FRACTURED AIR

The universe is making music all the time

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Mixtape: Fractured Air – December 2018

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fracturedair_dec18

As the dusk light begins to fade on the year, we have a chance to both reflect on these past twelve months and look forward to what awaits us in 2019…Needless to say, music shapes pretty much everything that has taken place – and what moments are about to occur – from memorable, transcendent live shows (Low, Julia Holter and Nils Frahm’s shows will forever stay with me); making new musical discoveries (for instance, first hearing the illuminating voice of Penelope Trappes’ latest record or the myriad of timbres and textures contained on the Actress & LCO collaborative release ‘LAGEOS’); revisiting bands from previous decades (This Mortal Coil’s discography immediately comes to mind) or just simply having a cherished record (or playlist) as the soundtrack to your day (as you walk around in the pools of your mind or take in a nice scenic road-trip).

The importance of music never fades and isn’t that the most amazing thing? There is a science behind it: the reaction as your ears first hears a note and how you feel as a result. And whatever year we find ourselves in (2019, 2020 or beyond), new discoveries will always await us. As a listener, there is some comfort in this simple fact…
Lots of our favourite albums from 2018 are dotted across this December mixtape (and so many left out, as always is the way). The fresh and dynamic ambient sounds of Kranky debut signees (Less Bells and Saloli); Mary Jane Leach’s incredible flute compositions; two tracks from Julia Holter’s epic masterwork ‘Aviary’ and a recent discovery of the incredible Carola Baer (a retrospective compilation is lovingly compiled by Concentric Circles).

Also present is one of the late great composer Jóhann Jóhannsson’s last recorded works: the deeply moving and transporting ‘Mandy’ score, such transformative guitar-based compositions. This year we lost a true voice in today’s music world. I can only imagine the unbearable loss it has been for all those close to this remarkable human being. I remember shaking Jóhann’s hand after a concert of his and just saying how amazing his music is. He smiled graciously and replied softly, “thank you”. Well, thank you Jóhann for the eternal gift your stunningly beautiful music forever brings.

 

Fractured Air – December 2018

01. Tom Waits“Alice” (Epitaph)
02. Actress & LCO“Voodoo Posse, Chronic Illusion” (Ninja Tune)
03. Phase II“Words From” (Definitive Jux)
04. Squarepusher“Lambic Poetry 5” (Warp)
05. Low“Fly” (Sub Pop)
06. Penelope Trappes“Connector” (Houndstooth)
07. Jóhann Jóhannsson“Mandy Love Theme” (Mandy OST, Lakeshore/Invada)
08. Tomita“Dawn Chorus” (RCA)
09. Julia Holter“Voce Simul” (Domino)
10. Alice Coltrane“Keshawa Murahara” (Luaka Bop)
11. Saloli“Anthem” (Kranky)
12. Carola Baer“Maker of Me” (Concentric Circles)
13. Mark Renner“It Might Have Been” (RVNG Intl)
14. Die Haut“Der Karbische Western” (Strut)
15. Paul de Jong“Johnny No Cash” (Temporary Residence)
16. Michele Mercure“A Little Piece” (Freedom To Spend)
17. Carla dal Forno“Blue Morning” (self-released)
18. Less Bells“Valentine” (Kranky)
19. Jessica Moss“Fractals (Truth 3)” (Constellation)
20. Villagers“A Trick of the Light” (Bibio Remix) (Domino)
21. Nils Frahm“A Place” (Erased Tapes)
22. The Gentleman Losers“Fish Roam in Winter Water” (Sound In Silence)
23. Mary Jane Leach“Downland’s Tears” (Modern Love)
24. Julia Holter“I Would Rather See” (Domino)
25. Mary Lattimore“Hello From the Edge of the Earth” (Ghostly)

Wishing our readers a very happy Christmas and best wishes for the new year.

 

 

Albums of the year: 2018

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Presented here is a list of our favourite (ten) albums from 2018. As difficult a task as this proved, we decided ultimately to choose the albums that we found ourselves turning back to time and again over the last twelve months. 

 

10. Earl Sweatshirt – “Some Rap Songs” (Columbia Records)

somerap-correct

Thebe Neruda Kgositsile, otherwise known as Earl Sweatshirt is a rapper, producer and DJ whose third studio album ‘Some Rap Songs’ was released last month to universal acclaim. The sublime hip hop voyage deals – in part – with the loss of his father, poet laureate Keorapetse Kgositsile.

“Me and my dad had a relationship that’s not uncommon for people to have with their fathers, which is a non-perfect one,” Earl wrote. “Talking to him is symbolic and non-symbolic, but it’s literally closure for my childhood. Not getting to have that moment left me to figure out a lot with my damn self.”

On the opening verse of the seductive dub groove ‘Shattered Dreams’, Sweatshirt asks “Why ain’t nobody tell  me I was bleedin’?” Masterful production and sun-blissed harmonies serve the rich ebb and flow of the cut’s gradual flow. The rapper pleads “Please, nobody pinch me out this dream” beneath the dreamy, hypnotic beats on the following line.

Memories of his father permeates throughout the lucid ‘Red Water’: “Papa called me chief/Gotta keep it brief” beneath stunning soulful  pop hooks. On the R&B inflected rhymes of ‘Nowhere2go’, the Los Angeles rapper explains the need to “redefine himself” and ultimately ‘Some Rap Songs’ finds Kgositile do exactly that.

The poignant ‘December 24’ is a menacing, slow brooding gem that places Earl’s poetic prose beneath cinematic piano tapestries. ‘On The Way!’ contains a sumptuous soul/funk groove. The tempo is slowed on the transcendent single ‘The Mint’ (featuring Navy Blue), another slice of pristine hip hop that serves a parallel alongside the likes of Madvillain and J Dilla such is its divine spell.

This compelling fifteen-track album reflects a hip hop artist that has further evolved and continually develops his unique and immense talents.

‘Some Rap Songs’ is out now on Columbia.

http://earlsweatshirt.com/
https://www.facebook.com/EarlSweatshirtMusic/

9. Marissa Nadler – “For My Crimes” (Bella Union/Sacred Bones)

for my crimes correct

Marissa Nadler, one of the most cherished songwriters of our time, returned with her captivating eighth studio album ‘For My Crimes’ last Autumn. The Massachusetts-based singer-songwriter has carved out eleven deeply affecting and soul-stirring sparse laments whose immediacy and emotional depth resonates powerfully throughout.

It feels as if the essence of the song is captured magnificently to tape wherein each beautiful folk noir exploration navigates the depth of the human heart with naturalness and ease. In contrast to the more polished and layered records that came previously (the magnificent ‘Strangers’ and ‘July’ LPs), Nadler’s intimate song cycles contain quite minimal instrumentation that crafts a hypnotic spell and striking intimacy (intersecting the sound worlds of Townes Van Zandt and Stina Nordenstam).

Nadler co-produced For My Crimes with Lawrence Rothman and Justin Raisen at Rothman’s Laurel Canyon studio, House of Lux. A stellar cast of incredible female musicians joined the recording sessions,  including vocals from Angel Olsen, Sharon Van Etten and Kristin Kontrol, Patty Schemel (Hole, Juliette and the Licks) on drums, Mary Lattimore on harp, and the great experimental multi-instrumentalist Janel Leppin on strings.

Some of the finest, most empowering songs of Nadler’s career is dotted across ‘For My Crime’s intense narrative. Emotive strings and meditative acoustic guitar drift beneath Nadler’s majestic vocal delivery on the windswept beauty of the album’s glorious title-track (and fitting opener). Nadler asks “Please don’t remember me/For my crimes” on the deeply moving, dusk-lit chorus.

The swell of electric guitar and drums create a post-rock grandeur on the sublime ‘Blue Vapour’: a raw energy is unleashed with each and every pulse. The hard-hitting impact of Nadler’s supreme songwriting gifts is distilled on the heartfelt lament ‘Dream Dream Big In The Sky’ which feels as if the words and music are somehow encapsulated in the faded dreams of the clouds above.

‘For My Crimes’ is out now on Bella Union/Sacred Bones.

https://www.marissanadler.com/
https://www.facebook.com/MarissaNadlerMusic/

8. Tirzah – “Devotion” (Domino)

tirzah-devotion.jpg

The year’s finest debut album undeniably comes from London-based songstress and producer Tirzah. The immense talents of this young artist can be felt throughout the album’s utterly contemporary and unique eleven songs. Steeped in R&B, soul and pop spheres, Tirzah’s fresh and alluring compositions very much belong to the here and now whose beguiling song structures forever push the sonic envelope. ‘Devotion’ is written and produced with composer and childhood friend Micachu with gorgeous pop sensibility and minimal production at the heart of the album’s gripping heart and soul.

