FRACTURED AIR

The universe is making music all the time

Posts Tagged ‘Actress

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S02E09 | September mix

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Australian-born composer and songwriter Carla dal Forno’s eagerly-anticipated new material comes in the form of “The Garden”, a 12” for UK’s Blackest Ever Black, due for release on October 6th and folow-up to her sublime debut full-length “You Know What It’s Like”. Dal Forno is also a member of the trio F ingers (alongside Samuel Karmel and Tarquin Manek) who release their second LP, “Awkwardly Blissing Out”, this month. Recorded in Melbourne and Berlin between 2015–17, the album is the follow-up to the trio’s 2015 debut album “Hide Before Dinner”. Dal Forno’s own mixes (originally made for Berlin Community Radio while residing in the German capital; she now compiles monthly hour-long shows for NTS Radio) are always an indispensable source for music (Circuit 7’s “Eastern Dreams” from our September mixtape is one such example).

The forever-inspiring Chicago-based artist Circuit des Yeux (Haley Fohr) releases her magnificent fifth studio album “Reaching For Indigo” on U.S. independent Drag City on 20th October. Unveiled so far is the mesmerising new single “Black Fly” which confirms Fohr as one of independent music’s most singular voices and fascinating contemporary music-makers.

Anthology Recordings – Mexican Summer’s reissue imprint – release the majestic compilation “Feel The Music Vol. 1” next month. Compiled by Paul Major – pioneering record dealer and frontman of the band Endless Boogie – this truly special record effortlessly spans sounds and styles (folk, psychedelia, blues, rock n roll) while unearthing a plethora of truly unique (and largely unknown to wider audiences) songwriters from a golden age of music.

September’s mix also features new releases from possibly the year’s most anticipated pair of albums which come courtesy of both Four Tet (“New Energy”, Text) and Godspeed You! Black Emperor (Constellation). Electronic maestro Four Tet and his monumental “New Energy” album (available via his Text imprint from 29th September); Montréal’s mythical Godspeed You! Black Emperor unleash their sublime seventh album “Luciferian Towers” via Constellation which confirm the band (as if confirmation was ever necessary) as one of the world’s most ceaselessly innovative and breathtaking bands.

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S02E08 | August mix

 

To listen on La Blogothèque:

http://www.blogotheque.net/2017/09/29/fractured-air-x-blogotheque-s02e09-september-mix/

 

01. Godspeed You! Black Emperor“Fam/Famine” (Constellation)
02. Dungen“Achmed Flyger” (Version 1) (Versions by Prins Thomas) (Smalltown Supersound)
03. James Holden & The Animal Spirits“Each Moment Like The First” (Border Community)
04. Circuit des Yeux“Black Fly” (Drag City)
05. Forest Swords“Raw Language” (Ninja Tune)
06. Yasuaki Shimizu“Seiko 1” (Crammed Discs)
07. Ariel Pink“Feels Like Heaven” (Mexican Summer)
08. The Smiths“The Hand That Rocks The Cradle” (Rough Trade)
09. Arthur Russell“Get Around To It” (Rough Trade, Audika)
10. Nausea“No Conversation” (Ecstatic)
11. Circuit 7“Eastern Dreams” (Minimal Wave)
12. Carla dal Forno“The Garden” (Blackest Ever Black)
13. Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith“To Feel Your Best” (Western Vinyl)
14. Richard Horowitz“Eros Never Stops Dreaming” (RVNG Intl)
15. F Ingers“Your Confused” (Blackest Ever Black)
16. Geinoh Yamashirogumi“Kaneda” (Akira OST, Milan)
17. Sanza“Sounout” (Original Mix) (Music For Dreams)
18. Burial“Rodent” (Hyperdub)
19. Four Tet“Scientists” (Text)
20. Actress & London Contemporary Orchestra“Audio Track 5” (Ninja Tune)
21. Carmen Villain“Red Desert” (Smalltown Supersound)
22. Blue Iverson“Who Shot Lucious Lyon?” (Self-Released)
23. Darius“I Feel The Need To Carry On” (Anthology Recordings)
24. Bill Mackay & Ryley Walker“Dragonfly” (Drag City)
25. Ry Cooder“I Knew These People” (excerpt) (Paris Texas OST, Warner Bros.)
26. Sun Kil Moon“Si, Paloma” (Caldo Verde)

