FRACTURED AIR

The universe is making music all the time

First Listen: “Permanently Midnight” by The Gentleman Losers (album teaser)

leave a comment »

We are delighted to premiere the new album teaser by Finnish duo The Gentleman Losers. This beautifully shot video is the first official announcement of the Helsinki-based band’s soon-to-be-released third studio album ‘Permanently Midnight’ (scheduled for release on 8th December 2017 via Estonian boutique label Grainy Records). The Gentleman Losers possess an uncanny ability to capture unfathomable beauty through the art of sound – as captured on the band’s first two utterly captivating studio albums – where endless subtle details are interwoven in the sonic tapestries of their shape-shifting compositions. The brand new track sees electronics added to the mix, with gorgeous strings, reverb-laden piano notes and ghostly guitar, representing a beautiful first glimpse into ‘Permanently Midnight’s otherworldly, far-reaching world.

gl_pm_web

 

The Gentleman Losers is an experimental musical group formed in 2004 by the Finnish brothers Samu and Ville Kuukka. Since then they’ve released spellbinding music on several labels including Büro, City Centre Offices, Warp, Nothings66 and Standard Form. Their two full-length releases – 2006’s self-titled debut album and 2009’s sophomore effort “Dustland” – have been universally acclaimed, winning the hearts of many esteemed music-lovers worldwide, while also being championed by such independent music stalwarts as Germany’s Nils Frahm and UK’s Bibio. The forthcoming third record – the brothers’ latest venture into blissful instrumental music of unknown pleasures – is due to be released this December via Estonian boutique label Grainy Records, in what is destined to become (just like the band’s first two albums) a timeless classic. The Gentleman Losers’ self-titled debut album is available now on Büro; follow-up “Dustland” is also available now on City Centre Offices.

‘Permanently Midnight’ will come out on December 8th on the Estonian boutique label Grainy Records, on vinyl, CD, DL, and a limited edition CD with a photo book of pictures by Samu and Ville.

Pre-order “Permanently Midnight” by The Gentleman Losers HERE.

 

https://www.facebook.com/TheGentlemanLosers/
https://soundcloud.com/the-gentleman-losers

Written by admin

October 19, 2017 at 2:35 pm

Central And Remote: This Is How We Fly

leave a comment »

The idea of foreign fields appeals to me in both directions – the strangeness of the vast acres over there, but the memory too of every blade of grass back home, every ditch, gripe and clump of rushes.”

Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh

Words: Mark Carry

tihwf pic1

The live performances of contemporary folk quartet This Is How We Fly forever fill you with awe-struck wonder and inspiration. The gifted quartet of Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh (hardanger d’amore), Seán Mac Erlaine (clarinets and electronics), Nic Gareiss (percussive dance) and Petter Berndalen (drums) have created their own unique musical language – ever since their self-titled debut dropped in 2013 – with a deep understanding and rich chemistry forever inherent between its members. An evolution it seems is always happening between the players and the band’s latest sophomore release ‘Foreign Fields’ marks a masterful exploration into new sonic plains that delves deeper (than ever before) into enchanting realms of new possibilities.

The opening notes of  ‘A Man Of Few Words’ begins with hushed fiddle notes and delicate percussive dance, before warm textures of electronics and Berndalen’s drums ascend into the ethereal mix. Ó Raghallaigh’s deeply poignant and mournful fiddle notes brilliantly close the piece. Each breath, pulse and texture of ‘The Bittersweet March’ is a joy to savour: the heavenly blend of woodwind and strings amidst the soaring crescendo of drums and percussion (towards the final section) harkens to a symphony of celestial sounds.

Some of the band’s strongest works are beautifully captured on ‘Foreign Fields’ (which was recorded live in Dublin’s Fumbally Stables). ‘Ri Rua’ is an uplifting, heartfelt  lament with a vast array of colours and textures swarming across the sonic space: the duet between MacErlaine’s clarinet and O’ Raghallaigh’s hardanger d’amore is steeped in jazz, folk and classical flourishes. The way the piece transforms and continually builds is further heightened by the myriad of rhythmic textures masterfully supplied by Gareiss and Berndalen.

To trace the origins of the sounds unleashed by This Is How We Fly is a near-impossible task. One of the great hallmarks of their musical identity is the boundless nature of their musical framework: age-old traditions of Swedish folk music and Appalachian music, Irish tradtional are embedded somewhere deep in the foundations but most importantly, many experimental and contemporary sounds and nuances seep into the music, like the river finding its sea. I feel this becomes the essence of ‘Foreign Fields’ and a piece such as ‘Ti Mor’ epitomises the bold spirit of the quartet’s latest masterwork. The hypnotic, trance-like rhythms – which feels rooted deep in Africa – creates an utterly transcendent electronic exploration. The deep dialogue between Gareiss and Berndalen as the footwork and drums become one sound-world of dark, menacing textures. The brooding strings further adds to the cinematic brilliance of this piece, shifting between dub and electronic sound worlds.

