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Posts Tagged ‘A Winged Victory For The Sullen

Chosen One: Stars of the Lid

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Interview with Adam Bryanbaum Wiltzie.

“…when it works, it’s a feeling not even of contentment, it’s a sort of cross between accomplishment, contentment, satisfaction and just where you can sit there for a moment and it feels as if the whole world is OK for a few minutes even though the rest of the time it feels as if it’s about to explode.”

—Adam Bryanbaum Wiltzie

Words: Mark Carry

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Since releasing their debut record ‘Music For Nitrous Oxide’ in the mid-nineties, Stars of the Lid have been responsible for creating some of the most ground-breaking, singular and innovative ambient music to have graced the earth’s atmosphere. The innate ability of the gifted duo Adam Wiltzie and Brian McBride to stretch out space that in turn, creates vast, limitless drones steeped in unimaginable beauty. Each Stars of the Lid record remains a vital musical document whose meaning and significance has only deepened with time.

Brian Eno once said “A studio is an absolute labyrinth of possibilities — this is why records take so long to make because there are millions of permutations of things you can do.” It is abundantly clear across the storied career of Wiltzie and McBride’s sacred works that a labyrinth of possibilities permeate the drone soundscapes and intricately arranged symphonic works of monumental works such as 2007’s ‘And Their Refinement of the Decline’ (the band’s last studio album); ‘The Tired Sounds of Stars of the Lid’ (using strings, horns and piano to captivating effect) and ‘The Ballasted Orchestra’s utterly compelling ambient explorations. These albums were painstakingly recorded, processed and assembled over long periods of time (for instance, the band’s last studio album was five years in the making). I feel this has become the essence of Stars of the Lid’s resolutely unique musical oeuvre: the listener feels the creator’s sheer devotion to their chosen art being poured through every divine note and aching pulse.

SOTL’s Adam Wiltzie and Brian McBride will be embarking on an extensive tour to debut some new compositions, and some old classics with long time visual collaborator and projectionist Luke Savisky, and German lighting designer MFO.  On stage this tour will be featuring a new band. Two new members, Robert Donne from Kranky label mates Labradford, and Adam’s long time studio collaborator Francesco Donadello. Plus Brussels residents and A Winged Victory for the Sullen’s string ensemble, the Echo Collective and a vintage Moog 55 Modular Synthesizer.

2016 has already seen Brussels-based Wiltzie provide original scores for a number of feature films including Jalil Lespert’s ‘Iris’, ‘The Yellow Birds’ by Alexandre Moors and Mike Plunkett’s ‘Salero’ (the latter will be released on 11th November 2016 via Erased Tapes).

For full details of Stars of the Lid’s European tour, which kicks off this Saturday (1st October @ Paradiso, Amsterdam) and includes two Irish dates (Cork’s Triskel Arts Centre and Dublin’s National Concert Hall), see HERE.

https://www.facebook.com/starsofthelid

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Interview with Adam Bryanbaum Wiltzie.

I’d love for you to discuss the forthcoming Stars of the Lid European tour itself? It must be very special for you and Brian to be re-united again after being involved with other projects in the interim?

Adam Bryanbaum Wiltzie: So, technically it’s been ten years since we released a record. In the meantime, I’ve been really busy doing a lot more soundtrack work and working with A Winged Victory For The Sullen but at the same time, pretty much every year Brian and I have at least done a couple of shows here and there. So we were always there but I think initially it was intentional to step away from it for a while and try something different so I think more and more we’re kind of getting back into it and getting closer and hopefully we’re going to find a way to finally finish the record and so it’s connect a little bit to both, you know getting our feet wet again. And like I said, we haven’t been completely gone away from it, there’s also this thing connected with the Moog that brought us to do more than just a couple of shows. Having the ability to use this beautiful piece of analogue furniture was sort of the catalyst to make the tour go longer and go to places we haven’t been in a long time – like Ireland – and yeah it’s good to be back.

I’d love for you to discuss a bit more about the synthesizer itself because as you say that must be a real treat to have in your live set-up because normally that might not be possible?

AW: Yeah absolutely, it’s a hugely famous piece of old gear that’s obviously really expensive and fragile and it’s so huge that it’s not really so easy to normally take on tour. We’re really lucky to have this for a really short period of time. I had it in my studio some months ago to test it out and see how we could make it work. We’re going to be playing some new material plus we’re playing some old songs we’ve played throughout the years so it’s nice to breathe some new life into it with some new sounds and in a new way to approach it.

The Moog is a complicated instrument because this one in particular doesn’t have the ability to save pre-sets, so when you get a sound it’ll go away really quick so we’re kind of meeting it halfway. The Moog can very easily turn into some sound that doesn’t sound like anything that we do but there is some inherent beautiful simplicity within the instrument that really fits to what our sound is. It’s been a nice journey to find a way to make it fit inside our world so we’re looking forward to trying that out every night.

Another component too, Adam, is the wonderful string ensemble that audiences would already be familiar with those very special A Winged Victory For The Sullen shows?

AW: Absolutely. The same string players I have been using for a while now, mostly through A Winged Victory For The Sullen. They’ve started playing with Stars of the Lid a few years ago but they live with me, I’m here in Brussels and they’ve become really good friends and they have become a really big part of my live show no matter where I play so it’ll be a real treat to have them along with me as well.

It was cool to see last year Kranky re-issuing some of the Stars of the Lid albums on vinyl, and just a reminder of what special musical documents they very much are.

AW: Yeah, they went out of print. I don’t know if it was really conscious but it seemed a really good time to re-press them on vinyl. It’s been such a long time it’s funny; I figured out that sometimes the best promotion is to do nothing for as long as possible and for some reason we’ve grown in a strangely beautiful organic sense that I never really imagined. For whatever reason those records resonated with people and people care about them so in a weird way this is almost like we’re going back on tour to support those records we released almost twenty years ago [laughs]. It’s nice and as I always say, I’m pretty lucky that people like anything that I do, it’ll be a real pleasure.

I’m curious with the art of a duo – there’s of course you and Brian as Stars of the Lid and alongside Dustin as A Winged Victory – there’s obviously something very special with working or creating together as a two-piece?

AW: Well there’s something two people can do that one person could never do, that’s always the beautiful thing with collaboration. I guess I’ve always been a big believer and big fan of it. I’m lucky to have two guys that I click with in this world.