Compiled by Fractured Air, September 2017. The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.

http://www.blogotheque.net/
https://fracturedair.com/

Chosen One: Moiré

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Interview with Moiré.

or maybe it’s going to be something totally different because it’s meant to be about the new music; that for me is what techno has always meant.”

Moiré

Words: Mark Carry

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London-based producer Moiré continues his remarkable output on his latest full-length ‘No Future’, recently released on the prestigious Ghostly label. The gifted producer has continually evolved with a string of captivating blissed-out techno and synth odysseys (beginning with 2013 debut EP ‘Never Sleep’ via Actress’s Werkdiscs label) and ‘No Future’ sees Moiré exploring further and deeper into realms of deeply engaging and compelling techno explorations.

Of course, ceaseless lines are beautifully blurred amidst Moiré’s masterful songcraft from the utterly transcendent ambient bliss of album closer ‘Auteur (Outro)’ (whose heavenly cosmic synth patterns feel could loop forever) to the hypnotic acid house of ‘Jupiter’ and deeply-affecting soulful hip-hop (DRS is the trusted MC for two sublime cuts ‘No Future’ and ‘Bootleg’). Elements of dubstep and grime are dotted across the James Messiah guested opus ‘Facade’. ‘No Future’ is a reflection on humanity wherein a dystopian vision burns through the embers of fear, pain and doubt. The mantra of “fallen angel” echoes powerfully across the thumpy bass and gauzing synths of ‘Bootleg’.

“Techno music has always been about new music” reiterates Moiré. In many ways, revisiting ‘No Future’ serves a fitting parallel alongside  the enigmatic UK artist Actress, who similarly crafts singular, shape-shifting works. The trippy ‘Opium’ and Afrobeat rhythms of ‘Magma Dream’ supply yet more neon-filled rapturous dance music. The perfect come-down arrives on the final two cuts: the introspective and multi-layered hazy ambient tour-de-force ‘System 100’ and the forever evolving musical patterns of ‘Auteur’ waltzes, mutates and dazzles.

‘No Future’ is out now on Ghostly.

https://www.facebook.com/MoireMusic

https://www.facebook.com/ghostly/

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Interview with Moiré.

 

Congratulations on the new album ‘No Future’, which is really quite incredible. Please discuss the making of the new record? I mean you’re very prolific with an array of wonderful releases under  your belt, I wonder when did you begin working on ‘No Future’ and the ideas you had for this latest set?

Moiré: Making music is probably the starting point when I did my first album on my first record because I think once you start you want to continue. ‘No Future’ for me is just a continuation of something I wanted to do from the start. And when I finished my first album and then I did some gigs and I toured and then I did maybe another single or two and then there was time to do another album because suddenly there was so much material to work with that I decided it’s time to make another record (in a technical way). I don’t just go and make music like ‘Today I’m going to make an album’, it didn’t happen that way it’s a more organic and natural process of making something like that. So it was inspired by everything that was happening in my personal life during that time and then it coincided with what was happening in the country in the UK and the announcement of all sorts of political changes that will be happening and then of course the changes that were starting to happen in America. That combined with my life situation and my family situation and some other things created in my head the need to have to finish the record; now is the time because I have the reason to make it, I have the reason to express myself in that way. And so that’s how it started and that’s where it started.