The last couple of This Is How We Fly live shows I’ve witnessed, the group played in the round, so the audience and musicians effectively became one. The musicians – and audience alike – share the same experience, feeling each other’s heart beat to the sumptuous textures and sonic timbres to the quartet’s empowering musical journey. It’s precisely this image that encapsulates their remarkable latest full-length where each and every breath is shared, in turn by musician and listener alike.

‘Foreign Fields’ is available NOW.

http://www.thisishowwefly.net/

https://www.facebook.com/ThisIsHowWeFly/

tihwf2

Interview with This Is How We Fly.

 

 Congratulations on the truly sublime sophomore release ‘Foreign Fields’, it’s such a remarkable and stunning feat. One of the aspects I particularly love about this latest chapter is how the quartet explores much further and deeper into more contemporary and experimental terrain as illustrated by the wide range of sounds and possibilities attained throughout. Please take me back to the three nights of live performances at the Fumbally Stables and your memories of the music-making process during this special time? Describe the space as a live setting and your live set-up in this space too?

Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh: The Fumbally Stables is a small room at the back of the Fumbally Cafe in Dublin, just off Clanbrassil Street, which has built up a wonderful vibrant community around it over the last few years, and it is run by friends of ours.  We played three nights in a row in front of a small audience each night, maybe 40/50 people.  We played in the round, which is a real treat for us, and something that we had experimented with at both the Sirius Arts Centre in Cobh and the Solstice Arts Centre in Navan.  It’s such a lovely way to play together, as opposed to being fanned out across a stage, much more intimate and easier to connect with and hear everyone.  We played pretty much acoustically, with a small Genelec speaker for Seán’s live processing, and also some reinforcement for Petter’s percussion.

Nic Gareiss: It was January when we recorded so we tried to create as warm and inviting an atmosphere as possible: ambient light, candles, people sitting very close to one another and to us. I think that’s really evident in the recording and in the video Myles O’Reilly of Arbutus Yarns shot for the single “Rí Rua”. The idea of crafting the space for an audience to exist, in addition to the actual music or movement they experience is something I’ve become really interested in lately as a performer.  There’s something quite rewarding about preparing the actual space in which the “event” will occur and realizing that it has a large impact on the way the sounds and dance steps are received!

Seán Mac Erlaine: The really big part of what we do in performance is to make a very real communication between the group and the audience as well as a constant communication between the four of us making the music. So with this second album it seemed important to try and capture that and to try and get away from the typical recording studio set-up where there is physical separation between musicians. At the same time we like to present our music in the best way possible so we didn’t want this to have one of those live-album-so-we-can-forgive-the-crappy-sound attempts, y’know those ones where the singer forgets some of the words and the bass player is a little out of tune sometimes… We hired in Mats Helgesson from Sweden who is an expert in live recording and who managed to make us sound like we were in a studio but with an audience (who remained amazingly quiet!!!).

Petter Berndalen: Just for these concerts I had to think of several different angles. I would both play the concerts as a musician, but I also felt a responsibility to create something that was afterwards formable to a sound that had evolved into my mind from the launch of our debut album and up to now.

With the thought that I would like to mix our new album, the thoughts fell sharply in Mats’s direction. Furthermore, Mats and me put together an audio equipment of utmost quality, the choices we made of, among other things, microphones, preamps, cables, created a first form of what we can hear on the album today.

I’d love to gain an insight into your discussions and creative aspirations – as a quartet – that you would have been sharing and discussing prior to the recording/live performances back in January? For instance, having the gorgeous debut album already under your belt and having played many live shows worldwide in support of that album, you must have had a whole world of ideas and avenues in which you all wanted to explore on this highly anticipated follow-up?

CÓR: I think we wanted to create some music that was more integrated, rather than one person bringing a tune that the rest of the band then subsequently arranges.  So finding ways of writing music together was definitely a priority.  We also chose not to follow the route of making arrangements of traditional tunes, preferring to focus primarily on music we write.

SME: All those live gigs really shape the band so we start to understand more what the group can do and where we might be able to push things forward in our sound. The new album does – thankfully – sound different to the first one and I think it represents how we have grown together. Having writing time together was essential to make that happen and there’s more of everyone, and everyone at once, on this new record.

tihwf live

The title-track is a formidable piece of music, eternally mystical and bright melodies of rejoice. This piece is essentially in two parts and how the darker, inward patterns of part B fades into focus is a joy to savour. Can you talk me through this piece and the layering/construction of the various elements? It’s one of those incredible feats just how these intricate layers of achingly beautiful sounds fuse together so effortlessly, and these warm textures and motifs forever heighten and inspire. As a title also (and particularly as the album title), I’d love for you to discuss the significance or meaning of the title?