You already mentioned scores and different things – even more so in the last few years – it’s a wonderful time seeing all these composers with so many projects and varied releases coming out where you’re one prime example. It must be interesting to have all these different projects in your mind at the same time?

AW: I think it’s nice to do different things because you don’t get bored with it whether it’s the different projects or working on something individually like the score project. And obviously as an artist you want to keep busy and not become stagnant so it’s good to have all these different things you can work on.

In terms of the new Stars of the Lid material, can you shed some light on the new material or direction in which you’re going with it?

AW: I don’t really know. We have a lot of new material but I don’t think we have really sat down and decided on what’s actually going to be on the record. In that sense, it’s almost as if we’ve done nothing but we go out on tour sometimes to test out new songs and see what feels like you want to develop more. As far as telling anyone about our new record, there’s actually nothing to report. Everyone seems to think we’re going on tour because we have a new record but we don’t. And everyone also seems to think – it’s a strange thing – that we still live in Texas, I don’t know why that is but they always say the Texan duo, it seems that in the world of the press we will always be existing in Texas.

You already mentioned living in Brussels, you know the studio itself has it been a place that’s been developing over the last few years? I’d love to learn more about the space itself and your set-up?

AW: Yeah I mean I’ve been there for almost twenty years. So, it’s slowly developing – you get new gear and whatnot – it’s basically a really old apartment with really high ceilings and it’s very sympathetic for recording acoustic instruments. Although I do a lot of recording for bigger projects with an orchestra in a studio in Budapest and sometimes I record some strings at another studio in Brussels but I somehow have been able to make it sound like as if you can’t really tell so you can mix and match different things from different places and it feels connected. I’ve always – from the early days – all my earlier recordings were recorded at home because I didn’t have any money, so I’ve always loved recording at home, it’s something that I think I will always do.

The special thing is too with the range of the different material, you know it always has this sort of DIY aesthetic to it too, which is a big compliment too.

AW: Yeah absolutely, it’s all connected. I mean in the beginning, we were so anonymous and we didn’t have any money so we had to do it yourself. So I think it stems from that even though I have a manager now and people who work for me, it still feels strange if I don’t do most of it myself. I feel as if I’m cheating someone if I don’t. My mom told me the other day, she likes to tell me that I remind her of my father because he always had trouble sitting still and so maybe I have adopted a little bit of that from my father. It’s hard to let someone else do something because you just want to do it yourself.

Looking over the Stars of the Lid discography, there’s obviously a string of really amazing records. The length of time it took to make some of these double or even triple records, it must feel like a gradual process when you’re trying to build one piece with so much going on?

AW: I think in the past; songs would develop over a course of years. A two-hour record – you know like a triple album – could take years to make but as I’ve gotten older it seems things happen a lot quicker. I recorded a score this summer – and I’m going over the soundtrack right now to release it – it’s this French film Dustin and I have just composed and it’s over an hour-long and we did all this in about two months. So I think as I’ve gotten older, I’ve found that it’s a little bit easier to let go and not be so precious about everything. I’m not necessarily saying that one is better than the other and I do still slave over things, there are some other music that I’m working on that will take longer and develop. I guess it really depends on the project, you know when you’re working by yourself – for example a soundtrack, it’s a commissioned piece – you have to please other people so you have to find a way to not be precious and let go quicker because there’s deadlines and people have agendas. When you’re working for yourself, you can take all the time in the world.

I always think about when you’re connected to the first [Stars of the Lid] record ‘Music For Nitrous Oxide’, which came out in the early nineties and you had your whole life building up to that one moment, which I was in my early twenties when that came out so it was essentially twenty-three years of my life to release the first record and after that it’s a series of a lot shorter times. So I can see both sides, I do have to say that since I’m professional and that I make a living out of making music, I am relieved in a sense that I can not spend too much time if I need to. I was talking to Jóhann Jóhannsson the other day and he feels as if it doesn’t matter what he has recorded, it never feels finished to him and that must be really stifling at times you know. I like to let go when I can, I think it’s good for you; they’re like these time capsules so you need to let go, otherwise you’ll never finish anything.

It reminds me of Arthur Russell too who always seemed to struggle in order to finish something.

AW: It’s hard to let go sometimes, which I totally understand. You’re making this piece of art and once something doesn’t feel finished it can be very stifling and suffocating, you know it’s better to put it aside and release something that you aren’t happy with because you don’t want to end up feeling like a prostitute or something. What’s the line from that movie, “a wise man once said there’s always a fine line between clever and stupid”, that’s important to remember.

I’ve been listening a lot to your ‘Salero’ soundtrack recently, it’s really amazing and the pieces are just so beautiful. It feels related to other things you have done but it exists in its own realm as well, there’s a separate identity as well.

AW: Yeah maybe, it’s a commissioned piece so I had to work a lot quicker on it but I mean I still think that it sounds like me even though it’s recorded with an orchestra but I’m biased so I don’t know. I don’t know how to feel about it, I’d like to get out of my body and look at myself but sometimes it’s hard to do that. But I’m pleased with it, I’m glad it’s going to come out. I think it’s a beautiful time capsule.

And composing to actual visuals is the process really but in terms of the film then, it feels like a perfect fit where you’re composing music to a vast salt flat?

AW: The first time I saw the images, they were absolutely overwhelming, they’re so beautiful and it’s also kind of strange to see a part of the world that you’ve never seen before. It could maybe look a bit familiar but just have no concept for it, especially the reflections from the sun it looks as if it’s not part of the earth sometimes. It was just so beautiful.

You already mentioned the string orchestra, you must go to that stage after having the compositions pretty much written I imagine but I wonder it must be nice to end up in the same space as the orchestra?

AW: For me, it’s my favourite part because this is the moment where you have this brain fart in your head and you get to let it come out. And just have these other people interpret, it’s going to pretty much sound like you wrote it down, I just absolutely love it. I found this great orchestra – I can’t say they connect with what I’m doing because they are just playing notes – it’s really my favourite part of the whole process because this is where all the happy accidents happen. It sounds like kind of what I was trying to do and you get these other things out of it that you never imagine in a thousand years, you know when you get thirty people in a room to play a drone, it’s absolutely beautiful.

That must be the same feeling for those Stars of the Lid albums where the sessions at the end, you hear all these strings and horns over those drones?