The striking immediacy – and directness – of these songs makes a profound impact. The deeply affecting downbeat-soul of ‘Gladly’ is a delightful, heart-warming love song with hypnotic vocals and gradual beat. “All I want is you/I love you/Gladly, gladly, gladly” sings Tirzah on the breathtaking chorus. There is simplicity in the song (so it seems) but a complexity in the emotional connection. A gospel, R&B lament. ‘Holding On’ contains a quiet confidence and strength as the 80’s synth pop feel radiates throughout. Again, the minimal nature of these songs forges such deep emotions and colour.

The album’s towering title-track features guest vocalist Coby Sey with his soulful falsetto serving the perfect counterpoint to Tirzah’s understated voice and pristine beats. “So listen to me” is repeated like a mantra; reminiscent of James Blake’s downtempo creations. Tirzah sings “I want your arms” on a later verse, sung with such emotion and sincerity. This duet forms the vital heart of the album’s second half.

The guitar funk groove of the following cut ‘Go Now’ packs significant weight: “Don’t raise your voice to me” is sung in a delicate, near-hushed falsetto on the opening verse. Vulnerability is inherent in this breath-taking soulful lament. Acoustic piano patterns serve the sonic backdrop to the sparse ‘Say When’, brimming with melancholic shades of loss, “I felt you gone and now I am lost”.

Devotion’ heralds a significant new voice in contemporary music.

‘Devotion’ is out now on Domino Recordings.

https://tirzah.net/
https://www.facebook.com/TirzahMusic

7. Mary Lattimore – “Hundreds Of Days” (Ghostly)

Mary-Lattimore-Hundreds-of-Days

Having first discovered Los Angeles-based harpist and composer Mary Lattimore’s 2013 debut ‘The Withdrawing Room’ (released on Desire Path Recordings), each new release has been a hugely exciting discovery. On this year’s ‘Hundreds Of Days’ – and third release for the prestigious Ghostly label – Lattimore’s ethereal, dream-wave bliss of her harp-based compositions casts a spacious, luminescent and captivating sound world of unknown dimensions.

The gorgeous album opener ‘It Feels Like Floating’ feels just like that: the sacred harp tapestries drift in the ether of faded dreams amidst swathes of celestial harmonies. Utterly timeless. Jonsi’s Healing Fields remix is a fascinating re-interpretation that conveys the inspirational quality of Lattimore’s hugely unique and shape shifting compositions.

Guitar, keyboard and percussion is added on the poignant folk gem ‘Never Saw Him Again’: forging a dreamy pop opus from a past we have not yet quite arrived upon. The soundscapes and intricate layers continually build, as if reawakening some once-vivid memories of a loved one. The sparse ‘Hello From the Edge of the Earth’ maps the human heart and Lattimore’s love of the natural world. The lyrical quality of this piece is quite something to behold.

Baltic Birch’ blossomed from Lattimore’s trip to Latvia where she was struck by the abandoned resort towns along the Baltic Sea.  A desolate landscape is etched across the ambient soundscapes with the electric guitar haze recalling Lattimore’s collaborations with Jeff Ziegler.

The LA-based harpist – in much the same way as fellow contemporaries Julianna Barwick, Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith and so on – possesses the ability to transport you to an entirely new realm wherein the music becomes beautifully buried in the pools of one’s mind. ‘Hundreds Of Days’ is yet another gleaming treasure in the composer’s storied career.

‘Hundreds Of Days’ is out now on Ghostly International.

https://marylattimoreharpist.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/harpistmarylattimore/

6. Actress & London Contemporary OrchestraLAGEOS” (Ninja Tune)

lageos-main

‘LAGEOS’ is the utterly compelling, shape shifting debut full length release from renowned electronic producer Darren Cunningham (aka Actress) and the London Contemporary Orchestra. At the heart of this captivating record is both artists’ ceaseless fascination with sound wherein new pathways of discovery are forever attained.

The first traces – committed to tape at least – was last year’s beguiling ‘Audio Track 5’ EP. The divine title-track (which is also found halfway through the record’s second half) comprises of beautifully drifting strings that float amidst crunching percussive rhythms and piano patterns. The splicing of the various components creates a shimmering odyssey of rapturous, luminous soundscapes, where the abstract techno sphere is masterfully blended with modern classical elements. Importantly, lines become blurred throughout ‘LAGEOS’, one cannot pinpoint to any one musical landscape, for it is a far-reaching kaleidoscope of timbres, textures and tones.

LCO’s Hugh Brunt has described the collaboration as being “about exploring an ambiguity of sound that sits between electronic and acoustic spaces.”

It is a joy to discover new contexts and insights into the cherished Actress discography as classics such as ‘Hubble’, ‘N.E.W’ and ‘Voodoo PosseChronic Illusion’ become a deep stream of consciousness and energy flow. The meditative bliss of ‘N.E.W’ with an endless array of enchanting instrumentation, supplied by the LCO, flows deep into your veins. The irresistible cosmic groove of ‘Voodoo Posse’ serves the record’s fitting penultimate track before the joyously empowering ‘Hubble’s techno fueled odyssey maps one’s innermost fears and dreams.

‘LAGEOS’ is out now on Ninja Tune.

https://www.ninjatune.net/artist/actress
https://www.lcorchestra.co.uk/

5. Low – “Double Negative” (Sub Pop)

low_doublenegative

The much beloved Minnesota trio sculpted one of their finest, most empowering works to date with ‘Double Negative’, released earlier this year on the Seattle label Sub Pop. In similar fashion to 2015’s ‘Ones and Sixes’, the band enlisted B.J. Burton (James Blake, The Tallest Man on Earth) for production duties but here, the dazzling experiments are developed much further, forging deeply moving collages of cinematic, charged rock odysseys that seep into one’s very own consciousness. Abrasive beats and dazzling electronic components melt alongside Mimi Parker and Alan Sparhawk’s heavenly – soul searching – harmonies and Neil Young-esque guitar echo and reverb.

A dark undercurrent permeates throughout the record, reflecting these dark, uncertain times we find ourselves in. The brooding and hypnotic ‘Trying To Work It Out’ is classic Low with the slowcore bliss of Sparhawk’s highly emotive vocal delivery: “I saw you at the grocery store/I know I should have walked over and say hello/It seemed like you were in a hurry/I didn’t want to slow you down/So I figured out I should let you go.” Dissonance abounds. In many ways, the record serves a parallel with Nick Cave’s latest ‘Skeleton Tree’ – both records are borne out of a sea of darkness and despair but both records ultimately possess an incalculable empowering capability.

The delicate beauty of the meditative ‘Always Up’ is a precious ballad that depicts the frustration dispelled by the world today. The chorus refrain of Mimi Parker’s angelic vocal delivery “I believe I believe I believe I believe/Can’t you see Can’t you see Can’t you see?” emits a cathartic energy flow that is steeped in an unfathomable beauty. Rawest of emotions flood out of these recordings, feeling both vital and colossal in equal measure.

How the songs fade into one another is another marvel of ‘Double Negative’: the multi-layered textures and static that envelopes the space; creating something considerably larger than the sum of its parts. ‘Fly’ is one of the album’s most stunning moments with its Mimi Parker-led soulful dimension “Leave my weary bones and fly” is the deeply affecting chorus that reduces you to tears upon each visit. How the infectious bass groove melds with Parker’s falsetto leaves you dumbfounded such is its unwavering beauty. Uncertainty breathes heavily throughout. But there is hope buried deep in its gorgeous soulful strut.

‘Double Negative’ is out now on Sub Pop.

https://www.chairkickers.com/
https://www.facebook.com/lowmusic/

4. Djrum – “Portrait with Firewood” (R&S Records)

djrum portrait

UK producer Felix Manuel (AKA Djrum) is responsible for one of the most poignant, soul-stirring electronic records of the year with his R&S debut full-length ‘Portrait with Firewood’. The wide range of sounds – everything from modern classical and ambient soundscapes to gripping techno and dubstep flourishes – is one of the hallmarks of this remarkable tour-de-force. The emotional depth of Manuel’s electronic works is perhaps the most alluring trademark of Djrum’s scintillating sonic voyage. For example, the intoxicating electronic-infused classical opus ‘Blue Violet’ (one of the most mind-bending tracks of 2018) unleashes a timelessness that is all too rare in today’s dance music. Analog synths and strings are masterfully woven together amidst beautifully cinematic spoken word segments. “Do you remember how you told me about lightning striking? All of those things you told me to wait for?” is softly uttered by a female voice, beneath meditative piano notes. ‘Blue Violet’ details love, passion, obsession and all points of the human condition – the spirit of Nils Frahm and Jon Hopkins radiates throughout this towering composition.