And then I mean the process is I’m sure as you know it’s quite a lengthy procedure. I like to take my time to make sure the tracks or whatever that is I release are the ones that I want. I mean there’s millions of versions of each track probably and you’re getting to the point where you’re doing two hundred versions of the same track and then you’re like ‘OK, actually I think the first version was the best’ and so the process is very long sometimes. But sometimes the tracks just happen, you know there’s certain ideas, certain sketches, certain experimentations, certain emotional expression, or sometimes I feel bad and I’ll go to the studio and make a track or sometimes I actually create a composition where there’s little planning and sometimes there’s a lot of planning into the making of music, I mean it really depends. As I say, I see this as an art form rather than like a session musician going in and doing a job. So, millions of hours in the studio; loads of nights and loads of days. My studio doesn’t have any windows, it’s quite a secluded environment and quite isolated in that sense so I was just on my own for a year with music basically and that’s the effect of it.

As you describe perfectly that’s exactly as a listener you feel as you hear the tracks, there’s just that outpour of everything that you put into the work because it’s fascinating the multitude of layers and moments within each song.

Moiré: That’s always been my thing. I mean I understand what journalists and the industry are always trying to put certain sounds to a certain box so they can tick the box and this is that or this is this. And for me, the music which of course has elements of techno and house in it and ambient and all sorts of things but that’s the thing it has everything because I think of just making music so I’m not going to limit myself to one particular sound or one particular concept. And also that was always for me the main idea behind techno – or any techno-related ideas – was that this was meant to be about new music, not the genre thing that established itself as this one particular type of dance music but actually for me that was never the point; the point was that it was maybe going to be dance or maybe it won’t be, maybe it would be experimental music or maybe it’s going to be something totally different because it’s meant to be about the new music; that for me is what techno has always meant. Or any kind of electronic music for that matter was always like ‘So what I’m going to make the next record and the next record’ is meant to be some sort of evolution; I should be trying new things. That in a way is my obligation as an artist that is engaging with music and trying music and being allowed to make music, to actually give music something back in terms of giving music some justice and some time of the day that actually I feel very lucky that I am able to do and release records.

In a way I don’t like it easy but also I feel like it’s so important, maybe not now but in ten or twenty years someone is going to find this record will be like ‘Oh this is a really interesting record’ and that’s how I discovered a lot of stuff that I’ve been inspired by that just now are getting the recognition after decades of being hidden. And I think that’s my attitude; it’s just basically art. I know it’s  a club music that maybe people are going to dance to it but I never think about it that much. Of course there are these elements that are driving the tracks forward and that there is this constant step and I am always trying to see what’s underneath the classic conventions that we have or industry trends.

Someone earlier today asked me would I be willing to have tracks with no beats or something like that and I thought about it and basically it’s like maybe why not but that shouldn’t really be a conversation, that should be left to the artist to decide I feel like there is an industry push towards certain things to be like ‘OK this season we’re going to do ambient and next season we’re going to do noise and next season we’re going to do new wave’ and it’s pretty much all the same but we’re just going in loops in terms of what’s trendy or what should be done. So, I’m just trying to look in music and tracks and give them as much passion and artistic approach as I can and I guess that’s what you’re talking about and I hope this somehow comes out when you listen to it.

I love the flow to ‘No Future’ as well and the sequencing. For example the closing track ‘Auteur (Outro)’ and its construction and the different sub-sections within it brings everything to a fitting close.

Moiré: Thanks. Yeah, I think it’s interesting how the sequence works on people differently. I don’t know how many people are aware but it’s really like the biggest headache; one thing is to make the track and the other thing is to sequence the tracks if you have several of them, so it makes sense. It’s always the biggest problem like which track will be first and especially with this  kind of abstract concept of vocals on techno beats and the trouble of course for everyone is who is Moire and what is the music and what are the beats and I think it’s like unfortunately because the way things are it’s really difficult sometimes to get it to people because you’re going to be classified as experimental or leftfield dance or whatever.