AW: Yeah, it’s different though because that record I mostly recorded in my home studio, not to say that wasn’t a satisfying recording experience but since I’ve been moving more into larger orchestras for the past number of years now, it’s a different thing. I mean there’s one track on the ‘Salero’ record – most of it is recorded with an orchestra except this one track called ‘Bring This Place To Life’ – it’s recorded in my studio with the people who I play with normally and it’s got a totally different sound so the feeling you get when you get people to play on something that you have written – it doesn’t matter if it’s large or small – when it works, it’s a feeling not even of contentment, it’s a sort of cross between accomplishment, contentment, satisfaction and just where you can sit there for a moment and it feels as if the whole world is OK for a few minutes even though the rest of the time it feels as if it’s about to explode. I guess if I meditated on a regular basis, it would be like this moment you come out of meditation and everything is calm. That’s the only way I can describe it, it’s just a feeling of slight contentment.

You have done so much and there’s been so many accomplishments that you should be very proud of, I wonder looking back – and forward too – has there been one philosophy or belief that you always hold onto when you work on the next album, like a musical philosophy so to speak?

AW: Oh my God I definitely do not have but I did read ‘The Oblique Strategies’ by Eno the other day and he has one called ‘Honour your mistakes as a hidden intention’ [laughs] and that one makes complete sense to me [laughs]. I think that’s about as close as I can get to having a theme song.

There’s been several odes to ‘Twin Peaks’ in some of the Stars of the Lid material in terms of song-titles and whatnot, you must have great memories of watching the various David Lynch films and the TV series?

AW:  The Lynch connection was more with ‘Twin Peaks’ because when Brian and I were starting out that was around the time when ‘Twin Peaks’ was on TV so we used to sit there and watch it every week on a Thursday night when it would come on TV. It was a great moment in television history for America. I don’t know if we were the biggest David Lynch fans but we absolutely loved that TV show so that’s why we dedicated that song to him.

Lastly, Adam, what’s been your favourite records that you’ve been enjoying lately?

AW: Well my favourite record that I’ve been listening to is Jóhann Jóhannsson’s new one called ‘Orphee’, it’s absolutely beautiful. He hasn’t released a record of his own work in a long time, it’s gorgeous and I would highly recommend checking it out.

For full details of Stars of the Lid’s European tour, which kicks off this Saturday (1st October @ Paradiso, Amsterdam) and includes two Irish dates (Cork’s Triskel Arts Centre and Dublin’s National Concert Hall), see HERE.

https://www.facebook.com/starsofthelid

Fractured Air 33: Saccade (A Mixtape by Loscil)

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Loscil’s Scott Morgan has been responsible for some of the most captivating and stunningly beautiful ambient creations over the past fifteen years. Across a compelling body of work (beginning with the 2001 classic ‘Triple Point’) – the majority of which has been released on the immense Chicago-based imprint Kranky – Vancouver-based Morgan has developed his own unique style of textural rhythms that ceaselessly blur the lines of ambient, techno, drone and modern-classical. The recently released ‘Sea Island’ marks the latest chapter in Loscil’s explorations through sound that lies at the intersect between nature and humanity.

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Fractured Air 33: Saccade (A Mixtape by Loscil)

To listen on Mixcloud:

https://www.mixcloud.com/Fractured_Air/fractured-air-33-saccade-a-mixtape-by-loscil/

 

Tracklisting:

01. Mica Levi ‘Love’ [‘Under the Skin’ OST/Milan]
02. Rafael Anton Irisarri ‘Will Her Heart Burn Anymore_00’ [Room40]
03. Simon Scott ‘Spring Stars’ [Miasmah]
04. Lawrence English ‘Hapless Gatherer’ [Room40]
05. Hildur Guðnadóttir ‘Strokur’ [Touch]
06. Jon Hopkins ‘Breathe This Air (Asleep version)’ [Domino]
07. A Winged Victory for the Sullen ‘ATOMOS VI’ [Erased Tapes, Kranky]
08. Kyle Bobby Dunn ‘Spem in Alium and Her Unable’ [Students Of Decay]

The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or their respective record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.

 


 

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‘Sea Island’ is available now on Kranky.

http://www.loscil.ca/
http://www.kranky.net/

 

Chosen One: A Winged Victory For The Sullen

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Interview with Adam Wiltzie & Dustin O’Halloran.

“I think that a big element in our music is stretching time and using the element of space.”

—Dustin O’Halloran

Words: Mark Carry

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A Winged Victory For The Sullen is the collaborative project of like-minded artists and musical luminaries, Adam Bryanbaum Wiltzie (Stars Of The Lid) and composer Dustin O’Halloran. Last year marked the highly anticipated return of A Winged Victory For The Sullen’s stunningly beautiful and deeply affecting neo-classical based compositions in the form of the duo’s sophomore effort, ‘Atomos’. First glimpses of the pair’s new material – and follow-up to the mesmerizing eponymous debut, released in 2011 – was beautifully captured in ‘Atomos VII’ EP; comprising two original compositions recorded in the summer of 2013 in Brussels, Berlin and Reykjavik. This stunning release also featured Icelandic composer Ben Frost’s rework – appropriately dubbed ‘Greenhouse Re-Interpretation’ – of ‘Atomos VI’. What remains vividly present on the pair’s newest masterwork of ‘Atomos’ is the infinite beauty and unlimited emotion that pours from the intricately layered compositions of piano, strings, drone sounds and modular synthesizers. A haven of celestial sounds and heart-wrenching emotion unfolds with each and every beguiling piano tone and ambient pulse of heart-wrenching strings. As ever, the gifted duo explore new possibilities through sound with results nothing short of staggering.

Wayne McGregor, founder of Random Dance Company and resident choreographer at the Royal Ballet, approached Adam and Dustin to see if they could write the score for his new oeuvre as part of the Random Dance Company. The duo were given complete artistic freedom and would record more than sixty minutes of music over a four-month period during the summer of 2013 with the assistance of their long-term sound engineer Francesco Donadello. In contrast to the group’s debut full-length, ‘Atomos’ was sculpted in a very short time-period, resulting in a broadened sonic palette containing elements of electronics, harp and synthesizers. In the words of Adam Wiltzie: “We tried to balance the discordance between being creative, and fulfilling our duties for a commissioned soundtrack with a very strict deadline, and all the while staying true to our collective melancholy.”

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For upcoming European/US tour dates click HERE.

‘Atomos’ is out now on Erased Tapes (Europe) and Kranky (USA).

http://www.awvfts.com/
https://www.facebook.com/awvfts

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Interview with Adam Wiltzie & Dustin O’Halloran.