Waters Rising’ sees Manuel collaborate with vocalist Lola Empire, crafting a beguiling soulful R&B techno gem. Several of Djrum’s piano improvisations serve the initial sketches of these compelling explorations. Techno bliss is etched across the album’s central tracks ‘Creature Pt 2’ and ‘Sex’; the latter fusing introspective piano and violin motifs and intoxicating techno/jungle beats (further highlighting the boundless nature of Djrum’s enveloping sound).

Describe by Djrum as a “confessional record”; the melancholic shades come to the fore on the record’s final third. The highly immersive ‘Sparrow’ is one of the record’s defining moments wherein a spoken word segment floats majestically beneath intricate layers of jazz inflections: “I’ll show you my scars/You show me the stars”. A rich poignancy is inherent in each of ‘Portrait with Firewood’s luminous musical works.

‘Portrait with Firewood’ is out now on R&S Records.

https://djrum.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/DjrumMusic/

3. Penelope Trappes – “Penelope Two” (Houndstooth)

penelopetwo

London-based artist Penelope Trappes’ sophomore full-length ‘Penelope Two’ – and follow-up to her essential debut ‘Penelope One’ for Optimo Music – casts a hypnotic, luminous spell through its stunningly beautiful song cycles: drenched in reverb that somehow drift into the ether of our innermost fears. The stark intimacy of the Australian-born composer’s compositions is what strikes you immediately; evoking the timeless spirit of early 4AD artists (This Mortal Coil, Cocteau Twins) and kindred spirits of Grouper’s Liz Harris and Tropic Of Cancer.

On the album’s gripping centrepiece ‘Maeve’, the chorus refrain of “let go” is repeated beneath delicate piano chords and lucid guitar haze. I feel ‘Penelope Two’ becomes a process of letting go: to allow the waves of anguish and pain wash over you and, in  turn, to wrap your troubles up in dreams. The raw emotion distilled in Trappes’ soaring vocals casts infinite rays of solace and hope as light flickers from within the depths of darkness.

The way in which the drone infused ambient instrumentals (‘Silence’; ‘Kismet’; ‘Exodus’) are masterfully interwoven with the vocal-based song structures (‘Connector’; ‘Burn On’; ‘Maeve’) creates one cohesive whole of staggering beauty and emotional depth. The ethereal dream pop gem of ‘Connector’ possesses endurance to overcome the darkness. The immaculate production and divine soundscapes immerses the listener inside a wholly other realm. The chorus refrain “I am the connector” epitomizes the magical, far-reaching qualities of Trappes’ immense songwriting prowess.

‘Penelope Two’ is out now on Houndstooth.

https://penelopetrappes.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/penelopetrappes/

2. Julia Holter – “Aviary” (Domino)

aviary

The peerless Los Angeles songwriter and composer Julia Holter has long been carving out the most ground breaking and breath-taking avant pop masterworks and this year’s ‘Aviary’ reveals an artist at the peak of her powers. The album’s enthralling fifteen compositions explore further into bewitching experimental terrain as an abstract canvas of vivid textures, colour and timbres ascend into the forefront of one’s heart and mind.

The immaculate instrumentation and mesmerizing arrangements – a constant throughout Holter’s cherished songbook – lies at the heart of these stunning song cycles. The epic ‘Chaitius’ opens with gorgeous orchestration of strings, brass and choral lines that conveys the kaleidoscopic vision of the American composer’s newest musical venture. These sprawling, vast pieces feel as if the soundscapes could glide forever into infinity (and beyond). Holter sings “Open my wings with joy” on the opening verse; conveying the artist’s search for love and solace “amidst all the internal and external babble we experience daily”. The way the composition evolves and develops is akin to a process of self-discovery or acceptance. The vocoder/spoken word segments emits such rich imagery that reflects “the melting world” of today’s chaotic world we find ourselves in. Euphoria and an awakening sensation abounds on the glorious crescendo of Holter’s trusted ensemble (double bass as ever adding seductive rhythmic pulses to the sacred sound worlds effortlessly created). The continual striving for direction never feels far away: “Who will tell me what to do? Don’t say to feel so alove.”

It is clear with ‘Aviary’ that Holter effortlessly delves deeper into experimentation with sound; perhaps the first cue for the song’s inception was a sonic idea during the music-making process. The hypnotic, meditative lament ‘Voce Simul’ begins with a cosmic jazz bassline groove beneath Holter’s hushed vocal delivery and ethereal trumpet lines. The spoken word passages are masterfully blended with this cinematic backdrop: “I was just about to go outside” utters Holter on a later verse – inviting the listener on a wholly unique journey. As ever, the past and future become masterfully placed together – at once akin to “a distant mirror” of “a hundred minds” as Holter asks “How did I forget I’m part of the dust?”

The lead single ‘I Shall Love 2’ combined with its sister song – and symphonic rejoice – ‘I Shall Love 1’ form integral components of each half of ‘Aviary’s striking narrative. The former is yet another pristine pop oeuvre with gorgeous melodic flourishes and an awakening of the senses. The song’s deeply empowering rise “That is all that is all/There is nothing else” is a joy to savour; I visualize the moving scenes of the guiding angels in Wim Wender’s ‘Wings of Desire’ who listen to the thoughts of its human inhabitants. In a similar fashion, ‘I Shall Love’ (both movements) offers comfort and warmth.

The soaring beauty of ‘Words I Heard’ is steeped in 60s pop grandeur and Laurel Canyon pop perfection. How Holter’s achingly beautiful voice blends with the strings evokes a dream within a dream; a labyrinth of ancient and modern times – transposed to one sprawling, poignant canvas. The creative process is beautifully articulated on the fitting album closer ‘Why Sad Song’: “Oh ideas, Idea – oh why the words are made of?” But it is the dazzling, contemporary pop tour-de-force ‘Les Jeux To You’ that illustrates just how far ‘Aviary’s journey takes you on. The playful use – and richness – of words combined with the futuristic pop backdrop carves out something wholly unique and otherworldly. The deeply moving quality of Holter’s sacred artistic works is forever etched in the song’s gripping foundations: “I can hope for it today/I wonder though, if my heart tells me everything I need.”

‘Aviary’ is out now on Domino Recordings.

https://juliaholter.com/
https://www.facebook.com/juliashammasholter/

1. Nils Frahm – “All Melody” (Erased Tapes)

nilsfrahm-allmelody

Our most cherished record of the year undoubtedly comes from world-renowned, Berlin-based composer Nils Frahm’s latest masterpiece ‘All Melody’.

The immense beauty – and immensity – of the far-reaching soundscapes dotted across “All Melody’s musical landscape is a joy to savour. A myriad of sacred tones are effortlessly spliced together like that of the double helix pattern of each DNA molecule found inside our cells. It is as if a towering composition like “Sunson” unfolds, mutates, and transforms before your very eyes: the soaring juno synthesizer is melded gorgeously with the otherworldly sounds of the handmade pipe organ. The seamless array of colours and textures creates an empowering ripple flow of emotions. Choral odysseys dissolve into this vast sea of forgotten dreams. As the piece continually builds, the interlinked rhythms are forever over-lapping; magical moments within moments are captured at each and every pulse.

Modern-classical, dub and avant pop spheres are masterfully blended together on ‘A Place’. The inner dialogue between the components (choir, strings, percussion, synthesizer, and rhodes) creates a deeply bewitching symphony of celestial sounds. How the female voice is mixed with the luminescent juno synthesizer provides a significant milestone in “All Melody’s mind-bending oeuvre. Gripping dub beats awash with soul-stirring strings. The sonic terrain has expanded, almost exponentially. It feels as if a deep symbiosis exists between all of its vital elements; each one inter-dependent of one another, reacting, breathing and growing as the loop drifts forever into the ether of unknown dimensions.

The possibilities are endless. “#2” fades in – almost subliminally – as the embers of “All Melody” gradually dissolve. Techno bliss is masterfully etched across the sprawling canvas of synthesizer arrangements, creating, in turn, psychedelic dreams orbiting the furthest reaches of one’s inner consciousness.

The album’s penultimate track “Kaleidoscope” conveys the visionary nature of Frahm’s music: the pattern of the interwoven elements (choir, organ and synthesizer) is constantly changing; forever in motion and altering in sequence (in turn, generating endless possibilities). The immaculate exploration feels at once ancient and utterly contemporary; a joyously uplifting creation with its dazzling ebb and flow akin to a river finding its sea.

All Melody” is a defining record for the ages. This is a journey into sound.