But I remember when I was growing up in the 90’s and when drum & bass happened in the UK and then in Europe, nobody knew how to dance to it; people leaving the floors, they didn’t know what to do, they didn’t know how to classify this at all. And then fast forward ten years later and it’s like the biggest export from the UK after punk or actually the UK ever had. It’s weird how long it takes for things to break but not in a pop sense but more in terms of having people react to the sounds and compositions and new ideas. It doesn’t have to always be dance and it doesn’t have to be always dancing, just being together in a space and listening to music to be the whole thing. But that’s how the album happened and that’s what my approach was to it.

And of course when I was finishing it everything that I thought would happen in terms of the political changes happened and it was funny because when I spoke with the guys from Ghostly about the current president in America, nobody really thought it would happen. I’m quite socially aware, I come from a standard working class family – even in some standards I would say lower than working class – and I think I understand the basic person and what drives them to make certain decisions and also looking on the politics, I’m quite into it because if affects my life and it affects everyone else’s lif e so I decided that maybe I should engage with it a little bit more and try to understand what’s happening. So this was weird because I called the album ‘No Future’ before any of these things were obvious and then it happened and it was like I didn’t really mean it to be negative or pessimistic in any way. And that’s why the music is not really dark or really depressing because that was never the reason for it to be depressing, it was more about being different and the hinting of something.

The guests who are on the album works so wonderfully and even in terms of where they come in on the album too, the two tracks by DRS are outstanding.

Moiré: Yeah, he did an excellent job and also James Messiah was a totally different thing (in terms of the style) but again he fit perfectly with his message. I  just gave him hints – and with DRS as well – I didn’t have to do any like crazy description of telling them what to do. These collaborations I am very happy about them, they just happened so naturally and it was a really good time just to work with them even over email it was just like ‘click’, they got the vibe and I think that’s when you appreciate how professional people are. How some people basically have that amazing quality of being able to jump on any track and deliver something interesting, I’m really into that.

I’m very curious to know about your equipment and the musical set-up that you’re using?

Moiré: Well the studio I had for this – and I’m still renting – is not my studio but it’s someone else’s who put a lot of work into it. It’s a really amazing room with double walls and it’s kind of a floating box, no windows and it sounds really good. So any imperfections or perfections can be heard and you could be really close to the sound. The room is great and the acoustic treatments is basically excellent and then the speakers actually came with the studio. I used to work in Adams before and on this record these are the speakers that I used. One thing is producing and I go quite often and listen in many different places so at home I have Adams and Dynaudio monitors and then in another place I have a bigger Adams system that I would go and ask my friends if I could use and listen to stuff and then in the studio the speakers that are there I think are Focal CMS65 and they were great. On the back of the room –it’s really clever – other speakers like really bad ones like Mackies, you just listen on the really bad ones as well. So it’s all very compact but perfect. For the vocals of course I made the beats and all the sketches and the MCs would do their thing on them, for example DRS did everything from the internet, I just sent him the beat and he sent me the vocals; it was as simple as that. DRS is based in Manchester so obviously there was a distance issue so email was the best thing. James Messiah is based in south London so he just came on his bike and he just recorded it live over the ‘Facade’ track and that was it. I think we actually did also vocal on ‘Jupiter’ as well but I never finished that, so basically they did their thing.

A lot of the tracks themselves are made live with samplers, a bunch of synths (Moog Nord and JD 800 and Octatrack sampler) and loads of other little synths and boxes that are placked together and I just jam on it until I’m happy with the stuff and then it’s all getting recorded live to old Logic, I still like the old one and so for some reason I’m still using that. And then for production I use Universal Audio, I think their tools are really excellent. It’s all very simple, I don’t have any expensive gear in terms of like crazy compressers that you can see some famous people with and stuff like that, I cannot afford it, I do not have stuff like that [laughs]. I just learned to work with what I have, I mean that was always my concept because as much there is talk about analog versus digital and so on, everyone who makes music knows that even if they’re going to use all the analog gear they’re going to end up having a digital file delivered for mastering and a mastering engineer quite often will use a PC to master it. You can record stuff to tape but it will always go through digital, I mean you will need to have the tape machine and record the tape and then deliver the tape if that’s the sound you’re after. And that fact that we’re dealing with the digital file in my head was always meaning that you can sculpt it the way you want.