It’s lovely to speak to you about your incredible and very special music. Congratulations on the latest album ‘Atomos’, it’s such an amazing album. The one thing that really striked me initially is the broadened sonic palette where there is new textures and nuances in the music itself. I’d love for you to discuss the different ideas and elements you had envisioned for the album from the outset?

Adam Wiltzie: Yeah I mean I don’t know if there was a really grand scheme because we had such a limited time. I mean the process leading up to it was a little bit slow but once we got everything agreed contractually, we really had four months to do the whole score which is not a lot of time to do anything. So we weren’t consciously thinking this to be totally different from our first record because Wayne [McGregor] approached us because he loved the first record, that’s what brought him to us. But we had a limited amount of time so we were just coming up with ideas and writing so we went into some new keyboard sounds and I think if anything it wasn’t so conscious, it just happened very naturally and in a really quick way. We didn’t have time to second guess ourselves either: we would throw a palette of sound up and start writing and go with it. And you know, it was really as simple as that.

Dustin O’Halloran: Also, I think because Adam and I have our own projects -we’ve only had one record – we were really happy with that first record and you know, we don’t want to repeat ourselves; it was good timing that we had this sort of third influence in the group because I think it helped us understand what are the limits of our sound and where can we grow. The first record in some ways came really easily to us because it was very natural to what we both do so I think that it was nice to see where we can expand in our own palettes.

As you just mentioned there, it must be a lovely feeling to be thinking back on the making of the music in the sense that it took relatively so quickly. It must be this inspiration that you get so easily and quickly when you are both together.

AW: It’s definitely satisfying: satisfying in different ways for each record. I think the satisfaction was different with ‘Atomos‘ – and maybe for Dustin it’s the same – we were working on it and didn’t have much time so it wasn’t until we actually performed live that we realized, oh this actually is a really nice record. We were just trying to finish this score that would work for this dance piece where we were thinking more about Wayne and what he needed, obviously we didn’t want it to sound bad. It wasn’t until we were there, really playing it live where we realized, oh this sounds like a record and now it’s even more satisfying for me that the record really sits on its own completely separate from it: it can sit completely separate from the dance because I think most people that listen to it have never seen the dance and maybe never will see the dance. So it’s satisfying because it’s a beautiful thing that exists on its own.

Exactly and I think that’s a true testament to the music, you know with the different contexts. I would love to see the dance but I haven’t but with the music itself there is such a visual element of movement as you’re listening it feels like you are witnessing it even though on a physical level you’re not.

DO’H: I think the one nice thing about working with dance is that music really comes first so you have a lot of space and time to work with where other collaborations are not as free in the sense of the time-lines. But I think that a big element in our music is stretching time and using the element of space. In film it’s much harder because you’re dealing with stories and edits. It was nice because we were really able to draw out passages and Wayne really gave us a lot of freedom in that sense; he didn’t really try to constrict that way we work.

I love too how the album itself really feels like a number of movements but there is so much variation- there is so many different elements happening and different layers – so you can always hear something new from the music.

AW: Oh, thank you. That’s what we were hoping.

I remember Christina Vantzou saying how the process of composing was both a maddening and meditative experience. What would you feel?

DO’H: I think it depends on how you work but I think the moments that were difficult were more just based on the time. Our first record when we had all time that we needed and we took all the time we needed, it never felt stressful in any way and was really a great pleasure. Punching all that in a much shorter period of time had its challenges but I think if you let it come it comes to you at some point.

I’d be curious to know if you’re influenced particularly by Steve Reich and his gradual music philosophy?

AW: Not really. We were asked this question I think by a woman in Australia – someone recently asked us – I mean obviously I’ve known about Steve Reich but I never really listened to him; he was never much of an influence me; I was always much more into Eno- that was more of my influences for minimalism when I was young but he makes beautiful music, he’s a super-friendly guy but I never really had a signature emotional moment with Steve’s music. But saying that, art is strangely subjective in ways that I’m telling you this and you’re probably saying ‘this guy is totally fooled, he must have listened to Reich‘ you know, it seems so obvious but that’s the funny thing, at this point in history maybe I’m influenced by someone else who was influenced by him maybe; it’s all so cross-pollinating at this point it’s hard to tell where your musical history comes from.

DO’H: And you know also there is an artist named Hans Otte who was working with a lot of similar ideas that Steve Reich worked with later but he was doing it I think like in the 60’s so I think a lot of people were dealing with similar ideas. I mean it’s the same for me I wouldn’t say that was an obvious influence for me as well.

I’d be curious was there a certain Brian Eno record that triggered your love for his music?

AW: Oh I mean there is so many of them. His pop records, ‘Here Come The Warm Jets’, ‘Another Green World’, ‘Before and After Science’ and his ambient records obviously, I love ‘Discreet Music‘ and ‘Thursday Afternoon’, there are so many. Even some Roxy Music I can get into.

When you find yourself in the live setting and you have the wonderful orchestra and everything with you, it must be a real thrill for you just going on tour and witnessing obviously the music you have made in this live context?

AW: Yeah it’s been great. We have a really great set of string players that worked with us on the record and we’ve been playing with for a while now. We’re still playing the music from the piece but it has developed in a way because we’ve been playing it so much together, we really feel more like a band now so it’s been really rewarding and great to really bond and connect with string players we’ve had so we feel really lucky.

DO’H: Instead of working with them on our first record when we had the new material it was the first time that we were able to bring string players in and that were more invested than just being session players; they really understood how we were working and they recorded all the string parts with us. It was nice because we were able to work with them on how to make it better and usually with string players you get that sort of personal investment so it was really nice to feel like we could all make it better and craft it together and it really helped make these pieces work.

I wonder what kind of plans and ideas you may have for your next projects?

DO’H: Well I think Adam’s going to be working on some of his music and I’m going to be working on some of my own music now.

AW: Yeah we’re going to take a little break and work on our own things for a little while. We’ll be back, we’ll do it again- don’t you worry.

In terms of music or film, was there something you’ve been obsessed with in recent months?

DO’H: Well recently I was in Los Angeles and I saw the composer Mica Levi and she had a twenty-piece ensemble and she performed the score for ‘Under The Skin‘. Actually when I saw the film I thought the music was good but when I saw it live and saw how she was creating her sound live, it was definitely one of the coolest things I’ve seen for a really long time and I really appreciated how she created all of the sounds.

AW: What was she playing?