CÓR: The title ‘Foreign Fields’ comes from a poem my cousin Anthony Cunningham wrote for his father.  Sonny left Longford for New York when he was a very young man, and though he reached into his eighties, he never once returned home.  The idea of foreign fields appeals to me in both directions – the strangeness of the vast acres over there, but the memory too of every blade of grass back home, every ditch, gripe and clump of rushes.

SME: It’s an example of what happens when we get to write in the same space together. All the parts are written in the room at once so that they interlock and reinforce each other. I guess it’s this approach to composition that we were really seeking out rather than taking a piece which more or less exists and either just playing it or, worse, playing on top of it. It takes much more time to develop music this way but it’s been really satisfying for us and a nice challenge to play too.

PB: My favorite moment in the creation of this composition was when I and Nic suddenly found ourselves in the rhythmic dark texture that companions the march melody. The sound of that rhythm, the rhythm in itself and the way it fits in its context is the result of my and Nics un verbal common language, constantly evolving over the seven years we have been listening to and communicating with each other.

I get the impression that ‘Fjellvant’ feels like a piece that perhaps Petter brought to the table? The voice treatments and cinematic dimension that this composition inhabits unleashes a wall of raw emotion. I wonder as the quartet would often be split up, both geographically and being busy with other projects and musical incarnations, do you find yourself composing as solo entities and only once you join up as a four-piece, would you suddenly begin sharing all these ideas? Do you see the compositional approach to pieces such as ‘Fjellvant’ or ‘Ti Mor’ (for example) alter in a drastic way, or would the creative process be a more constant process?

CÓR: I think Fjellvant started with the little few notes I recorded on an iPad during one of the band’s writing days.  We spent a few days in the Tyrone Guthrie Centre in Monaghan, and would split up into pairs to work on stuff, so myself and Seán pulled Fjellvant out of the bag and he brought his electronics to the party.  When we brought it back to the boys, it already felt like a complete thing unto itself, so that’s how it remains!

SME: We’ve often played short solo sets so we thought let’s see if we can try duo material. Fjellvant (a Norwegian word pertaining to mountain walking) is one of the duos that made the cut. Also, hiking is something that Caoimhín and I really like to do and perhaps not on all of TIHWF’s to do lists! If I were to recast my life I might try being a singing contemporary dancer and sometimes the guys let me sing a tiny bit (I’m not going to bust out any moves with Nic beside me).

The album radiates the sense of a live performance where the band are playing live; sharing the same as the listener. The special, unique live shows of This Is How We Fly is ultimately translated onto the final album. Was this a primary objective for the band? Also, please discuss the aesthetic quality of your work and this space you travel deep inside when it comes to making music together? I love the solo pieces (however short!) that wonderfully bridge various pieces that form majestic interludes throughout (which again, brings you back to the band’s live shows).

CÓR: The audience has always been such an important part of how this band works, and we felt that perhaps we were losing something by going into studio to record.  We wanted to make this record in collaboration with our audience, from the crowd-sourced funding, to having their listening, enthusiasm and energy as part of the air around us as we recorded.

NG: We’ve experimented over the nearly seven years we’ve been performing together about how best to convey the way that live gigs seem so close to the heart of this project. As I mentioned, this has included work with filmmakers, including several collaborations with Myles of Arbutus Yarns and Donal Dineen, but also the creation of performances in unorthodox spaces, most notably a dilapidated Georgian House on North Great George’s Street in Dublin as part of Seán’s ongoing series The Walls Have Ears during the Dublin Fringe. The privilege and power of creating something in the moment, not only in front of an audience, but in response to them is endlessly invigorating for us. In this way, the in-the-round, mostly-acoustic, live format was the perfect avenue for us to try to share our interest in creating music as a practice of rapport.  This rapport is with the audience, with our own bodies, with the tools of our craft (drumsticks, fiddle bow, clarinet keys, dance shoes) and with each other.

PB: Sharing the same thing as the listener. To me, this is probably the only way I can or rather want to play music. I find no greater interest in sharing with a monologue. What’s interesting in a meeting with a listener, is the listener’s contribution back to the musician and the musician’s ability to take in this, do something of it and then share the next phrase with the listener, to hear what this one has to say this time!

The same is true of how we communicate with each other in the band. Just playing a song straight off just like it sounded last time, there are many others who find joy in that. But in the musical context I myself want to find myself in, I prefer to be 100% communicative in each phrase, every breath, every second.

tihwf pic

As solo musicians and composers, you have carved out unique solo paths with your own singular sound and musical identity. Please take me back to your earliest musical memories and the landscape that you feel has shaped and influenced your own individual musical paths? For instance, Nic, you have a really beautiful spoken word piece where you recount your memories of a teacher of yours in Limerick, the lyrics for which are truly inspiring. It is the way each member brings their own colours and rich language to the divine sonic canvas of the overall sound and how each one complements and further heightens one another, this must have taken you by surprise (in some ways) when you first came together and played together?