‘All Melody’ is out now on Erased Tapes.

http://www.nilsfrahm.com/
https://www.facebook.com/nilsfrahm

Mixtape: Fractured Air – “You Grow Closer”

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fracturedair_yougrowcloser_sleeve

“You Grow Closer” features: the Albuquerque, New Mexico-based independent music treasures A Hawk And A Hacksaw (Jeremy Barnes and Heather Trost), who released their latest album “Forest Bathing” earlier this year via LM-Dupli-cation. Like every record made (or influenced) by the hands of Barnes and Trost, the results are nothing short of astounding. Also featuring other 2018 gems including: peerless songwriter Marissa Nadler’s majestic “For My Crimes” (due for release this Autumn via Bella Union & Sacred Bones); world-renowned UK cellist Oliver Coates’s scintillating “Shelley’s On Zenn-La” full-length, his first for RVNG Intl which is scheduled for release on 7th September; Laurel Halo’s “Raw Silk Uncut Wood” (Latency); Helena Hauff’s “Qualm” (Ninja Tune); Steve Hauschildt’s “Dissolvi” (Ghostly International).

Fractured Air – “You Grow Closer” – August 2018

01. Aretha Franklin“You Grow Closer” (Checker, Chess)
02. Laurel Halo – “Mercury” (Latency Records)
03. A Hawk And A Hacksaw“The Shepherd Dogs are Calling” (LM Dupli-cation)
04. Zazou Bikaye“Mangungu” (Crammed Discs)
05. Talking Heads“Houses In Motion” (Sire)
06. DJ Lilocox“Vozes Ricas” (Principe)
07. Actress & LCO“Hubble” (Ninja Tune)
08. Oliver Coates“A Church” (RVNG Intl)
09. Helena Hauff“It Was All Fields When I Was A Kid” (Ninja Tune)
10. Steve Hauschildt feat Julianna Barwick“Saccade” (Ghostly)
11. Gang Gang Dance“J-TREE” (4AD)
12. Tim Hecker“I’m Transmitting Tonight” (Kranky)
13. Aïsha Devi – “DNA” (Houndstooth)
14. Caterina Barbieri – “Curve Sciolte” (Σ)
15. Colin Stetson – “Aftermath” (Hereditary OST) (Milan Records)
16. JOYFULTALK – “Monocult” (Constellation)
17. Exploded View – “Raven Raven” (Sacred Bones)
18. Szun Waves – “Constellation” (Leaf Label)
19. Brigid Mae Power – “Down on the Ground” (Tompkins Square)
20. Papa M – “Walt’s” (Drag City)
21. Marissa Nadler – “For My Crimes” (Bella Union)
22. A Hawk And A Hacksaw – “The Magic Spring” (LM Dupli-cation)
23. John Jacob Niles“I’m Goin’ Away” (LM Dupli-cation)

 

Chosen One: Actress & London Contemporary Orchestra

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“…but I do love the meshing of beautiful sound ideas, textures and tones. I like the idea of running them through a computerised process without it seeming as if it’s been touched.”

 Darren Cunningham (Actress)

Words: Mark Carry

Actress-x-LCO-Press-Shot-v2

‘LAGEOS’ is the utterly compelling, shape shifting debut full length release from renowned electronic producer Darren Cunningham (aka Actress) and the London Contemporary Orchestra. At the heart of this captivating record is both artists’ ceaseless fascination with sound wherein new pathways of discovery are forever attained.

The first traces – committed to tape at least – was last year’s beguiling ‘Audio Track 5’ EP. The divine title-track (which is also found halfway through the record’s second half) comprises of beautifully drifting strings that float amidst crunching percussive rhythms and piano patterns. The splicing of the various components creates a shimmering odyssey of rapturous, luminous soundscapes, where the abstract techno sphere is masterfully blended with modern classical elements. Importantly, lines become blurred throughout ‘LAGEOS’, one cannot pinpoint to any one musical landscape, for it is a far-reaching kaleidoscope of timbres, textures and tones.

LCO’s Hugh Brunt has described the collaboration as being “about exploring an ambiguity of sound that sits between electronic and acoustic spaces.” The new co-write ‘Galya Beat’ embodies just that as majestic violin lines are blended with rippling percussion and intense electronic passages: a rich new musical language is formed before your very eyes.

The gorgeous opener – and title-track – ‘LAGEOS’ opens with a gentle crackle of electronics which feels akin to a magical fireworks display dancing across a night’s skyline. Chaotic string patterns ascend into the mix like shooting stars with glorious illuminations of mind bending sounds. The near-choral bliss of ‘Momentum’ follows next with dazzling pulses of achingly beautiful sound waves (precisely orbiting the ether of unknown dimensions).

It is a joy to discover new contexts and insights into the cherished Actress discography as classics such as ‘Hubble’, ‘N.E.W’ and ‘Voodoo Posse, Chronic Illusion’ become a deep stream of consciousness and energy flow. The meditative bliss of ‘N.E.W’ with an endless array of enchanting instrumentation, supplied by the LCO, flows deep into your veins. The irresistible cosmic groove of ‘Voodoo Posse’ serves the record’s fitting penultimate track before the joyously empowering ‘Hubble’s techno fuelled odyssey maps one’s innermost fears and dreams.

Alice Coltrane once said “I just go within” and this echoes powerfully throughout this incredibly inspiring collaboration between Actress and LCO, the sumptuously layered tracks come from deep within one’s soul, heart and spirit.

‘LAGEOS’ is out now on Ninja Tune.

https://ninjatune.net/artist/actress

 

Actress2013_PiotrNiepsuj

Interview with Darren Cunningham (Actress).

 

Congratulations Darren on the utterly captivating new full length ‘LAGEOS’; a glorious collaboration with LCO. Please take me back to the process by which you received the individual LCO recorded instrumental parts and, in turn, your manipulation of these sounds? It feels like such a fascinating sound experiment, and I wonder how your approach varied depending on the nature of the music you got hold of?

Darren Cunningham: Tar thanks 🙂 It was a split process of sorts really. The process of recording the instrumental parts were organised separately in a different acoustical sound environment in the UK. This process layer was then moved to another sound environment in Berlin. It was at this point that I started to receive stems from the first process, and from that point created a demo of what the album could soon like based on what id heard from outside of the recording process, so at each point there’s a flow of information that can be reorganised and captured in the studio.

At the final point I receive the stems created for each instrument and begin the electronics process in my studio. Dipping sounds through chromdioxid super II at different frequencies and layering sound oscillations via subtle modular relays. Some were layered chaotically within the framework of orchestration, or in some cases specifically mapped to expression.

The classical world combined with the electronic sphere conjures up such a shape shifting, mind bending experience. Can you discuss your desires and hopes for this project (from the outset) and your love of classical music (I believe your first musical instrument was the clarinet, so ‘LAGEOS’ is almost like the completion of a full circle for you)?

DC: Hmmm “love of classical music” I  wouldn’t technically describe myself as someone who “loves” classical music, but I do love the meshing of beautiful sound ideas, textures and tones. I like the idea of running them through a computerised process without it seeming as if its been touched.

I came across and begun to appreciate classical music by chance, having heard Gabriel Faure’s – Requiem, but I was exposed to a classical instrument when i was about 10 and that was the clarinet. I committed to the ritual of practice for a reasonable amount of time (2)years. Brief stint in orchestra (2hrs), and that was it. So definitely the clarinet forms some sort of symbolic reference, but ultimately for me this was just an exercise to learn more about music.

This project began with the live show in the Barbican back in 2016. I’d love for you to discuss the source of inspiration that this space and its architecture has had on the music making process and the resultant recorded output?

DC: I’d say the Barbican is a great space for capturing a sort of introspective analysis.

Amped up isolation

An exchange of communication

Like a friendly council estate for the arts

Enriching lives

community

and waterfalls

‘LAGEOS’ gives beautiful new insights into several classic cuts from the cherished Actress back catalog. In what ways do you feel these tracks (such as N.E.W. or ‘Voodoo Posse, Chronic Illusion’) have metamorphosed given this new classical context?

DC: They’re just so weirdly inverted its endlessly fascinating to me.

Lastly, the immense detail and intricate layers – forever colliding particles that feel a distillation of endless moments within moments – of the vastly compelling Actress sound unleashes such a timeless, far-reaching state. Please shed some light into your compositional approach and your fascination with sound? Are there certain musical philosophies that you feel have been central to your artistic creations

DC: DISCOVERY

 

Photography by Tom D Morgan - www.tomdmorgan.com

 

Interview with Robert Ames (co-Artistic Director of LCO).

 

The forthcoming Actress & London Contemporary Orchestra ‘LAGEOS’ record is really quite special. Firstly, I’d be very curious to learn how this particular collaboration was conceived and to bring me back to the original live Barbican show in 2016?

