiliar” (with Leonardo Rosado) and last year’s “Winter Lady”.

Denovali’s first release in 2014 will be the new long-awaited third full length album of Birds Of Passage. The album is entitled “This Kindly Slumber” and will be released in the second week of January 2014. The first two tracks will be unveiled by Denovali during December.

Tracklisting

01. Edward Elgar – Enigma – Variations on an original theme Op. 36 – Andante
02. Molly Drake – I Remember
03. Victoria – O Magnum Mysterium
04. Lamp of the Universe – Samsara Born
05. Gorecki – Three Pieces in Old Style – Movement One
06. Loreena McKennitt (words by Shakespeare) – Cymbeline
07. Traditional – Still, Still, Still
08. Molly Drake – Do you Ever Remember?

Fractured Air 07. The universe is making music all the time.

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To listen on Mixcloud:

http://www.mixcloud.com/Fractured_Air/fractured-air-07-its-too-late-now-a-mixtape-by-birds-of-passage/

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For our interview with Alicia Merz, please see HERE.

http://birdsofpassagemusic.com
http://www.denovali.com

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Written by admin

December 3, 2013 at 2:51 pm

Chosen One: Birds Of Passage

with one comment

Interview with Alicia Merz, Birds Of Passage.

“I truly whisper to you.”
—Alicia Merz

Words: Mark Carry, Illustration: Craig Carry

birdsofpassage_alicia_craigcarry

‘Winter Lady’ is the sophomore album from New Zealand artist Alicia Merz, who creates spellbinding music under the Birds of Passage moniker. My introduction to her unique art was this very album; an album of heavenly sonic creations. Each song possesses this otherworldly dimension that takes you on a captivating journey. Alicia Merz’s songs are hauntingly beautiful with emotion-filled cinematic soundscapes. Inside the songs of ‘Winter Lady’, a desolate world is created, which is filled with darkness. A spectrum of emotion; agony, pain, hope, longing, love, breathes deeply into the world of the listener. But in the darkness lies hope. Upon first hearing Birds Of Passage a few months ago, ‘Winter Lady’ soon became a treasured album for me and has been a purveyor of solace and hope ever since.

A masterwork of minimalism is etched all over the current record. Opener ‘Fatal Melody’ contains atmospheric ambient sounds and Alicia’s fragile vocals. “I won’t be the saviour for your fatal melody” is the lyric to the chorus that resonates powerfully into the slipstream of one’s mind. ‘Highway Men In Midnight Masks’ is sublime. The graceful piano notes echoes Erik Satie’s ‘Gymnopedies’. The mesmerizing soundscapes unravel your very being. “Life was never crazier/And I was never lovelier” is a lyric to the verse. ‘Away With The Night’ is a drone/ambient tour de force that recalls Sylvain Chauveau and The Haxan Cloak. The reverb-drenched instrumentation builds and builds, providing one of ‘Winter Lady”s emotional climaxes. Alicia’s vocals are breathtaking; “search my body for scars” paints a darkness yet the ambient sphere that forever surrounds provides eternal light. Album closer ‘Waltz While We Sleep’ is my personal favourite. As the title suggests, this beautiful ballad is a waltz for longing where everlasting hope shines through the harrowing of “darkest night”. There is rarely a song that resonates such emotion as ‘Waltz While We Sleep’. The result is quite staggering. Alicia’s voice hangs delicately in the clouds of sound long after the music fades into the horizon, “Touch me I’m the crippled bride of fear/Hold me and my winter fingers disappear.”

Sing a song of whispers
Unraveled in all of my troubled skin
Interpret all of my dreaming
Before they begin

‘Away With The Night’, taken from Birds of Passage ‘Winter Lady’.

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birdsofpassage_craigcarry

Interview with Alicia Merz.

Congratulations Alicia on your truly inspiring music. The ‘Winter Lady’ album introduced me to your work. An album of such heavenly art. Your songs possess this otherworldly dimension that takes you on a captivating journey. The songs are hauntingly beautiful with emotion filled cinematic soundscapes.

Mark, thank you so much for your kind words and appreciation 🙂 you are too too kind 🙂

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Tell me please about the album ‘Winter Lady’? There is a desolate world created filled with darkness. A spectrum of emotion breathes deeply into the world of the listener. But in the darkness, hope lies inside the beautiful melodies, especially the album closer ‘Waltz While We Sleep’.

Your description is what I always wish my music may bring forth to the listener! You are a beautiful audience, someone who really understands my music. I always want there to be that glimmer of hope because I write from the dark place that many people are in, but I want to try and be able to help them out of that place, even if it is by just being with them in the darkness so they know they are not alone. I never know whether people actually feel anything close to what I hope my songs bring, but I have some hope now, given your words.

When I was a teenager I used to lie in the darkness of my room and the sadness of my soul, and be enveloped by whatever despairing music it was I was playing loudly. Feeling that kindred feeling that I was not alone in my dark somehow would help me. This is what I wanted for Winter Lady.

So I wrote these songs from my heart, touching also on important and terrible sadnesses that are all too common in our world. And there is a little of my fantasies in the album too.

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I’d love to get an insight into ‘Winter Lady’ and the journey it means for you, please?

Winter Lady is the icy girl who has learned to be wary, cold and bitter, among other things (fatal melody, away with the night, hollow) by the experiences she has been forced to endure (disaster of dreams, the monster inside you).

But she is still full of deep love and excitement, imagination and fantasy, and she also tells you her secrets (highwaymen in midnight masks, waltz while we sleep). I wrote what I needed to write at the time, I guess I may have been, may still be, somewhat of a winter lady.

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Where does your inspiration lie?

Usually it is in extreme elements, particularly cold and dreary, or stormy days. Or beautiful ones. Sometimes it is from reading a beautiful piece of writing by someone like Longfellow or Robert frost. These things mix with my experiences and emotions and then I can sometimes write something worth keeping.

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The song ‘Waltz While We Sleep’ is heartbreakingly beautiful. It feels like a prayer, a lullaby. Your voice is so delicate and fragile. The piano meanders slowly like a river of tears, beneath this cinematic backdrop. Please tell me about this song please?

Thank you for the beautiful description 🙂
That song was the last song I wrote before I put all of Winter Lady together. It is the conclusion. Winter Lady’s final words about everything, where she tells you the most of her secrets and bares herself more than ever.

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How do you capture the intimacy in your songs? This is what immediately took me aback listening to your music.

I truly whisper to you.

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I’d love to know more about the artwork? The illustrations capture the emotion of  Winter Lady’s fragile world. 

The cover is based on Charles Keeping’s illustrations of The Highwayman poem by Alfred Noyes. My song Highwaymen in Midnight Masks was inspired by this poem (& also Loreena McKennitt’s setting to music of it). I have always been fascinated by the poem and highwaymen ever since I was a little girl looking at that book.

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What was Nils Frahm’s input to the album in his role of mastering?

He made it sound sooooooooooooo much better! I don’t know how. I am very privileged to have had him master it for me.

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I recently read you have a new album that is near completion. It’s wonderful news. Can you shed some light on this new work?

I am hoping to finish it in early 2013. I haven’t got much to tell about it sorry. But I hope you will like it as you do Winter Lady 🙂

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What music inspires you?

Nick Drake, Gorecki, Leonard Cohen, Loreena McKennitt, many others.

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‘Winter Lady’ by Birds Of Passage is out now.

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http://birdsofpassagemusic.com
https://soundcloud.com/birdsofpassagemusic
http://birdsofpassage.bandcamp.com

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Written by admin

January 12, 2013 at 3:26 pm