CÓR: I have so many memories from both listening to and playing traditional music that have shaped what I’m aiming for when I play.  Hearing Tony Mac Mahon stopping time playing ‘James Connolly’ in the Cobalt Cafe; fourteen hours non-stop playing with Dermy Diamond in Queally’s Pub in Miltown Malbay during the Willie Clancy, day after day after day, lit up by the man of the house throwing a step out of the blue; playing ‘The Rolling Wave’ by myself for hours upon hours on a New Year’s Eve, over and over again, until music became magic for the first time…

NG: Thanks! Often as part of our concerts, we each take a moment to allow one another to stretch out, allowing the audience to engage with our sounds individually. The piece “Scraping for Peggy” came out of this little band ritual and is dedicated to legendary Cork Irish dance teacher Peggy McTeggart. She said, “I’ll have no scrapers in our class”.  For her, “good” dance technique was adroit, crisp, and clean, resulting from a short sharp connection to the ground. This became a provocation for me to make whispery, gritty, hushed, or “dirty” sounds by sustaining my contact with the floor. There’s a playful sense of the joy of transgression, of doing what you’re told not to do, that honestly fills my heart with glee every time I get to dance the piece in her memory. For me, the connection to this older dancer and the way that tradition begs as many questions as it provides answers becomes a locus of performance but also of pleasure for me and hopefully for the audience as well.

SME: I’m not sure I have many early musical memories, I was into my teens by the time I got hooked on Bob Dylan and worlds surrounding that, but I don’t think you will hear much of that in my playing. Often the non-musical will inspire me as much as my listening habits. These days all I try to do is get out of my own way and let music flow and the direction I’m moving in is that the music has less and less to do with me than with the moment present, the players present and the people present.

PB: I remember that an early wish I had was the desire to possess the technical skills I have today on my instrument, but at the same time never heard of music of any kind before.

Today, however, I realize that my physical ability at my instrument and how it is intertwined with my wider musical understanding is the essence of what I do.

But to easily summarize how I have received my unique musical signature, I can say that it has arisen from many years of trying to translate Swedish folk music played on violin to same thing, but on drums.

An important question within my work is how central aspects of melody, such as hierarchical form and phrasing, melodic contour, ornamentation, etc. can be represented percussion playing on a drum kit where precise pitch transitions are not possible. Other important questions concern how to capture the rhythmic and metrical flexibility and ambiguity of Swedish traditional fiddle music on an instrument in which the rhythmic expression is precise and explicit.

Please shed some light on the Irish compositions ‘Ti Mor’ and ‘Ri Rua’. Can you recount your memories of the earliest versions of these pieces and how they bloomed over time? ‘Ri Rua’ feels like it could have originated between Sean and Caoimhin whereas ‘Ti Mor’ was a duet between Nic and Petter?

CÓR: Rí Rua was such an enjoyable tune to work on with Seán – trying to find ways of weaving notes, rhythms and phrases together on the two instruments.  I think the earliest version started with Seán’s phrases, and we worked out from there.

NG: Tí Mór began with a particular groove that’s created by a step known in Appalachian dance communities as the Tennessee Walking Step. The step is credited to Robert Dotson and was later modified and used by dancers in the US folk revival of the 1970s and 80s. It’s an insistent, bass-treble movement produced by stepping onto the floor and dropping one’s body weight through the foot (that’s the bass), then sliding backwards on the floor creating a sibilant brighter sound (that’s the treble part). Petter remarked that we rarely access this particular rhythmic pattern in our music and suggested we create something inspired by it. The piece winds up feeling like a track of Electronic Dance Music in which the beats are actually made by dancing!!

Lastly, the sprawling tour-de-force ‘Agus a hAon :: Mumpsimus :: Counterline’ spans the breadth of part B. I love this drifting, floating quality to the piece, how the woodwind dances its majestic dance amidst infinite colours of percussion and soaring fiddles. I get the impression this piece must have taken a considerable time to flesh out, so to speak and write the distinct movements inherent in this piece of music? Some of these melodies on the record sound at once wholly familiar and utterly unknown; perhaps one foot is steeped in tradition and the other is searching deep into new, unknown horizons.

CÓR: Yeah, I really love these three tunes! The second part of the first tune is really satisfying to me in its simple confusion. Mumpsimus is a waltz that initally made perfect sense to me but to no one else, hence the name, which means ‘a person who obstinately adheres to an idea in spite of evidence that they are wrong or unreasonable’.  And Counterline always feels SO good to play, again it’s very satisfying to me how the various parts interlock.

SME: There’s a mixture here of tightly written material and quite loose improvisation which feels nice, one moment we are in unison and then the atmosphere loosens and, as a player, you are free to contribute whatever feels just right for the piece. I know what you mean about the familiar sounding melodies, sometimes I wonder when we are writing, hey, surely someone has written this melody already, it’s so… simple! It’s hard to be objective but I haven’t heard anyone else playing them yet so I think we are in clear!