DO’H: She was conducting and she had the Wordless Orchestra playing and they were great. She’s just dealing with more textures than melodic lines and there was a few melodic parts but the way she creates them and doubles the instruments, it was definitely like one of the most interesting things I have seen in a long time, it was pretty cool.

What about you Adam?

AW: I’m really into gardening at the moment. Although I still love music and film and art, I’ve really just become obsessed with plants lately; they seem to speak to me more loudly than anything else.

That sounds cool because I’m sure you get enough inspiration from the world outside as much as anything else.

DO’H: I think you always have to give yourself a break from music sometimes, it’s always seeking influence within music itself is like a snake eating its own tail and sometimes you just need to step away and you know, spend time in the ocean, garden or just listen to other sounds and just get outside this world of music. And I think that’s what brings fresh ideas too, you need to just step out of it, go to a museum and see art, just read [laughs] and just step away from it.

Especially when you have so much stuff always hapening – even away from A Winged Victory – as your work builds up there’s a sort of challenge to create something new. Actually it reminds me of a recent interview with Hauschka where Volker explained how he needs to “reset his mind” and having a blank canvas to start from.

AW: I mean Volker is so good at that. He’s also really good at improvisation which I struggle with a bit, I don’t trust myself enough, I don’t think. He’s very inspiring especially his tour he’s been doing lately. I don’t know if you’ve seen it? I mean it’s super beautiful where he’s going lately and I love his recent live set. It’s pretty special.

 


 

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For upcoming European/US tour dates click HERE.

‘Atomos’ is out now on Erased Tapes (Europe) and Kranky (USA).

http://www.awvfts.com/
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Written by markcarry

February 13, 2015 at 11:59 am

Mixtape: This Uneven Thing [A Fractured Air Mix]

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thisuneventhing_sleeve

This Uneven Thing [A Fractured Air Mix]

To listen on Mixcloud:

http://www.mixcloud.com/Fractured_Air/this-uneven-thing-a-fractured-air-mix/

 

Tracklisting:

01. Antonio Sanchez ‘Get Ready’ [‘Birdman’ OST/Warner Jazz]
02. A Winged Victory For The Sullen ‘ATOMOS I’ [Erased Tapes/Kranky]
03. Ariel Kalma ‘Almora Sunrise’ [RVNG Intl]
04. Alasdair Roberts ‘This Uneven Thing’ [Drag City]
05. Teho Teardo ‘The Outside Force’ [‘Ballyturk’ OST/Specula]
06. Erik K Skodvin ‘Shining, Burning’ [Sonic Pieces]
07. Black to Comm ‘Hands’ [Type]
08. A New Line (Related) ‘The Slow Sound of Your Life’ [Home Assembly Music]
09. Kiasmos ‘Bent’ [Erased Tapes]
10. Thom Yorke ‘Guess Again!’ [Self-Released]
11. Antonio Sanchez ‘Doors and Distance’ [‘Birdman’ OST/Warner Jazz]
12. Charles Mingus ‘Slop’ [Columbia]
13. Mogwai ‘The Lord Is Out of Control’ (Nils Frahm Remix) [Rock Action]
14. Peter Broderick ‘Colours of the Night (Satellite)’ (Greg Haines Dub Mix) [Bella Union]
15. Noel Ellis ‘Memories’ [Summer/Light In The Attic]

The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or their respective record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.

Fractured Air. The universe is making music all the time.

Mixcloud / Facebook / Twitter

 

 

Mixtape: I Set My Face To The Hillside [A Fractured Air Mix]

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isetmyfacetothehillside_front

I Set My Face To The Hillside [A Fractured Air Mix]

To listen on Mixcloud:

http://www.mixcloud.com/Fractured_Air/i-set-my-face-to-the-hillside-a-fractured-air-mix/

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Tracklisting:

01. Alexandre Desplat ‘The Heroic Weather-Conditions of the Universe, Pt. 1: A Veiled Mist’ [‘Moonrise Kingdom’ OST / ABKCO]
02. Calexico ‘Frontera /Trigger’ (Live) [City Slang / Anti-]
03. Tortoise ‘I Set My Face To The Hillside’ [Thrill Jockey]
04. Igor Stravinsky ‘L’Oiseau de feu (The Firebird Suite): Rondo (Corovod)’ [Revised 1945 Version] [CBS]
05. Lambchop ‘The Distance From Her To There’ [City Slang / Merge]
06. Karen Dalton ‘Take Me’ [Light In The Attic]
07. Emahoy Tsegué-Maryam Guèbrou ‘Evening Breeze’ [Buda Musique]
08. Grouper ‘Clearing’ [Kranky]
09. Choir of Downside School, Purley, Emanuel School Wandsworth, Boys’ Choir & London Symphony Orchestra ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Op. 64: On the Ground, Sleep Sound’ [‘Moonrise Kingdom’ OST / ABKCO]
10. Oneohtrix Point Never ‘Still Life’ [Warp]
11. PASSAGE ‘Poem To The Hospital’ [Anticon]
12. The Notwist ‘Neon Golden’ (Console Remix) [City Slang]
13. Kiasmos ‘Swayed’ [Erased Tapes]
14. A Winged Victory for the Sullen ‘ATOMOS II’ [Erased Tapes / Kranky]
15. Jack Hardy ‘The Tailor’ [Numero Group]

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The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or their respective record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.

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Fractured Air. The universe is making music all the time.

Mixcloud / Facebook / Twitter

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Step Right Up: Rival Consoles

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Interview with Ryan Lee West.

“I don’t like to construct an illusion, I like the parts to feel special from a less is more approach.”

—Ryan Lee West

Words: Mark Carry

Rival Consoles - press photo_by Lenka Rayn H. Fine Art Photography_PRINT

The closing note on the inner sleeve of the ‘Erased Tapes V Collection’ – a celebration of the pioneering independent label’s first five years reads: “At the end of all music happiness will be erased.” Over a short space of time, the listener and early Erased Tapes music explorer alike, have been blessed to cross paths with such a gifted family of music-makers that have served a trusted companion to each and every turn of day and close of night.