Robert Ames: So about a year before we did that show at the Barbican, we sat down to have a think about who in that world we’d really love to work with (it came out of the meetings that we had with Boiler Room; there was a bunch of us there) and we all agreed that Actress would be amazing for it because he’s got such an incredible ear for the detail in the music and there’s so many layers of interest as well. So it would be really interesting to give him orchestral instruments as a palette to play with – just like he works when he’s creating his tracks with a load of found sounds to create his music before; it would be interesting for him to treat out orchestral instruments in the same way. So, that was about a year before the Barbican show. We had a long process of introducing instruments to him; we were all hitting ideas off each other and then we got the Barbican show.

The classical world and the techno/electronic world really complement each other, it just combines so well.

RA: Yeah, it’s a really interesting time at the moment where – I’m trying not to use the label contemporary classical music because it doesn’t make so much sense – there seems to be a really interesting natural cross-over that’s happening quite a lot between genres and particularly electronic music producers and composers in the world we work in more it seems to be a lot more fluid now and ideas seem to be flowing between each other and it’s hard to pigeon-hole the music in a specific genre so much. And I think that’s something that really exciting about the LCO is finding those ambiguous spaces where it’s really exciting in to make it happen and try to facilitate that and facilitate recording and the live shows. Actress is one of the most exciting examples doing that and we’re really looking forward to the Barbican show that’s coming up and for everybody to hear that album.

I was very curious to hear how much a source of inspiration the Barbican itself was in terms of the space and the architecture?

RA: That’s right, the architecture – especially for Darren more than anybody else – was a big influence in his thought process for the initial show: that brutalist, concrete architecture I think you can definitely hear that in some of the music.

‘Audio Track 5’ was the first taste of this collaboration when it came out last year. Again, it’s the organic feel to it and very distinctive timbres happening like these found sounds etched in the detail somewhere. You presumably had good fun putting a track like this together?

RA: It’s an interesting one that one (I’m just trying to remember off the top of my head). Of the specific instrument or sounds you hear on that; you hear that kind of low crunching sound and that’s a prepared piano and  stuff that is going on high up, you get a lot of plucked harp sounds that have obviously been treated by Darren as well as violin lines (which are played by our lead violinist Galya Bisengalieva).

For these live shows, is it a case of rehearsing a lot in advance or is it an intense short burst of a period?

RA: It’s a fairly intense process. The really nice thing about these shows – we’ve played a couple now and have more planned and obviously they’re all happening in different places but they happen in very different atmospheres as well. So for example we played the Barbican in London last year, we did a show in Moscow that was more of a club venue and it was a standing capacity. We haven’t had a set-list (like bands would have a set-list): we go into the space, we see how we all feel and how the musicians feel and think what audience we’re going to get and we chop and change the set-list depending on that so it’s got a nice programming behind it depending on the space, the atmosphere, the audience and the musicians.

Thinking about your other collaborations, Mica Levi is another person who really typifies this sort of uncategorizable sound and someone who is so unique in the current music world.

RA: That’s really interesting; we’ve just been working on something new with her at the moment. So, Mica Levi and another musician called Koby Sey and a visual artist called Hannah Perry and some musicians from LCO. And so far that’s been four days: very open, work shopping and improvisation and throwing ideas out. So the work we do with her ranges from that all the way to a very specific commission to write a string quartet and we just performed that at the opening of the Queen Elizabeth Hall, we performed it at the Roundhouse as part of Ron Arad’s Curtain Call. And we’re just about to fly off to Salzburg to perform that and that’s a much more standard process where she writes a piece of music, she comes and she presents it to us; we work on it a bit with her, share some thoughts and then we enjoy performing her work.

Does the LCO change or alter in size depending on the nature of the project or time and other constraints?

RA: Yeah it does. I started the orchestra with co-founder Hugh Brunt in 2008 and it started off being large orchestral but we’d like to think of the orchestra as a collective of musicians as opposed to something that’s really inflexible. So, in one concert we could have like a solo piece of music all the way up to a ninety piece orchestra all the way down to a string quartet; so we do a massive array of different types of concerts and different line-ups of ensembles. We record a lot of stuff as well, so something like ‘Alien: Covenant’ which we recorded with Jed Kurzel (and that was a 90-piece orchestra) and we just did a string quartet concert at the Queen Elizabeth Hall and we’re going to be doing a massive orchestral show in October at the Barbican called Other World which is the amazing batch of shows, eight of our core musicians that we work with a lot. So it’s really changing all the time and it’s nice to be able to do that; it means instead of going to a composer and saying ‘this is what we’ve got, you’ve got to write this’, we can say ‘this is what we’ve got, enjoy it and we can be flexible to what you want.’

There is a wide range of found sounds on ‘LAGEOS’. So, as a listener you’d be asking ‘what is this sound?’ and I just love how all these elements are spliced together so brilliantly.

RA: Yeah, that’s right. A lot of the sounds on there are devised by the musicians themselves so instead of being standard classical sounds, there is a lot of extended techniques on there you especially hear that on the violin, viola and cello. Then you hear a lot of great, interesting percussion techniques like the Marimba’s with blankets thrown over them; plastic bags being used; the clarinet being used more of a percussive instrument. So it’s these very well-known instruments that are being explored throughout their whole sound world. So that’s coming from Darren first or wanting to find out exactly what more instruments can do, the musician having the technical ability to create all these sounds and show them to him.

The studio itself that you record in, is this a space that you all would be familiar with?

RA: This was a slightly different recording process to what we’d usually do. So, although we perform and rehearse together, we actually recorded the stem – the stem being we recorded every single instrument independently and built them up so we could give Darren control over the individual lines and so Hugh and I would have control as well. And the mixing stage we did with our friends at Spitfire Audio Studio: they are a really amazing company; they make sound library store for composers so we recorded in their studio which we recorded our sound library we did with them and we had a great engineer called Harry Wilson.

Was the process itself a short intense period or more lengthy, gradual stages?

RA: It was quite intense, it happened over two very, very long days of each musician independently and obviously each track has a different amount of musicians; some of them have scores and some of them don’t so some were quicker to record than others. So I think safely to say by far my favourite track on the album is a track called ‘Galya Beat’ and that’s not scored at all and that’s written by Galya (the violinist), Sam Wilson (the percussionist) and Darren, so that’s a pure co-write between those three guys and for me is what the collaboration is al about. And there’s elements of improvisation in the writing of that, so something like that was really quick and fresh to record because they performed it so much. The other ones which are a little bit more notated took a bit more time.

One of my favourites at the moment – and it’s where it’s placed as well – is ‘Voodoo Posse, Chronic Illusion’and that groove that goes on throughout.

RA: Yeah it’s a great one, I mean it’s one of his classic tunes, it’s really amazing. It’s fun exploring that groove and it’s fun exploring the darker sound worlds of that piece. And the nice thing about that is the way we perform and the way the music is notated it doesn’t have a set duration, so if we see the audience is enjoying the groove we’ll keep it going for longer.

I gather it’s these live performances would be the most fulfilling or rewarding parts of it all? You’re so deeply involved with everything from composing and writing to arranging, recording and so on, is the live performance the ultimate part of it?

RA: Yeah, the live performance is the really, really fun bit. But it’s actually just being in a room with Darren and just working through sounds has been an incredibly rewarding experience because we’ve learned so much from him and his process; the way he works so it’s been really fulfilling the whole thing.

‘LAGEOS’ is out now on Ninja Tune.

https://ninjatune.net/artist/actress

 

 

 

 

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June 5, 2018 at 1:58 pm

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S02E09 | September mix

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fracturedair_sep17

Australian-born composer and songwriter Carla dal Forno’s eagerly-anticipated new material comes in the form of “The Garden”, a 12” for UK’s Blackest Ever Black, due for release on October 6th and folow-up to her sublime debut full-length “You Know What It’s Like”. Dal Forno is also a member of the trio F ingers (alongside Samuel Karmel and Tarquin Manek) who release their second LP, “Awkwardly Blissing Out”, this month. Recorded in Melbourne and Berlin between 2015–17, the album is the follow-up to the trio’s 2015 debut album “Hide Before Dinner”. Dal Forno’s own mixes (originally made for Berlin Community Radio while residing in the German capital; she now compiles monthly hour-long shows for NTS Radio) are always an indispensable source for music (Circuit 7’s “Eastern Dreams” from our September mixtape is one such example).