Your musical philosophy as a quartet. Can you somehow pinpoint what this is? Also, what you feel you have learned as a group over the past six (or so) years and what you feel comes next for the band, as you continually develop and evolve?

NG: I think Petter summed this up beautifully once during an interview we were giving at a French folk festival. He said, “You don’t need to practice to talk with your friends.” While we do of course see the value in rehearsal, the idea of being open to conversation in music-making – and being open to that conversation taking a radically different turn in performance than when you had it earlier in rehearsal, feels really crucial to this project. We want our performances to be very much about responding to one another and to audiences, wherever they (and we!) are affectually. As for what’s next: deeper rapport, perhaps an exploration of “home-ness” as opposed to the wonder and amazement of the “foreign fields.”  And maybe even an entire dance step-based EDM release!

SME: Yes, the essential philosophy would revolve around ideas of togetherness. Being together and listening. It may sound odd but listening is more important to us than even playing and there have been occasions where, on stage, each musicians stops playing but continues listening and we continue the piece without there being any piece left! In the seven years I hope we’ve learnt more about each other and, through that, ourselves. I think we are all pretty happy to continue as we started off with an openness to explore and push and learn and what that will sound like just depends on whichever moment you hear us.

PB: A dream I’ve been wearing for a very long time and which has become true with TIHWF is the fact that there’s no difference at all to just being together and playing music together.

‘Foreign Fields’ is available NOW.

http://www.thisishowwefly.net/

https://www.facebook.com/ThisIsHowWeFly/

 

 

 

 

Written by admin

October 12, 2017 at 12:23 pm

Mixtape: Tompkins Square Mix by Josh Rosenthal

leave a comment »

tompkins-square-sleeve

1) Shawn David McMillen – “Fuck Norfolk (For Max Ochs)”

I just wrapped up a mini-tour of the West Coast with two original Takoma Records guitarists, Max Ochs and Harry Taussig. They had never met, even though they were on the same Takoma sampler 50 years ago ! A few years back I released a digital EP, ‘Hooray For Max Ochs’, with folks paying tribute to Max. This one is by Texas artist Shawn McMillen who toured with Max and Christina Carter in 2006.

2) Peter Walker – “Hot Fusion”

I called Peter this morning to tell him it’s Karen Dalton’s 80th birthday today (July 19). He and Karen were very close. This track is from A Raga For Peter Walker, which featured the first new recordings by Peter in 40 years, plus tracks in tribute by Jack Rose, Thurston Moore and others.

3) Ben Reynolds – “England”

This is one of my favorite guitar tracks in our catalog. Ben went on to play in Trembling Bells.

4) Nathan Salsburg – “Bold Ruler’s Joys”

Today is also Nathan Salsburg’s birthday ! He once told me this track, which I asked him to do for Imaginational Anthem vol 3, was the “a-ha” moment when he decided to take himself seriously as a solo guitarist. Now look at him; collaborating with Joan Shelley, Bonnie Prince Billy and James Elkington. Might be the most technically proficient player on the acoustic scene. Can play in any style clean and pretty, but with soul too.

5) Richard Crandell – “Swallowtails”

For someone with the purest of hearts and zero career aspirations, Richard has actually built a great catalog – fine duo records, mbira records, a superb Christmas LP, and one stone classic – In The Flower of Our Youth, which we reissued on LP. Swallowtails is from a collection of 80s/90s recordings we just released as ‘Then & Now’ digitally. Flower is maybe my favorite rural road trip soundtrack. Try it !

6) Laurel Halo – “Blue Notion”

This one is from Remembering Mountains : Unheard Songs by Karen Dalton. Laurel Halo is someone I keep tabs on, an amazing artist. Her new album ‘Dust’ is ambitious and bold. Today would have been Karen’s 80th, so this song gets a revisit.

7) A Broken Consort – “A Mercy Kill”

We released two albums by British composer Richard Skelton, who has recorded under many pseudonyms. He is a visual artist, musician and publisher of journals and poetry, many relating to nature. I’ve worked with many talented people, but Richard might be the only one who actually deserves to be called a “genius.”

8) Hiss Golden Messenger – “Fennario”

Michael Taylor has moved on to big things since recording this track – signing with Merge and playing big festivals worldwide. But when I asked him to cover his favorite Michael Chapman song, I had no idea he’d bring so much to this faithful “Fennario” from MC’s Wrecked Again LP. I mean everything, down to the gospel backing vocals. Everything a “tribute” should be – bringing a great song to life again. I bet even some of his fans haven’t heard this one yet . . .

9) William Tyler – “Ponotoc”

This version is from the live WT CD we snuck into the Imaginational Anthem 1-5 box set. It’s out of print and not available in any other form, so sort of a scoop here. Tompkins Square released Will’s debut LP, Behold The Spirit, which has only grown in stature as a landmark LP.