2014 marked the continuation of this special journey with releases from London-based singer-songwriter, Douglas Dare (the wonderful debut full-length ‘Whelm’ in addition to several mesmerising EP’s), the enthralling, dub-based collaborative project of Greg Gives Peter Space (the gifted duo of renowned artists, Peter Broderick and Greg Haines), and soon-to-be-released full-length releases from A Winged Victory For The Sullen (‘Atomos VI’) and Kiasmos (‘Burnt’). In addition, earlier this month saw the eagerly-awaited arrival of Rival Consoles’ (aka Londoner Ryan Lee West) latest EP, entitled ‘Sonne’, – and follow-up to last year’s ‘Odyssey’ EP – an exploration of atmosphere, space and the power of colour with his analogue set-up of the Moog, Prophet and tape delay, and a central desire to create a more organic, humanised sound. As ever, the music contained on ‘Sonne’ reveals an artist’s desire – and innate musical capabilities – to transcend space and time, as an enriching experience is beautifully carved out in the shimmering canvas of sound, just like footprints in the sand.

The glorious title-track, ‘Sonne’ is built on layers of synth patterns that unveils a delicate beauty with each gorgeously-rendered melody and rich dappling of colour contained therein. A softness and tenderness lies at the heart of ‘Sonne’ that gradually transforms into a pulsating ambient tour-de-force, reminiscent of Aphex Twin’s ‘Selected Ambient Works’. The lead single ‘3 Chords’ is a kaleidoscope of enchanting sounds that feels a close companion – existing in a parallel orbit perhaps – to the synth-based works of label-mate, Nils Frahm such is its monumental beauty. ‘Helios’ contains that special spark and driving momentum of UK’s Fuck Buttons as waves of sound and rhythm ascends into the forefront of the mix.

Part B of ‘Sonne’ reveals the musical journey’s most formidable moments. ‘Haunt’ is one of those electronic-based tracks that immediately leaves you dumbfounded. I’m reminded of a previous interview with Nils Frahm where he explained his desire to “translate music into psychology” where the audience would “feel like anything’s possible”. Certainly, this is the case for not only the shape-shifting creations sculpted by Germany’s Nils Frahm but London’s Ryan Lee West too (and indeed the entire roster of Erased Tapes). A dimension of other-worldly proportions is attained here on ‘Haunt’, particularly later on as the live instrumentation of drums and acoustic guitar blends with the soaring synth-based patterns. Music’s endless possibilities shine forth like the ceaseless array of sound waves (and power of colour) captured masterfully by West.

The closer ‘Recovery’ transports me back to an older recording of Rival Consoles, entitled ‘Daddy’ – a haven of electronic bleeps and glitches featuring label-mate Peter Broderick on vocals – combining the synthetic and organic, resulting in something deeply affecting and human. Gentle ripples of synths serve the opening notes to ‘Recovery’ as a sense of healing and solace prevails. As ever, West’s compositions traverses the human space.

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Sonne’ by Rival Consoles is available now on Erased Tapes.

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https://www.facebook.com/rivalconsoles
http://www.erasedtapes.com

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Rival Consoles - studio shot

Interview with Ryan Lee West.

Congratulations Ryan on the incredible ‘Sonne’  EP. After a string of sublime EPs released in a relatively short period of time, your music is constantly evolving and taking on new forms- all the while, a deeply humanised foundation remains at the core. Firstly, please talk me through the new tracks on ‘Sonne’ and if your process or technique –  in creating these sounds – changed in anyway from your previous works?

Ryan Lee West: Thanks! Glad you like it. A very similar approach from Odyssey continued, both are concerned with finding minimal, emotive electronic ideas. The main difference to me is that Odyssey was darker and consistently moody, with this Sonne I tried to use more colour: sounds that feel more vibrant and brighter, hence Sonne (meaning Sun in german), because the title track and others have a lot of light and warmth in them. There is quite a range of techniques throughout the EP, I tend not to milk one technique, for example Sonne is a layered melodic journey of synths almost like a quartet. And this achieves everything through melody and harmony, where as 3 Chords and Helios are about the sound of the parts, the distorted synths rising, recordings of switches, clicks, guitars, vocals, chopped up and recoiled to make shimmering details etc. Recovery is actually born from Philip on Odyssey. because I wasn’t finished with this rapid synth idea. This is the most considered point on the release, where every single chord is placed in time and out of time to form these changes in speed and density, it took a long time to get this right because I need it to sound natural.

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One aspect I love about the latest EP is the presence of live drums and acoustic guitar, in addition to the shimmering electronics. It is obvious listening to your unique blend of electronic music that a huge amount of care, time and attention to detail pours into the music. For these tracks, would the starting point often be an electronic loop and then a case of adding layers? I imagine the instrumentation of drums/guitar is added later? Would there be a significant amount of splicing tracks, and adding/removing layers before the final sonic creation is fully realized?

RLW: Exactly that, though I don’t really work in loops per say. I tend to improvise out a long sequence of ideas and then improvise a second sequence over the top, then if anything interesting has happened I start to construct a sense of structure. But I’m constantly recording in little moments of ambience, or details like drums, guitar etc. The problem is I don’t like over laboured music, so I might add a bunch of stuff, delete a bunch of stuff, but the end result will not be complex to me. I don’t like to construct an illusion, I like the parts to feel special from a less is more approach.

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Your music always enters this special dimension of radiance. For example, the seamless layers contained on ‘Haunt’ evoke a stunningly beautiful world of sound where the listener gets beautifully lost in. I feel your label-mates such as Nils, Peter, and Ólafur all share this innate ability to transcend space and time through the musical compositions you create. Forgive the generalness of the question but I would love to gain an insight into how you see or visualize music? Has the creative process changed in any way for you since the inception of Rival Consoles project?

RLW: Thanks! I usually hear music as a structure I guess, as you get so used to thinking about structure and layering. I think when I first started I was making music it was a product of the latest tricks I learnt and liked. So there is a sense of the music being made up of techniques rather than any kind of meaning. As I’ve got older, I am needing a little more meaning or a more considered angle. so I have thousands of ideas/ techniques/ production ideas in my head, but I think well why would I choose one over the other or any at all? So I guess I am more questioning about what I include. But this doesn’t mean that there are no accidents. I do a lot of improv and some great moments appear that I love. I think I’ve always been interested in a composition achieving something interesting, but as I’ve got older I need to feel that a recording has captured a performance or sensation of something happening. This is my problem with a lot of electronic music is that people spend loads of time editing and effecting and tweaking details to form the illusion of capturing a moment, I prefer to try and create a moment with a more natural approach.

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Can you please take me back to when your fascination with sound began. I would think this started from an early age? Did you start composing music using digital or analogue?