The forever-inspiring Chicago-based artist Circuit des Yeux (Haley Fohr) releases her magnificent fifth studio album “Reaching For Indigo” on U.S. independent Drag City on 20th October. Unveiled so far is the mesmerising new single “Black Fly” which confirms Fohr as one of independent music’s most singular voices and fascinating contemporary music-makers.

Anthology Recordings – Mexican Summer’s reissue imprint – release the majestic compilation “Feel The Music Vol. 1” next month. Compiled by Paul Major – pioneering record dealer and frontman of the band Endless Boogie – this truly special record effortlessly spans sounds and styles (folk, psychedelia, blues, rock n roll) while unearthing a plethora of truly unique (and largely unknown to wider audiences) songwriters from a golden age of music.

September’s mix also features new releases from possibly the year’s most anticipated pair of albums which come courtesy of both Four Tet (“New Energy”, Text) and Godspeed You! Black Emperor (Constellation). Electronic maestro Four Tet and his monumental “New Energy” album (available via his Text imprint from 29th September); Montréal’s mythical Godspeed You! Black Emperor unleash their sublime seventh album “Luciferian Towers” via Constellation which confirm the band (as if confirmation was ever necessary) as one of the world’s most ceaselessly innovative and breathtaking bands.

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S02E09 | September mix

 

To listen on La Blogothèque:

http://www.blogotheque.net/2017/09/29/fractured-air-x-blogotheque-s02e09-september-mix/

 

01. Godspeed You! Black Emperor“Fam/Famine” (Constellation)
02. Dungen“Achmed Flyger” (Version 1) (Versions by Prins Thomas) (Smalltown Supersound)
03. James Holden & The Animal Spirits“Each Moment Like The First” (Border Community)
04. Circuit des Yeux“Black Fly” (Drag City)
05. Forest Swords“Raw Language” (Ninja Tune)
06. Yasuaki Shimizu“Seiko 1” (Crammed Discs)
07. Ariel Pink“Feels Like Heaven” (Mexican Summer)
08. The Smiths“The Hand That Rocks The Cradle” (Rough Trade)
09. Arthur Russell“Get Around To It” (Rough Trade, Audika)
10. Nausea“No Conversation” (Ecstatic)
11. Circuit 7“Eastern Dreams” (Minimal Wave)
12. Carla dal Forno“The Garden” (Blackest Ever Black)
13. Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith“To Feel Your Best” (Western Vinyl)
14. Richard Horowitz“Eros Never Stops Dreaming” (RVNG Intl)
15. F Ingers“Your Confused” (Blackest Ever Black)
16. Geinoh Yamashirogumi“Kaneda” (Akira OST, Milan)
17. Sanza“Sounout” (Original Mix) (Music For Dreams)
18. Burial“Rodent” (Hyperdub)
19. Four Tet“Scientists” (Text)
20. Actress & London Contemporary Orchestra“Audio Track 5” (Ninja Tune)
21. Carmen Villain“Red Desert” (Smalltown Supersound)
22. Blue Iverson“Who Shot Lucious Lyon?” (Self-Released)
23. Darius“I Feel The Need To Carry On” (Anthology Recordings)
24. Bill Mackay & Ryley Walker“Dragonfly” (Drag City)
25. Ry Cooder“I Knew These People” (excerpt) (Paris Texas OST, Warner Bros.)
26. Sun Kil Moon“Si, Paloma” (Caldo Verde)

Compiled by Fractured Air, September 2017. The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.

http://www.blogotheque.net/
https://fracturedair.com/

Chosen One: Moiré

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Interview with Moiré.

or maybe it’s going to be something totally different because it’s meant to be about the new music; that for me is what techno has always meant.”

Moiré

Words: Mark Carry

Moire-Photo_1_686

London-based producer Moiré continues his remarkable output on his latest full-length ‘No Future’, recently released on the prestigious Ghostly label. The gifted producer has continually evolved with a string of captivating blissed-out techno and synth odysseys (beginning with 2013 debut EP ‘Never Sleep’ via Actress’s Werkdiscs label) and ‘No Future’ sees Moiré exploring further and deeper into realms of deeply engaging and compelling techno explorations.

Of course, ceaseless lines are beautifully blurred amidst Moiré’s masterful songcraft from the utterly transcendent ambient bliss of album closer ‘Auteur (Outro)’ (whose heavenly cosmic synth patterns feel could loop forever) to the hypnotic acid house of ‘Jupiter’ and deeply-affecting soulful hip-hop (DRS is the trusted MC for two sublime cuts ‘No Future’ and ‘Bootleg’). Elements of dubstep and grime are dotted across the James Messiah guested opus ‘Facade’. ‘No Future’ is a reflection on humanity wherein a dystopian vision burns through the embers of fear, pain and doubt. The mantra of “fallen angel” echoes powerfully across the thumpy bass and gauzing synths of ‘Bootleg’.

“Techno music has always been about new music” reiterates Moiré. In many ways, revisiting ‘No Future’ serves a fitting parallel alongside  the enigmatic UK artist Actress, who similarly crafts singular, shape-shifting works. The trippy ‘Opium’ and Afrobeat rhythms of ‘Magma Dream’ supply yet more neon-filled rapturous dance music. The perfect come-down arrives on the final two cuts: the introspective and multi-layered hazy ambient tour-de-force ‘System 100’ and the forever evolving musical patterns of ‘Auteur’ waltzes, mutates and dazzles.

‘No Future’ is out now on Ghostly.

https://www.facebook.com/MoireMusic

https://www.facebook.com/ghostly/

Moire_1-Credit_Netti_Hurley_6863

 

Interview with Moiré.

 

Congratulations on the new album ‘No Future’, which is really quite incredible. Please discuss the making of the new record? I mean you’re very prolific with an array of wonderful releases under  your belt, I wonder when did you begin working on ‘No Future’ and the ideas you had for this latest set?

Moiré: Making music is probably the starting point when I did my first album on my first record because I think once you start you want to continue. ‘No Future’ for me is just a continuation of something I wanted to do from the start. And when I finished my first album and then I did some gigs and I toured and then I did maybe another single or two and then there was time to do another album because suddenly there was so much material to work with that I decided it’s time to make another record (in a technical way). I don’t just go and make music like ‘Today I’m going to make an album’, it didn’t happen that way it’s a more organic and natural process of making something like that. So it was inspired by everything that was happening in my personal life during that time and then it coincided with what was happening in the country in the UK and the announcement of all sorts of political changes that will be happening and then of course the changes that were starting to happen in America. That combined with my life situation and my family situation and some other things created in my head the need to have to finish the record; now is the time because I have the reason to make it, I have the reason to express myself in that way. And so that’s how it started and that’s where it started.

And then I mean the process is I’m sure as you know it’s quite a lengthy procedure. I like to take my time to make sure the tracks or whatever that is I release are the ones that I want. I mean there’s millions of versions of each track probably and you’re getting to the point where you’re doing two hundred versions of the same track and then you’re like ‘OK, actually I think the first version was the best’ and so the process is very long sometimes. But sometimes the tracks just happen, you know there’s certain ideas, certain sketches, certain experimentations, certain emotional expression, or sometimes I feel bad and I’ll go to the studio and make a track or sometimes I actually create a composition where there’s little planning and sometimes there’s a lot of planning into the making of music, I mean it really depends. As I say, I see this as an art form rather than like a session musician going in and doing a job. So, millions of hours in the studio; loads of nights and loads of days. My studio doesn’t have any windows, it’s quite a secluded environment and quite isolated in that sense so I was just on my own for a year with music basically and that’s the effect of it.

As you describe perfectly that’s exactly as a listener you feel as you hear the tracks, there’s just that outpour of everything that you put into the work because it’s fascinating the multitude of layers and moments within each song.

Moiré: That’s always been my thing. I mean I understand what journalists and the industry are always trying to put certain sounds to a certain box so they can tick the box and this is that or this is this. And for me, the music which of course has elements of techno and house in it and ambient and all sorts of things but that’s the thing it has everything because I think of just making music so I’m not going to limit myself to one particular sound or one particular concept. And also that was always for me the main idea behind techno – or any techno-related ideas – was that this was meant to be about new music, not the genre thing that established itself as this one particular type of dance music but actually for me that was never the point; the point was that it was maybe going to be dance or maybe it won’t be, maybe it would be experimental music or maybe it’s going to be something totally different because it’s meant to be about the new music; that for me is what techno has always meant. Or any kind of electronic music for that matter was always like ‘So what I’m going to make the next record and the next record’ is meant to be some sort of evolution; I should be trying new things. That in a way is my obligation as an artist that is engaging with music and trying music and being allowed to make music, to actually give music something back in terms of giving music some justice and some time of the day that actually I feel very lucky that I am able to do and release records.