10) Brigid Mae Power – “My Lagan Love”

B-side released last year digitally, new album in the works from this Irish songstress. I first heard this song via Van Morrison’s Irish Heartbeat LP back in the 80’s. Tompkins Square learned about Brigid from . . . Fractured Air . . . and are eternally grateful. We love her.

“Deep Cuts” Playlist by Josh Rosenthal (Tompkins Square)

01. Shawn David McMillen“Fuck Norfolk (For Max Ochs)”
02. Peter Walker“Hot Fusion”
03. Ben Reynolds“England”
04. Nathan Salsburg“Bold Ruler’s Joys”
05. Richard Crandell “Swallowtails”
06. Laurel Halo“Blue Notion”
07. A Broken Consort“A Mercy Kill”
08. Hiss Golden Messenger “Fennario”
09. William Tyler“Ponotoc”
10. Brigid Mae Power – “My Lagan Love”

Compiled by Josh Rosenthal, July 2017.

http://www.tompkinssquare.com/
https://www.facebook.com/tompkinssq/

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S02E09 | September mix

leave a comment »

fracturedair_sep17

Australian-born composer and songwriter Carla dal Forno’s eagerly-anticipated new material comes in the form of “The Garden”, a 12” for UK’s Blackest Ever Black, due for release on October 6th and folow-up to her sublime debut full-length “You Know What It’s Like”. Dal Forno is also a member of the trio F ingers (alongside Samuel Karmel and Tarquin Manek) who release their second LP, “Awkwardly Blissing Out”, this month. Recorded in Melbourne and Berlin between 2015–17, the album is the follow-up to the trio’s 2015 debut album “Hide Before Dinner”. Dal Forno’s own mixes (originally made for Berlin Community Radio while residing in the German capital; she now compiles monthly hour-long shows for NTS Radio) are always an indispensable source for music (Circuit 7’s “Eastern Dreams” from our September mixtape is one such example).

The forever-inspiring Chicago-based artist Circuit des Yeux (Haley Fohr) releases her magnificent fifth studio album “Reaching For Indigo” on U.S. independent Drag City on 20th October. Unveiled so far is the mesmerising new single “Black Fly” which confirms Fohr as one of independent music’s most singular voices and fascinating contemporary music-makers.

Anthology Recordings – Mexican Summer’s reissue imprint – release the majestic compilation “Feel The Music Vol. 1” next month. Compiled by Paul Major – pioneering record dealer and frontman of the band Endless Boogie – this truly special record effortlessly spans sounds and styles (folk, psychedelia, blues, rock n roll) while unearthing a plethora of truly unique (and largely unknown to wider audiences) songwriters from a golden age of music.

September’s mix also features new releases from possibly the year’s most anticipated pair of albums which come courtesy of both Four Tet (“New Energy”, Text) and Godspeed You! Black Emperor (Constellation). Electronic maestro Four Tet and his monumental “New Energy” album (available via his Text imprint from 29th September); Montréal’s mythical Godspeed You! Black Emperor unleash their sublime seventh album “Luciferian Towers” via Constellation which confirm the band (as if confirmation was ever necessary) as one of the world’s most ceaselessly innovative and breathtaking bands.

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S02E08 | August mix

 

To listen on La Blogothèque:

http://www.blogotheque.net/2017/09/29/fractured-air-x-blogotheque-s02e09-september-mix/

 

01. Godspeed You! Black Emperor“Fam/Famine” (Constellation)
02. Dungen“Achmed Flyger” (Version 1) (Versions by Prins Thomas) (Smalltown Supersound)
03. James Holden & The Animal Spirits“Each Moment Like The First” (Border Community)
04. Circuit des Yeux“Black Fly” (Drag City)
05. Forest Swords“Raw Language” (Ninja Tune)
06. Yasuaki Shimizu“Seiko 1” (Crammed Discs)
07. Ariel Pink“Feels Like Heaven” (Mexican Summer)
08. The Smiths“The Hand That Rocks The Cradle” (Rough Trade)
09. Arthur Russell“Get Around To It” (Rough Trade, Audika)
10. Nausea“No Conversation” (Ecstatic)
11. Circuit 7“Eastern Dreams” (Minimal Wave)
12. Carla dal Forno“The Garden” (Blackest Ever Black)
13. Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith“To Feel Your Best” (Western Vinyl)
14. Richard Horowitz“Eros Never Stops Dreaming” (RVNG Intl)
15. F Ingers“Your Confused” (Blackest Ever Black)
16. Geinoh Yamashirogumi“Kaneda” (Akira OST, Milan)
17. Sanza“Sounout” (Original Mix) (Music For Dreams)
18. Burial“Rodent” (Hyperdub)
19. Four Tet“Scientists” (Text)
20. Actress & London Contemporary Orchestra“Audio Track 5” (Ninja Tune)
21. Carmen Villain“Red Desert” (Smalltown Supersound)
22. Blue Iverson“Who Shot Lucious Lyon?” (Self-Released)
23. Darius“I Feel The Need To Carry On” (Anthology Recordings)
24. Bill Mackay & Ryley Walker“Dragonfly” (Drag City)
25. Ry Cooder“I Knew These People” (excerpt) (Paris Texas OST, Warner Bros.)
26. Sun Kil Moon“Si, Paloma” (Caldo Verde)