RLW: I started learning guitar when I was 12, and I was really obsessed with learning to play new music. I got pretty good quickly. but I always remember wanting to make music and not to just play it, I have composed music since then really, but I haven’t really had much guidance in this until I was at university, where I was shown a whole world of possibility. So I guess I started with analogue (guitars/bands), I didn’t start making music with a computer until nearly 10 years later! and then it was very much digital for me. But over time it has become more 50/50.  I only use 2 analogue synths now through a chain of hardware,you can make good music with just a laptop if you have god ideas though. For me it is about physically things to play with. I’m not elitist about analogue vs digital at all.

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In terms of electronic music then, what were the early days like experimenting with IDM, glitch and dance? What records during this time made a big impact on you?

RLW: Aphex Twin Come to Daddy EP – incredibly diverse collection of ideas, from the brutality of Come to Daddy, to the softness of Flim, the intelligent exponential rhythms of Bucephalus Bouncing Ball and the nostalgic vibes of Iz Us, I just think the ideas are inspiring and exciting, this made me think about exploring the sounds of instruments more, it’s easy to get a synth sounding ok, but to make it sounds unique takes lots of time and thinking, so this EP made me want to explore this.

Clark Body Riddle – this is the best electronic album ever made in my opinion, it has everything, Herzog is the greatest track. rich, yet simple through line, swelling, pulsating, organic, heavy, melodic, atmospheric, it just does everything I want in such thoughtful ways! It is my favourite electronic composition ever.

Radiohead Kid A – I was a huge fan of Radiohead when OK Computer came out, I would learn all the guitar parts and play them in bands with friends at school. When Kid A came out I didn’t understand it fully, I didn’t like that they had abandoned guitars, but as the years went by I understood what was going on. It’s a very unique album that has it’s own world of sounds and ideas.

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As an accomplished sound designer, you have frequently performed at the Tate, and recently created a bespoke audio-visual performance for Boiler Room at the V&A. I would love to gain an insight into the whole area of sound design, Ryan? Would this aspect of sound design feed its way into your solo project of Rival Consoles, or is it a case of each one having a synergistic effect on each other?

RLW: Lots of sounds that are in modern electronic music are influenced by film, people realised long ago that capturing sounds can be used in a musical way very effectively. I’m always looking for sounds which behave like other things but are different. So instead of using a bass drum I recently have been recording the hammers on my piano falling to a resting position and then compressing the hell out of this! And adding lots of bass etc. I record lots of clicks and switch sounds with a contact microphone to use as percussion. I’m actually in the process of building a board of different switches so I can play this kind of sound live. I guess for me it’s usually to accompany an idea rather than being the idea itself.

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It’s difficult to highlight just one track on the new EP but I adore the closing piece, ‘Recovery’ and the gorgeous electronic loops that build continually throughout. There is a real sense of a climax to the journey here, especially when the analogue synthesizer layer is added, bringing to mind Laurie Spiegel’s pioneering works. Please talk me through this particular song and the construction (or de-construction) of ‘Recovery’?

RLW: I wanted to create a track that messed with sense of time, like time compressing and expanding, but retaining some general direction, this is basically the same technique as used in Bucephalus Bouncing Ball but instead of applying this to rhythm I apply it to harmony so I have repeating chords, which I drew into the computer as midi, which have complex timing and then I drew in huge curves of velocity which also opened the filter. And then basically the computer plays the analogue synth and I record it back into the computer, whilst slightly messing with other parameters like tape delay and pitch. It’s very simple as a process, it’s just very hard to write the right chord progression with the right pace and the right sense of direction. The rest of the track I played in live over the top of existing parts to get it more human. Apart from the drums which are just arranged like a collage.

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In terms of your live performance, I would love to know what is your live set-up? Is there a certain amount of live improvisation, Ryan? It must be a wonderful feeling when you witness a certain piece of music change or transform into new ways, depending on the moment in time the concerts are occurring?

RLW: I have run Ableton which plays back hundreds of stems, little loops, patterns, etc so I can construct tracks differently live, but as I play the prophet a lot, I tend to keep things stripped back live, for example, I have recently been finishing shows with just a contact microphone loop I make and then a improvised wall of synthesis. This is something I have been working on everyday for the past month or so, I have got to a stage where I could improvise a whole set, but the issue is that the musical ideas wouldn’t be as strong as my thought out work, so its about finding a balance between the two. I plan in the future to make it fully live, with other musicians, because that is where the magic happens.

Equipment list: laptop, prophet 8, copycat tape delay, boss dd3, midimurf, boss od3, contact mic, loop pedal, secret granular pedal* and 2 midi controllers.

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Lastly, please discuss the albums you’ve been listening to most these days?

RLW: I’ve been listening to Dawn of Midi, I was late getting round to them. But love some of the things they achieve.

Buke and Base – I heard/saw them at Halden Pop festival and was blown away! I love their 2 albums, incredible melodies and song writing and catchiness and technical moments.

 


 

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‘Sonne’ by Rival Consoles is available now on Erased Tapes.

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https://www.facebook.com/rivalconsoles
http://www.erasedtapes.com

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Written by markcarry

September 30, 2014 at 3:21 pm

Ten Mile Stereo

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A Winged Victory For The Sullen ‘ATOMOS VII’ (Erased Tapes/Kranky)
This April marks the hugely anticipated return of the impeccable duo of A Winged Victory For The Sullen as a co-release between London-based independent label Erased Tapes and the Chicago-based Kranky label. Comprising the majestic talents of the duo Adam Bryanbaum Wiltzie (Stars Of The Lid) and pianist Dustin O’Halloran, ‘ATOMOS VII’ is bound to capture — just like it’s glorious self-titled predecessor — the imagination of every single music listener lucky enough to cross paths with it. As O’Halloran has stated: “We never imagined 2013 would be such an explosively creative year. The first record took us two years from start to finish, but in the micro span of time over last summer we were able to change the formula for the way we write, record, and let go. It was incredibly liberating.”

‘ATOMOS VII’ is available on 28 April via Erased Tapes/Kranky.

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Christina Vantzou ‘No.2’ (Kranky)
Kansas-born artist, film-maker, musician and composer, Christina Vantzou returns this year with the spellbinding ‘No.2’, and follow-up to her equally gorgeous debut ‘No.1’, released at the beginning of 2012 on the Chicago-based label Kranky. Made over a four-year period, ‘No.2’ sees Vantzou re-unite with Stars Of The Lid and Winged Victory For The Sullen’s Adam Bryanbaum Wiltzie and the internationally renowned arranger Minna Choi of the San Francisco based Magik*Magik Orchestra. ‘No.2’ also features the addition of further instrumentation (previously not heard on it’s predecessor) with the use of bassoon, oboe, and an enhanced string section augmenting Vantzou’s timeless and dreamlike floating worlds.