The ways you record it are important for me and that’s why having Universal Audio and analog plugins is quite cool and I wish I had some of the hardware but I think for me that’s fine, I like the way it sounds and I like the quality of digital plugins as much as anything else. I may be quite unusual in terms of the way I use this, which is difficult to explain because my whole concept of making music is like obviously pretty much everyone has the same tools and studios are very similar because by default it’s a pair of monitors and some gear but it’s about how you wire stuff and how you plug things and what triggers what and how you play it and this is something that you cannot explain and that’s something that takes time to develop and I think that for everyone is going to be a different process and some people care about certain things and some people don’t like everything is super-tight whereas other people will leave a but of space for loose swing and maybe not accurately cut beats because that’s the idea. Some people record everything live and I do a lot of stuff live, a lot of the tracks happened just as live jams and I would have parts played from a sampler and then parts played from live synth and other synths sequenced together and then everything going through some distortion box and then everything recorded. So that’s pretty much the technical side of how this happened but I think the room is very important for me, the way it sounds for this particular one was important but who knows maybe on the next one I will do just on headphones.

For the live show – and live jams – there must always be new workings and new versions of the various tracks being formed?

Moiré: Yeah, this is true that is happening. I mean for the live aspect of course it allows you to be constantly doing versions and edits and all sorts of things and experiments. My live stage set-up which I’m building right now – but I’ve already played like this for a while – is that I’m trying to bring as much studio gear to the stage as possible. So I’m trying to do what I’m doing in the studio live basically to an extent because you cannot do everything. And there’s certain things you cannot do because it won’t work but that’s the concept and I always loved that; bringing some machines, some toys to the stage and doing edits of the tracks tha have been released. And obviously when you play for the crowd you can also try new stuff and it’s great to do that so you’re not just stuck to doing DJ, you can actually do something else and every show can be different as well.

I was very interested to read on the Ghostly page that Philip K. Dick and his sci-fi stories and the inspiration this had on ‘No Future’?

Moiré: I like this books and I like his dystopian visions. The phenomenal thing about Philip K. Dick is that if you read his books; they’re portraying us moving to mars and all sorts of other things like ‘The Man in the High Castle’ and even if you look on the cover of this book and the American flag and the way it’s portrayed and everything. And the ideas he had; he was predicting a lot of the things that are happening right now and potentially he was predicting a lot of the things that will happen in the future. I mean the ‘Martian Time-Slip’ is this little novel describing our life on mars but some of his books were crazy bonkers like really proper sc-fi but this stuff you read it now and you think we are not so far from it and it’s possible that we are going to do that and there’s actually nothing that futuristic about it anymore. It’s quite funny, us setting up a place in mars, I think we are quite near to doing that and it’s very political as well, they had NATO on mars and all sorts of other things and you’re like, yeah NATO can be on mars, why not? All these kinds of things and issues and problems that actually he was at time writing it he was reflecting the current world problems in his books partly as well like whatever wars were happening on the planet and transforming this to another planet and the same happening, to be more interesting rather than just describing the reality. He’s definitely incredible and I love his work.

As a producer and someone who has so much music in your life, I wonder growing up at what point did you realize you would go down the path of making music yourself?

Moiré: That’s a difficult question. I don’t know, I mean I can only remember when I was growing up when I was a kid I wanted to be in a band and I forced my parents to buy me a guitar and then after a while I was like well maybe the guitar isn’t for me so I think I destroyed that guitar or I did something to it but whilst I was doing it I had a cassette tape deck and I was just recording all the noises of that guitar destruction and I was basically sampling myself doing all this banging as a kid on that tape and not because I had any concept of sampling – I don’t know if sampling was something that was happening – but I was just doing it because I wanted to listen to it myself [laughs]. I was curious about how it’s going to sound if I was going to do this or if I’m going to do that and obviously recording on the tape allowed you to listen to it back and I didn’t loop or anything, I didn’t understand any of these concepts, I was just always into making noise and making something with sound.