Compiled by Fractured Air, September 2017. The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.

http://www.blogotheque.net/
https://fracturedair.com/

First Listen: “Black Fly” by Circuit des Yeux

leave a comment »

We are delighted to host the mesmerizing new single “Black Fly” by the singular Chicago-based artist Circuit des Yeux. This cathartic tour-de-force is taken from Haley Fohr’s eagerly awaited fifth studio album “Reaching For Indigo” available on 20th October 2017 via Drag City.

CircuitDesYeux_byJuliaDratel_02

On the meditative and mesmerizing new single ‘Black Fly’, Haley Fohr’s empowering voice unleashes a kind of catharsis like no other (a trusted constant which has only heightened with each of Fohr’s five spellbinding full-length albums under the Circuit des Yeux moniker). Beginning with angelic, hushed tones – soft strum of acoustic guitar and Fohr’s fragile, whisper-like voice – Fohr sings “Nobody said it was easy”.  The timeless spirit of Leonard Cohen radiates throughout these opening verses as intricate arrangements of immaculate instrumentation is gradually interwoven beneath Fohr’s singular voice. The song’s glorious rise – as Fohr’s achingly beautiful falsetto soars majestically beneath gorgeous strings – creates a purging of the rawest of human emotions as a catharsis is emitted like rays of shimmering light. “You’re not the dark star they want you to be/You’re just a black dot in the sky” Fohr cries over distorted noise and thundering drums signalling the dichotomy of worlds the listener becomes beautifully engulfed by; the radiant light of hope and depths of darkness.

 

 

 

Song from “Reaching for Indigo” LP/CD, available on October 20, 2017 from Drag City.

Imagery by Julia Dratel
Processing by Nick Ciontea

Pre-order “Reaching for Indigo”:
Drag City
http://www.dragcity.com/products/reaching-for-indigo
Apple iTunes
http://itunes.apple.com/album/id1264016548

“Reaching for Indigo” LP/CD, is available on October 20, 2017 from Drag City.

https://www.facebook.com/CircuitdesYeux/
https://www.facebook.com/dragcityrecords/

Written by admin

September 18, 2017 at 3:29 pm

First Listen: ‘Crystal Palace’ by Fadi Tabbal

with one comment

We are delighted to premiere ‘Crystal Palace’ by renowned Lebanese artist Fadi Tabbal, taken from the forthcoming full-length release ‘Museum of Disappearing Buildings’ co-released by Portland’s Beacon Sound and Lebanese label Ruptured.

BNSD023_cover.jpg

The prestigious Portland-based label Beacon Sound are co-releasing an album by Beirut artist Fadi Tabbal on 6th October 2017 with Lebanese label Ruptured. The Lebanese musician, producer and sound engineer Fadi Tabbal’s work consists of guitar-based drone soundscapes fused with utterly transcendent ambient flourishes. ‘Crystal Palace’ is the sublime closing piece to Tabbal’s newest solo release (which is limited to 300 vinyl copies).

Fadi has been central to the Beirut music scene for the last decade, running Tunefork Studios and playing in multiple groups. Museum Of Disappearing Buildings is his second solo album and first release to appear on vinyl. It is an album of ambient guitar drones and grainy electronics that reflects the precarious political and social environment of Beirut while also being inspired by the impossible structures of Russian paper architects Brodsky and Utkin. He is featured in the book Local Music Scenes and Globalization: Transnational Platforms in Beirut by Thomas Burkhalter (Routledge; 2013), which advocates against Euro-American centrism in the realm of music in favor of a ‘multi-sited global avant garde’. This is the first collaboration between Beacon Sound (Portland) and Ruptured (Beirut).

 

Fadi will also perform live with fellow Beirut musician Munma in Berlin on November 4th 2017 at the 3rd iteration of A Happening, co-curated by Beacon Sound.

The Portland-based label have released a diverse range of internationally-renowned artists: Terry Riley, Colleen, Peter Broderick, Johann Johannsson, Lucrecia Dalt, Gareth Dickson and many more. Forthcoming releases include upcoming albums by Benoit Pioulard and Lau Nau, as well as a repress of minimalist-piano classic The Book Of Sounds by German composer Hans Otte.