In a way I don’t like it easy but also I feel like it’s so important, maybe not now but in ten or twenty years someone is going to find this record will be like ‘Oh this is a really interesting record’ and that’s how I discovered a lot of stuff that I’ve been inspired by that just now are getting the recognition after decades of being hidden. And I think that’s my attitude; it’s just basically art. I know it’s  a club music that maybe people are going to dance to it but I never think about it that much. Of course there are these elements that are driving the tracks forward and that there is this constant step and I am always trying to see what’s underneath the classic conventions that we have or industry trends.

Someone earlier today asked me would I be willing to have tracks with no beats or something like that and I thought about it and basically it’s like maybe why not but that shouldn’t really be a conversation, that should be left to the artist to decide I feel like there is an industry push towards certain things to be like ‘OK this season we’re going to do ambient and next season we’re going to do noise and next season we’re going to do new wave’ and it’s pretty much all the same but we’re just going in loops in terms of what’s trendy or what should be done. So, I’m just trying to look in music and tracks and give them as much passion and artistic approach as I can and I guess that’s what you’re talking about and I hope this somehow comes out when you listen to it.

I love the flow to ‘No Future’ as well and the sequencing. For example the closing track ‘Auteur (Outro)’ and its construction and the different sub-sections within it brings everything to a fitting close.

Moiré: Thanks. Yeah, I think it’s interesting how the sequence works on people differently. I don’t know how many people are aware but it’s really like the biggest headache; one thing is to make the track and the other thing is to sequence the tracks if you have several of them, so it makes sense. It’s always the biggest problem like which track will be first and especially with this  kind of abstract concept of vocals on techno beats and the trouble of course for everyone is who is Moire and what is the music and what are the beats and I think it’s like unfortunately because the way things are it’s really difficult sometimes to get it to people because you’re going to be classified as experimental or leftfield dance or whatever.

But I remember when I was growing up in the 90’s and when drum & bass happened in the UK and then in Europe, nobody knew how to dance to it; people leaving the floors, they didn’t know what to do, they didn’t know how to classify this at all. And then fast forward ten years later and it’s like the biggest export from the UK after punk or actually the UK ever had. It’s weird how long it takes for things to break but not in a pop sense but more in terms of having people react to the sounds and compositions and new ideas. It doesn’t have to always be dance and it doesn’t have to be always dancing, just being together in a space and listening to music to be the whole thing. But that’s how the album happened and that’s what my approach was to it.

And of course when I was finishing it everything that I thought would happen in terms of the political changes happened and it was funny because when I spoke with the guys from Ghostly about the current president in America, nobody really thought it would happen. I’m quite socially aware, I come from a standard working class family – even in some standards I would say lower than working class – and I think I understand the basic person and what drives them to make certain decisions and also looking on the politics, I’m quite into it because if affects my life and it affects everyone else’s lif e so I decided that maybe I should engage with it a little bit more and try to understand what’s happening. So this was weird because I called the album ‘No Future’ before any of these things were obvious and then it happened and it was like I didn’t really mean it to be negative or pessimistic in any way. And that’s why the music is not really dark or really depressing because that was never the reason for it to be depressing, it was more about being different and the hinting of something.

The guests who are on the album works so wonderfully and even in terms of where they come in on the album too, the two tracks by DRS are outstanding.

Moiré: Yeah, he did an excellent job and also James Messiah was a totally different thing (in terms of the style) but again he fit perfectly with his message. I  just gave him hints – and with DRS as well – I didn’t have to do any like crazy description of telling them what to do. These collaborations I am very happy about them, they just happened so naturally and it was a really good time just to work with them even over email it was just like ‘click’, they got the vibe and I think that’s when you appreciate how professional people are. How some people basically have that amazing quality of being able to jump on any track and deliver something interesting, I’m really into that.

I’m very curious to know about your equipment and the musical set-up that you’re using?

Moiré: Well the studio I had for this – and I’m still renting – is not my studio but it’s someone else’s who put a lot of work into it. It’s a really amazing room with double walls and it’s kind of a floating box, no windows and it sounds really good. So any imperfections or perfections can be heard and you could be really close to the sound. The room is great and the acoustic treatments is basically excellent and then the speakers actually came with the studio. I used to work in Adams before and on this record these are the speakers that I used. One thing is producing and I go quite often and listen in many different places so at home I have Adams and Dynaudio monitors and then in another place I have a bigger Adams system that I would go and ask my friends if I could use and listen to stuff and then in the studio the speakers that are there I think are Focal CMS65 and they were great. On the back of the room –it’s really clever – other speakers like really bad ones like Mackies, you just listen on the really bad ones as well. So it’s all very compact but perfect. For the vocals of course I made the beats and all the sketches and the MCs would do their thing on them, for example DRS did everything from the internet, I just sent him the beat and he sent me the vocals; it was as simple as that. DRS is based in Manchester so obviously there was a distance issue so email was the best thing. James Messiah is based in south London so he just came on his bike and he just recorded it live over the ‘Facade’ track and that was it. I think we actually did also vocal on ‘Jupiter’ as well but I never finished that, so basically they did their thing.

A lot of the tracks themselves are made live with samplers, a bunch of synths (Moog Nord and JD 800 and Octatrack sampler) and loads of other little synths and boxes that are placked together and I just jam on it until I’m happy with the stuff and then it’s all getting recorded live to old Logic, I still like the old one and so for some reason I’m still using that. And then for production I use Universal Audio, I think their tools are really excellent. It’s all very simple, I don’t have any expensive gear in terms of like crazy compressers that you can see some famous people with and stuff like that, I cannot afford it, I do not have stuff like that [laughs]. I just learned to work with what I have, I mean that was always my concept because as much there is talk about analog versus digital and so on, everyone who makes music knows that even if they’re going to use all the analog gear they’re going to end up having a digital file delivered for mastering and a mastering engineer quite often will use a PC to master it. You can record stuff to tape but it will always go through digital, I mean you will need to have the tape machine and record the tape and then deliver the tape if that’s the sound you’re after. And that fact that we’re dealing with the digital file in my head was always meaning that you can sculpt it the way you want.

The ways you record it are important for me and that’s why having Universal Audio and analog plugins is quite cool and I wish I had some of the hardware but I think for me that’s fine, I like the way it sounds and I like the quality of digital plugins as much as anything else. I may be quite unusual in terms of the way I use this, which is difficult to explain because my whole concept of making music is like obviously pretty much everyone has the same tools and studios are very similar because by default it’s a pair of monitors and some gear but it’s about how you wire stuff and how you plug things and what triggers what and how you play it and this is something that you cannot explain and that’s something that takes time to develop and I think that for everyone is going to be a different process and some people care about certain things and some people don’t like everything is super-tight whereas other people will leave a but of space for loose swing and maybe not accurately cut beats because that’s the idea. Some people record everything live and I do a lot of stuff live, a lot of the tracks happened just as live jams and I would have parts played from a sampler and then parts played from live synth and other synths sequenced together and then everything going through some distortion box and then everything recorded. So that’s pretty much the technical side of how this happened but I think the room is very important for me, the way it sounds for this particular one was important but who knows maybe on the next one I will do just on headphones.

For the live show – and live jams – there must always be new workings and new versions of the various tracks being formed?

Moiré: Yeah, this is true that is happening. I mean for the live aspect of course it allows you to be constantly doing versions and edits and all sorts of things and experiments. My live stage set-up which I’m building right now – but I’ve already played like this for a while – is that I’m trying to bring as much studio gear to the stage as possible. So I’m trying to do what I’m doing in the studio live basically to an extent because you cannot do everything. And there’s certain things you cannot do because it won’t work but that’s the concept and I always loved that; bringing some machines, some toys to the stage and doing edits of the tracks tha have been released. And obviously when you play for the crowd you can also try new stuff and it’s great to do that so you’re not just stuck to doing DJ, you can actually do something else and every show can be different as well.

I was very interested to read on the Ghostly page that Philip K. Dick and his sci-fi stories and the inspiration this had on ‘No Future’?

Moiré: I like this books and I like his dystopian visions. The phenomenal thing about Philip K. Dick is that if you read his books; they’re portraying us moving to mars and all sorts of other things like ‘The Man in the High Castle’ and even if you look on the cover of this book and the American flag and the way it’s portrayed and everything. And the ideas he had; he was predicting a lot of the things that are happening right now and potentially he was predicting a lot of the things that will happen in the future. I mean the ‘Martian Time-Slip’ is this little novel describing our life on mars but some of his books were crazy bonkers like really proper sc-fi but this stuff you read it now and you think we are not so far from it and it’s possible that we are going to do that and there’s actually nothing that futuristic about it anymore. It’s quite funny, us setting up a place in mars, I think we are quite near to doing that and it’s very political as well, they had NATO on mars and all sorts of other things and you’re like, yeah NATO can be on mars, why not? All these kinds of things and issues and problems that actually he was at time writing it he was reflecting the current world problems in his books partly as well like whatever wars were happening on the planet and transforming this to another planet and the same happening, to be more interesting rather than just describing the reality. He’s definitely incredible and I love his work.