And I wanted to be in a band and I was in a band with my friends and we played some punk stuff and all sorts of things. I was always into music like I mean just as a fan buying all sorts of stuff and I was into all sorts of things and also feeling that I always wanted to be a performer because I started doing nights as a promoter with my friends during university and all this kind of stuff and booking bigger DJs to come and play at our parties and then I started opening and being a DJ as well a little bit at the beginning and then my other friends asked me to collaborate with them on some projects. It evolved in that way so in a way to answer your question I was always into it, I was always in it unconsciously, I was following the path and in my case some things happened that pushed me further in that direction and I still do not understand to be honest how some things happen that you do not have control over like OK I’m going to do this now.

There were some other opportunities or I had to do some other work or other directions in my life and suddenly something happened and they disappeared and it’s like OK I think I should be doing music or I should be working with these people. In my case a few things happened like that in life that were really dramatic that in a way I was like OK this is what I am doing or more like I have to do this in a way that I wanted to do it but also life puzzled itself that way. And it’s always been complicated but I guess that’s why my music has a certain attitude and certain abstract concept behind it because it reflects some of the things I go through. So that’s how it all evolved from my early days, it was not always that obvious and it’s still maybe not that obvious even today, I mean I guess anyone can sit there and ask themselves a question ‘Should I be making music?’ I know that people today are growing up thinking like ‘Fuck it, I’m going to be a DJ and I’m going to buy a bunch of techno tracks from Detroit and I’m going to be a DJ’ and a lot of people do that – or electro or whatever that is in a shop – and some of them probably have bigger careers than many other people who are making music. But it’s crazy because if you look at what happened with the digital social medium and how it changed everything.

Someone asked me ‘Is it difficult for people today in the music industry to go forward?’ and if I look on my profile – like some shitty Instagram account or something – every second person that follows me has got a soundcloud account, that says it all; that means that millions of people are doing the same thing and obviously it’s just going to be affecting everyone else and everyone’s going to be affecting each other basically. But that’s the thing it’s always been the path that has been in front of me, I was not planning or I did not have a business plan like I’m going to make millions of dollars making lots of crazy records or something. The thing for me was always like I am expressing myself and I’m going to try to do my best and be the best in the area that I want to be; that’s my goal and I’m still on my way.

Have there been certain records that you’ve been listening to lately?

Moiré: It’s always the most difficult question. There is just loads. Recently I really like these guys Worried About Satan, they’re quite cool. Pye Corner Audio makes some interesting tracks; I heard some of those from a documentary which was cool. I mean there is so much stuff, I’m always going to be listening to any type of jazz stuff; any Coltrane…anything. I always love Moondog, Flying Lotus. The major inspiration was when Actress released his first record – that was great – and that showed that there is a possibility with the music in that kind of fashion. I just listen daily to so many things, loads of old hip-hop as well like Casual, Hieroglyphics, Wu Tang and Mobb Deep and sometimes I come back to these records because I think they’re just so incredible; they had some magic in them like the fire of the new act where there was really no compromise but just really, really well done. And this kind of interesting movements or moments, there isn’t much of it unfortunately at the moment, it’s really difficult to find these kind of acts where they are interesting musically but there is also some movement behind it and I think everything is watered down based on hype, not much of content really. But there are loads of great records out there.

‘No Future’ is out now on Ghostly.

https://www.facebook.com/MoireMusic

https://www.facebook.com/ghostly/

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May 4, 2017 at 8:01 pm

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S02E03 | March mix

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fracturedair_march17

For March’s mixtape we are excited to share two exclusive tracks, by Reykjavík-based composer Valgeir Sigurðsson (Iceland/Bedroom Community) and Berlin-based percussionist and drummer Andrea Belfi (Italy/Float).