‘Museum of Disappearing Buildings’ is out on 6th October 2017 via Beacon Sound and Ruptured (Pre-order HERE).

http://www.faditabbal.com/

http://www.wearebeaconsound.com/

http://www.rupturedonline.com

Written by admin

September 7, 2017 at 2:26 pm

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S02E08 | August mix

with one comment

fracturedair_august17.jpg

August’s mixtape features a pair of tracks from This Is How We Fly’s eagerly-anticipated second album “Foreign Fields”, due for release on 15th September 2017. The four-piece comprise the renowned musicians: Petter Berndalen (drums), Nic Gareiss (percussive dance), Seán Mac Erlaine (clarinets, electronics) and Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh (hardanger d’amore fiddles). Hailing from Ireland, Sweden and USA, the quartet draw upon a rich tapestry of sounds and traditions, drawing upon the raw energy and rich dynamism of jazz and its true spirit of improvisation, together with traditional music’s eternal affinity and appreciation for honing and perfecting one’s craft. “Foreign Fields” is a joy to behold, its soul-stirring music navigates new sonic terrain while continually pushing its four composers to reach for new heights, forever onwards and upwards for this most inventive and mythical of bands.

UK producer James Holden’s “The Inheritors” (Border Community, 2013) was one of this century’s finest records, an album for modern times created by one of the most consistently innovative and singular artists making music today. With the announcement that it’s long-awaited follow-up, “The Animal Spirits” (due for release on 3rd November once again via Holden’s own Border Community label), it is bound to rise to the surface on many an end-of-year lists come December. The album (described as “synth-led folk-trance standards”) features Holden’s newly assembled group of “fellow travellers”, James Holden & The Animal Spirits. The personnel comprises long-time collaborators Tom Page and Etienne Jaumet, as well as Marcus Hamblett, Liza Bec and Lascelle Gordon. The album’s lead single, “Pass Through The Fire” has so far been unveiled, the track having been inspired by his 2014 trip to Morocco to work with late Gnawa music legend Maalem Mahmoud Guinia. James Holden was also recently added to the special guest curatorial program at this November’s Le Guess Who? Festival at Utrecht, where he has invited such stellar musicians as Serbia’s Mario Batkovic and Canada’s Jerusalem In My Heart to his lineup.

August’s mix also features new releases from: Julie Byrne’s “Not Even Happiness” (Basin Rock); Four Tet’s latest essential single for his Text imprint, “Planet”; Grouper’s new track “Children” (taken from her “Ruins” album sessions); Rafael Anton Irisarri’s mesmerising “The Shameless Years” (Umor Rex) and Hype Williams“Rainbow Edition” (Big Dada Recordings).

Fractured Air x Blogothèque – S02E08 | August mix

 

To listen on La Blogothèque:

http://www.blogotheque.net/2017/09/01/fractured-air-x-blogotheque-s02e08-august-mix

 

01. Psychic TV“Just Drifting” (WEA, Some Bizzare)
02. Moor Mother“Valley of Dry Bones” (Don Giovanni)
03. Mica Levi & Oliver Coates“I’ll Keep Going” (Slip)
04. Hype Williams“#Blackcardsmatter” (Big Dada Recordings)
05. Lee Gamble“Istian” (Hyperdub)
06. Rhythm & Sound with Cornel Campbell“King In My Empire” (Soul Jazz)
07. Ken Parker“My Whole World Is Falling Down” (Heartbeat)
08. This Is How We Fly“Tí Mór” (Self-Released)
09. Laurel Halo“Who Won?” (Hyperdub)
10. James Holden & The Animal Spirits“Pass Through The Fire” (Border Community)
11. Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith“To Follow And Lead” (Western Vinyl)
12. SAICOBAB“Bx Ax Bx” (Thrill Jockey)
13. Snapped Ankles“Hanging With The Moon” (The Leaf Label)
14. Ex Eye“Xenolith; the Anvil” (Relapse)
15. Suicide“Cheree” (Red Star)
16. Four Tet“Planet” (Text)
17. Washed Out“Down and Out” (Stones Throw)
18. Mariah“Shinzo No Tobira” (Palto Flats, Columbia)
19. LCD Soundsystem“tonite” (DFA, Columbia)
20. Severed Heads“Dead Eyes Opened” (Dark Entries)
21. Jefre Cantu-Ledesma“Echoing Green” (Mexican Summer)
22. Rafael Anton Irisarri“Sky Burial” (Umor Rex)
23. This Will Destroy You“The Puritan” (Julianna Barwick Remix) (Suicide Squeeze)
24. Grouper “Children” (Bandcamp)
25. Benoît Pioulard“Rook” (Beacon Sound)
26. Julie Byrne“Natural Blue” (Basin Rock, Ba Da Bing!)
27. This Is How We Fly“Fjellvant” (Self-Released)
28. Do Make Say Think“Shlomo’s Son” (Constellation)

Compiled by Fractured Air, August 2017. The copyright in these recordings is the property of the individual artists and/or record labels. If you like the music, please support the artist by buying their records.

http://www.blogotheque.net/
https://fracturedair.com/