As a producer and someone who has so much music in your life, I wonder growing up at what point did you realize you would go down the path of making music yourself?

Moiré: That’s a difficult question. I don’t know, I mean I can only remember when I was growing up when I was a kid I wanted to be in a band and I forced my parents to buy me a guitar and then after a while I was like well maybe the guitar isn’t for me so I think I destroyed that guitar or I did something to it but whilst I was doing it I had a cassette tape deck and I was just recording all the noises of that guitar destruction and I was basically sampling myself doing all this banging as a kid on that tape and not because I had any concept of sampling – I don’t know if sampling was something that was happening – but I was just doing it because I wanted to listen to it myself [laughs]. I was curious about how it’s going to sound if I was going to do this or if I’m going to do that and obviously recording on the tape allowed you to listen to it back and I didn’t loop or anything, I didn’t understand any of these concepts, I was just always into making noise and making something with sound.

And I wanted to be in a band and I was in a band with my friends and we played some punk stuff and all sorts of things. I was always into music like I mean just as a fan buying all sorts of stuff and I was into all sorts of things and also feeling that I always wanted to be a performer because I started doing nights as a promoter with my friends during university and all this kind of stuff and booking bigger DJs to come and play at our parties and then I started opening and being a DJ as well a little bit at the beginning and then my other friends asked me to collaborate with them on some projects. It evolved in that way so in a way to answer your question I was always into it, I was always in it unconsciously, I was following the path and in my case some things happened that pushed me further in that direction and I still do not understand to be honest how some things happen that you do not have control over like OK I’m going to do this now.

There were some other opportunities or I had to do some other work or other directions in my life and suddenly something happened and they disappeared and it’s like OK I think I should be doing music or I should be working with these people. In my case a few things happened like that in life that were really dramatic that in a way I was like OK this is what I am doing or more like I have to do this in a way that I wanted to do it but also life puzzled itself that way. And it’s always been complicated but I guess that’s why my music has a certain attitude and certain abstract concept behind it because it reflects some of the things I go through. So that’s how it all evolved from my early days, it was not always that obvious and it’s still maybe not that obvious even today, I mean I guess anyone can sit there and ask themselves a question ‘Should I be making music?’ I know that people today are growing up thinking like ‘Fuck it, I’m going to be a DJ and I’m going to buy a bunch of techno tracks from Detroit and I’m going to be a DJ’ and a lot of people do that – or electro or whatever that is in a shop – and some of them probably have bigger careers than many other people who are making music. But it’s crazy because if you look at what happened with the digital social medium and how it changed everything.

Someone asked me ‘Is it difficult for people today in the music industry to go forward?’ and if I look on my profile – like some shitty Instagram account or something – every second person that follows me has got a soundcloud account, that says it all; that means that millions of people are doing the same thing and obviously it’s just going to be affecting everyone else and everyone’s going to be affecting each other basically. But that’s the thing it’s always been the path that has been in front of me, I was not planning or I did not have a business plan like I’m going to make millions of dollars making lots of crazy records or something. The thing for me was always like I am expressing myself and I’m going to try to do my best and be the best in the area that I want to be; that’s my goal and I’m still on my way.

Have there been certain records that you’ve been listening to lately?

Moiré: It’s always the most difficult question. There is just loads. Recently I really like these guys Worried About Satan, they’re quite cool. Pye Corner Audio makes some interesting tracks; I heard some of those from a documentary which was cool. I mean there is so much stuff, I’m always going to be listening to any type of jazz stuff; any Coltrane…anything. I always love Moondog, Flying Lotus. The major inspiration was when Actress released his first record – that was great – and that showed that there is a possibility with the music in that kind of fashion. I just listen daily to so many things, loads of old hip-hop as well like Casual, Hieroglyphics, Wu Tang and Mobb Deep and sometimes I come back to these records because I think they’re just so incredible; they had some magic in them like the fire of the new act where there was really no compromise but just really, really well done. And this kind of interesting movements or moments, there isn’t much of it unfortunately at the moment, it’s really difficult to find these kind of acts where they are interesting musically but there is also some movement behind it and I think everything is watered down based on hype, not much of content really. But there are loads of great records out there.

‘No Future’ is out now on Ghostly.

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May 4, 2017 at 8:01 pm

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S02E03 | March mix

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fracturedair_march17

For March’s mixtape we are excited to share two exclusive tracks, by Reykjavík-based composer Valgeir Sigurðsson (Iceland/Bedroom Community) and Berlin-based percussionist and drummer Andrea Belfi (Italy/Float).

Valgeir Sigurðsson releases his hugely anticipated new solo work “Dissonance” (the follow-up to 2013’s mesmerising “Architecture Of Loss” LP) on April 21st via Icelandic independent label Bedroom Community (founded by Sigurðsson in 2006). Recorded and produced between September 2015 and November 2016 at his Reykjavík-based Greenhouse Studios, “Dissonance” confirms Sigurðsson as one of contemporary music’s most gifted and innovative composers in the modern classical realm. “Dissonance” features collaborators Liam Byrne and Reykjavík Sinfonia and features the monumental side-long title-track alongside two separate suites: “No Nights Dark Enough” (in five parts) and the three-part “1875”.

The Italian-born and Berlin-based artist Andrea Belfi releases his sublime full-length “Ore” – excitingly the first for Float – which comprises his finely-honed craft as a gifted drummer and percussionist, using his own trusted sound set-up (a Saari drum-kit from Finland and a Nord modular and sampler). In recent times, Belfi’s name has reached a wider audience while collaborating and touring with the Nils Frahm-led, Berlin-based three-piece Nonkeen (R&S Records). “Ore” will be released on 26 May 2017 via Float.

Numero Group – the ever-indispensable archival and reissue specialists – this month issued the definitive double-album retrospective on The Creation, the short-lived but hugely influential 1960’s mod-rock group. Entitled “Action Painting”, the double-album set features the complete Creation studio recordings as well as tracks from The Creation’s predecessors, The Mark Four (featuring future Kinks bassist John Dalton).

March’s mix also features new releases from: Colin Stetson; Feist; Nathan Fake; Forest Swords; The Shins; Spoon; Demen and Kelly Lee Owens.

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S02E03 | March mix

 

To listen on La Blogothèque:

http://www.blogotheque.net/2017/03/29/fractured-air-x-blogotheque-s02e03-march-mix/

 


01. Nick Cave & Warren Ellis“Mars Theme” (Mars OST, Milan)
02. Andrea Belfi“Lead” (Float)
03. Blanck Mass“Rhesus Negative” (Sacred Bones)
04. Moiré“Auteur (Outro)” (Ghostly International)
05. Lusine“Witness” (feat. Benoît Pioulard) (Ghostly International)
06. Earthen Sea“About That Time” (Kranky)
07. Demen “Niorum” (Kranky)
08. Ben Frost“Impossibilities” (Fortitude OST, SATV Publishing Limited/Sky, Mute)
09. Valgeir Sigurðsson“No Nights Dark Enough II. infamy sings” (Bedroom Community)
10. Feist“Pleasure” (Polydor)
11. The Creation“Through My Eyes” (Numero Group)
12. Spoon“Us” (Matador)
13. The Shins“The Fear” (Columbia)
14. Ennio Morricone“Un Uomo Da Rispettare” (Un Uomo Da Rispettare OST, Superior Viaduct)
15. High Plains“Blood That Ran the Rapids” (Kranky)
16. Kelly Lee Owens “Lucid” (Smalltown Supersound)
17. Forest Swords“The Highest Flood” (Ninja Tune)
18. Nathan Fake“HoursDaysMonthsSeasons” (Ninja Tune)
19. Colin Stetson“In the clinches” (Constellation)
20. Actress“X22RME” (Ninja Tune)
21. FKA Twigs “Hide” (Young Turks)
22. Todd Terje“Jungelknugen” (Four Tet Remix) (Olsen Norway)
23. Peaking Lights“Little Flower” (Two Flowers)
24. Risco Connection“Ain’t No Stopping Us Now” (Soul Jazz)
25. Madlib“Cue 4” (Stones Throw)
26. Little Simz“No More Wonderland” (AGE 101)
27. Rusangano Family“Eyedentity” (Self-Released)

Compiled by Fractured Air, March 2017. The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.

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