Valgeir Sigurðsson releases his hugely anticipated new solo work “Dissonance” (the follow-up to 2013’s mesmerising “Architecture Of Loss” LP) on April 21st via Icelandic independent label Bedroom Community (founded by Sigurðsson in 2006). Recorded and produced between September 2015 and November 2016 at his Reykjavík-based Greenhouse Studios, “Dissonance” confirms Sigurðsson as one of contemporary music’s most gifted and innovative composers in the modern classical realm. “Dissonance” features collaborators Liam Byrne and Reykjavík Sinfonia and features the monumental side-long title-track alongside two separate suites: “No Nights Dark Enough” (in five parts) and the three-part “1875”.

The Italian-born and Berlin-based artist Andrea Belfi releases his sublime full-length “Ore” – excitingly the first for Float – which comprises his finely-honed craft as a gifted drummer and percussionist, using his own trusted sound set-up (a Saari drum-kit from Finland and a Nord modular and sampler). In recent times, Belfi’s name has reached a wider audience while collaborating and touring with the Nils Frahm-led, Berlin-based three-piece Nonkeen (R&S Records). “Ore” will be released on 26 May 2017 via Float.

Numero Group – the ever-indispensable archival and reissue specialists – this month issued the definitive double-album retrospective on The Creation, the short-lived but hugely influential 1960’s mod-rock group. Entitled “Action Painting”, the double-album set features the complete Creation studio recordings as well as tracks from The Creation’s predecessors, The Mark Four (featuring future Kinks bassist John Dalton).

March’s mix also features new releases from: Colin Stetson; Feist; Nathan Fake; Forest Swords; The Shins; Spoon; Demen and Kelly Lee Owens.

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S02E03 | March mix

 

To listen on La Blogothèque:

http://www.blogotheque.net/2017/03/29/fractured-air-x-blogotheque-s02e03-march-mix/

 


01. Nick Cave & Warren Ellis“Mars Theme” (Mars OST, Milan)
02. Andrea Belfi“Lead” (Float)
03. Blanck Mass“Rhesus Negative” (Sacred Bones)
04. Moiré“Auteur (Outro)” (Ghostly International)
05. Lusine“Witness” (feat. Benoît Pioulard) (Ghostly International)
06. Earthen Sea“About That Time” (Kranky)
07. Demen “Niorum” (Kranky)
08. Ben Frost“Impossibilities” (Fortitude OST, SATV Publishing Limited/Sky, Mute)
09. Valgeir Sigurðsson“No Nights Dark Enough II. infamy sings” (Bedroom Community)
10. Feist“Pleasure” (Polydor)
11. The Creation“Through My Eyes” (Numero Group)
12. Spoon“Us” (Matador)
13. The Shins“The Fear” (Columbia)
14. Ennio Morricone“Un Uomo Da Rispettare” (Un Uomo Da Rispettare OST, Superior Viaduct)
15. High Plains“Blood That Ran the Rapids” (Kranky)
16. Kelly Lee Owens “Lucid” (Smalltown Supersound)
17. Forest Swords“The Highest Flood” (Ninja Tune)
18. Nathan Fake“HoursDaysMonthsSeasons” (Ninja Tune)
19. Colin Stetson“In the clinches” (Constellation)
20. Actress“X22RME” (Ninja Tune)
21. FKA Twigs “Hide” (Young Turks)
22. Todd Terje“Jungelknugen” (Four Tet Remix) (Olsen Norway)
23. Peaking Lights“Little Flower” (Two Flowers)
24. Risco Connection“Ain’t No Stopping Us Now” (Soul Jazz)
25. Madlib“Cue 4” (Stones Throw)
26. Little Simz“No More Wonderland” (AGE 101)
27. Rusangano Family“Eyedentity” (Self-Released)

Compiled by Fractured Air, March 2017. The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.

http://www.blogotheque.net/
https://fracturedair.com/