‘No.2’ is available now on Kranky.

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Sharon Van Etten ‘Are We There’ (Jagjaguwar)
Available 27 May on Jajjaguwar, ‘Are We There’ is Brooklyn-based songwriter Sharon Van Etten’s follow-up to her monumental ‘Tramp’ LP from 2012. Thus far, ‘Taking Chances’ has been made available online, revealing a less stark and cleaner sound, yet remaining as utterly captivating and wholly engaging as always. Check out Van Etten’s official website HERE for some wonderful pre-order bundles, including clear vinyls, limited edition 7″, and signed prints of photographic cover art by Van Etten.

‘Are We There’ is available on 27 May via Jagjaguwar.

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Hauschka ‘Abandoned City’ (City Slang)
The impeccable talents of German composer Volker Bertelmann has been widely evident for many years now via Bertelmann’s Hauschka guise. Using the prepared piano as his starting point (Bertelmann positions pieces of foil or paper on the strings of his grand upright piano to create new sounds), Bertelmann has been wowing audiences far and wide over the last decade or so. ‘Abandoned City’ is Hauschka’s latest full-length, available via Berlin-based independent label City Slang (Calexico, Lambchop, The Notwist) and was recorded at his home studio over the course of ten days following the birth of his first son. Talking about the album’s title, Bertelmann has said: “I was interested in finding a metaphor for the inner tension I feel when I’m composing music, a state of mind where I’m lonely and happy at the same time.”

‘Abandoned City’ is available now on City Slang.

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ORCAS ‘Yearling’ (Morr Music)
ORCAS comprise the duo of Thomas Meluch (Benoît Pioulard) and Rafael Anton Irisarri (The Sight Below), who release ‘Yearling’, their hugely anticipated follow-up to their Morr Music 2012 debut ‘Carrion’. For it’s wonderful follow-up, ‘Yearling’, Meluch and Irisarri are joined by Martyn Heyne (of Efterklang) on guitar and piano, and Michael Lerner (Telekinesis) revealing a gorgeous sonic tapestry and an infinite array of emotions throughout, amounting to another pristine, understated sonic gem.

‘Yearling’ is out April 4th in Europe and April 15th in the US on Morr Music.

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The Delines ‘Colfax’ (Decor / El Cortez)
Led by Richmond Fontaine’s principle songwriter, the novelist Willy Vlautin, The Delines are the newly-formed group featuring Vlautin alongside his Fontaine drummer Sean Oldham, Amy Boone (The Damnations), Jenny Conlee (The Decemberists), Tucker Jackson and Freddy Trujillo. Thus far, the single ‘I Won’t Slip Up’ has been revealed, featuring the stunning vocals of The Damnations’ Amy Boone, the gorgeously soulful and late-night feel echoes Richmond Fontaine’s ‘We Used to Think the Freeway Sounded Like a River’ while the heartfelt lyrics (“I get so tired of people / Always worrying about me”) are typical Vlautin; imperfect and true and straight from the heart. The Delines will have a new 7″ single out on record store day called “The Oil Rigs At Night” which features two tracks not on the forthcoming album. The Delines will tour the UK and Ireland this June (tour dates HERE).

‘Colfax’ will be available on Decor on 01 May 2014.

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Lavender Country ‘Lavender Country’ (Paradise Of Bachelors)
This year North Carolina-based label Paradise Of Bachelors re-release Patrick Haggerty’s hugely affecting landmark 1973 self-titled LP by Lavender Country. As Paradise Of Bachelors say: “Widely recognized as the first openly gay country music album—and cited as such even by Nashville institutions like the Country Music Hall of Fame and CMT—the landmark self-titled 1973 LP by Lavender Country stands as nothing less than an artifact of courage, a sonic political protest document of enormous power, clarity, and grace. The record reflects Haggerty’s experiences: his upbringing on a tenant dairy farm in rural Washington, on the Canadian border; his dismissal from the Peace Corps on the spurious grounds of his sexuality; and his righteous struggles as an outraged young gay man navigating the Pacific Northwest in the immediate aftermath of Stonewall.”

‘Lavender Country’ is available on 25 March via Paradise Of Bachelors.

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Cate Le Bon ‘Mug Museum’ (Turnstile)
Cate Le Bon is an artist hailing from Carmarthenshire, rural West Wales and is currently a resident of Highland Park, Los Angeles, having relocated across the pacific to record her latest album ‘Mug Museum’. Her first album ‘Me Oh My’ was released on Gruff Rhys’s Irony Bored label in 2009 and was followed by ‘CYRK’ (OVNI/Turnstile) which was released to widespread acclaim in 2012 and saw her play live across the world. A frequent collaborator, Cate Le Bon has added vocals to the likes of Neon Neon and Manic Street Preachers in recent times, while Perfume Genius contributes vocals on ‘I Think I Knew’.

‘Mug Museum’ is available now on Turnstile.

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Valentin Stip ‘Sigh’ (Other People)
Montreal’s Valentin Stip has quietly released one of the finest electronic albums of the year thus far in the form of ‘Sigh’, available now on Nicolas Jaar’s Other People label. Valentin Stip’s story thus far is best surmised by Stip’s Soundcloud profile:
“My name is Val, I was born in Paris. I started playing piano when I was seven. Missing my piano too much in Montreal, I started playing around with the musical abilities of my computer and have been making electronic music since then…”

‘Sigh’ is available now on Other People.

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Woods ‘With Light And With Love’ (Woodsit)
Brooklyn’s beloved folk collective Woods have been amassing a wonderfully enduring and timeless body of music since the band’s formation in 2005. Albums such as ‘Sun And Shade’ and ‘Bend Beyond’ have introduced the band to new waves of fans and admirers over the years, enchanted by the band’s “DIY” ethos, impeccable musicianship and an innate appreciation for melody. As Wooden Wand’s James Jackson Toth has said: “With Light And With Love is an album of deeply psychedelic, deeply satisfying songs for a new age of searchers, of Don Juan and Animal Chin alike.”

‘With Light And With Love’ is out April 15th on Woodsist Records.

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